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Show Us Your Fossils Challenge Mode: Ordered By Geologic Time Period!


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From the Pleistocene Waccamaw Formation of North Carolina

 

Columbus County

 

These were found by me over a several year period during the late 2010's and 2020's

 

A variety of Pleistocene goodies

 

OD.thumb.jpg.080b47d162df96d2bfea4088c77ecc1e.jpg

 

 

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There's a Holocene exposure on the beach at De Kaloot by Borssele in Zeeland Holland which I visited once in May, 2011. When the sands have shifted properly you can pry out some nice chunks like this one with colorful Cerastoderma edule, Macoma balthica and Spisula sp. bivalves. This piece measures 18x15x4cm.

 

L179.1.thumb.jpg.041845a1f6f5896ff54beb1d2b57c5e4.jpg

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8 hours ago, historianmichael said:

Baculites texanus

Late Cretaceous Period

Wenonah Formation

New Jersey

 

63AA4041-C04B-494E-BD41-8BE2EE5B7C03.thumb.jpeg.f312459e53c75836170e3db0d4e883c8.jpeg

 

That's a nice association piece.

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7 hours ago, MarcoSr said:

 

 

 

I look for 6 sets of features on the lingual side of the tooth to help distinguish between Alopias/Trigonotodus and O. megalodon.  The root shape on top (gradual slope, deep U etc.) and root lobe shapes are two features.  However, with an upper lateral Alopias (giant thresher) root shape can be very similar to O. megalodon.   However, this tooth looks like the root lobes neck inward (could be damage making it appear that way) which is a feature on O. megalodon. The crown shape, another feature, with an upper lateral Alopias (giant thresher) can be very similar to O. megalodon.  The crown shoulders on the Alopias (giant thresher) have an outward bulge, but wear on this tooth is obscuring this feature.  The Alopias (giant thresher) serations are more ragged and non-uniform than a O. megalodon, but again wear is obscuring this feature.  Whether the tooth has a distinct bourlette is another feature to look at.  Again wear is obscuring this feature.  The bottom of the root is rounded by the middle of the crown on an Alopias (giant thresher) whereas an O. megalodon has a bourlette that tends to be triangular and comes to a point near the middle of the crown.  This tooth shows a definite triangular area coming to a point where the bourlette would be.  So based upon what I see in this lingual view I definitely lean toward O. megalodon.

 

 

608104987_Tooth7.thumb.jpg.66b2b8dd993f8a0d8d1f2b620d4adadd.jpg

 

 

 

However, a labial view of the tooth would also show two additional features that help distinguish Alopias (giant thresher) from O. Megalodon.  Please post a labial view of the tooth.

 

Marco Sr.

 

Yes, it seems more like a meg root but the serrations seem more distinct like A. palatasi even though it's worn.  I'm leaning toward megalodon too.

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historianmichael
6 minutes ago, siteseer said:

That's a nice association piece.

Thank you. It now resides in the MAPS collection.

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2 hours ago, FranzBernhard said:

Here we go:

@JamieLynn: 7 points.

@rocket5 points.

@Ludwigia: 4 points.

@Nimravis, @siteseer: 3 points.

@historianmichael, @Wrangellian: 1 point.

 

1 point for each entry in correct order.

1 extra point for size.

1 extra point for how and when acquired.

1 or 2 extra points for extra info (highly subjective!).

Will run until December 31st, 2022.

 

Its all for good fun and education, not winning ;).

 

Franz Bernhard

 

Yes.  I'm not in it for the money nor the glory.  Just the fun.  That's a joke referring to a line from "Smokey and the Bandit."

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7 hours ago, JamieLynn said:

Since we had at one point discussed breaking the Cretaceous into Lower and Upper (since there's SO MUCH OF IT) I am posting "out of order" a Lower Cretaceous because I don't get to catch the Cretaceous very often!! Give Historianmicheal his point...I don't care about the points.

Comtulid Crinoid Not Identified (as far as we know, these have not been ID'd)

Size 3/8 inch

820654394_CrinoidGR.thumb.jpg.d1ff13cfad2e57021166b9daa42a30af.jpg

 

 

very interesting species, could you post some more pics and the exact stratigraphic position? Thanks

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49 minutes ago, siteseer said:

 

Yes, it seems more like a meg root but the serrations seem more distinct like A. palatasi even though it's worn.  I'm leaning toward megalodon too.

 

Jess

 

The serrations on the tooth look too uniform in width which to me looks more like O. megalodon.  But worn serrations are not a good diagnostic feature.

 

Marco Sr.

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@rocket  Glen Rose Formation Central Texas

1126358427_8CrinoidcomatulidBandera(2).thumb.jpg.bce993c97d69528cf8ec673d73e6f7e2.jpg

 

2116707992_8CrinoidcomatulidBandera(4).thumb.jpg.1dbaa8592ca222b994f00364e1f46890.jpg

 

And here is another one from the same formation,  but different location:

 

123612498_KTXCRI021CrinoidCormatulidMtSharpGR(11).thumb.JPG.0951ef18b3697441013c217650561474.JPG

 

27873777_KTXCRI021CrinoidCormatulidMtSharpGR(12).thumb.JPG.3acb662d2aaf8463a4400a679116575e.JPG

 

906796054_KTXCRI021CrinoidCormatulidMtSharpGR(10).thumb.JPG.6872eadf8f3a5c8ce3517b76b560ce0b.JPG

 

 

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20 hours ago, Al Dente said:

 


Probably Alopias palatasi.

 

CC351197-5CEE-41DA-9994-9E57CFDDD25C.thumb.jpeg.c819f0ba7fc69f254e9e41f5df5090cd.jpeg

B31C0C99-5471-4E5B-97D7-BCE1C4094BA6.jpeg

 

17 hours ago, MarcoSr said:

 

 

 

I look for 6 sets of features on the lingual side of the tooth to help distinguish between Alopias/Trigonotodus and O. megalodon.  The root shape on top (gradual slope, deep U etc.) and root lobe shapes are two features.  However, with an upper lateral Alopias (giant thresher) root shape can be very similar to O. megalodon.   However, this tooth looks like the root lobes neck inward (could be damage making it appear that way) which is a feature on O. megalodon. The crown shape, another feature, with an upper lateral Alopias (giant thresher) can be very similar to O. megalodon.  The crown shoulders on the Alopias (giant thresher) have an outward bulge, but wear on this tooth is obscuring this feature.  The Alopias (giant thresher) serations are more ragged and non-uniform than a O. megalodon, but again wear is obscuring this feature.  Whether the tooth has a distinct bourlette is another feature to look at.  Again wear is obscuring this feature.  The bottom of the root is rounded by the middle of the crown on an Alopias (giant thresher) whereas an O. megalodon has a bourlette that tends to be triangular and comes to a point near the middle of the crown.  This tooth shows a definite triangular area coming to a point where the bourlette would be.  So based upon what I see in this lingual view I definitely lean toward O. megalodon.

 

 

608104987_Tooth7.thumb.jpg.66b2b8dd993f8a0d8d1f2b620d4adadd.jpg

 

 

 

However, a labial view of the tooth would also show two additional features that help distinguish Alopias (giant thresher) from O. Megalodon.  Please post a labial view of the tooth.

 

Marco Sr.

@Al Dente... @MarcoSr

 

Gentlemen, I want to thank you both!  I learned something new today.  I have not heard of this species.  I need to track down that reference.

 

Here are 3 additional photos0

 

 

IMG_2749.jpg

IMG_2748.jpg

IMG_2747.jpg

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11 hours ago, JamieLynn said:

@rocket  Glen Rose Formation Central Texas

1126358427_8CrinoidcomatulidBandera(2).thumb.jpg.bce993c97d69528cf8ec673d73e6f7e2.jpg

 

2116707992_8CrinoidcomatulidBandera(4).thumb.jpg.1dbaa8592ca222b994f00364e1f46890.jpg

 

And here is another one from the same formation,  but different location:

 

123612498_KTXCRI021CrinoidCormatulidMtSharpGR(11).thumb.JPG.0951ef18b3697441013c217650561474.JPG

 

27873777_KTXCRI021CrinoidCormatulidMtSharpGR(12).thumb.JPG.3acb662d2aaf8463a4400a679116575e.JPG

 

906796054_KTXCRI021CrinoidCormatulidMtSharpGR(10).thumb.JPG.6872eadf8f3a5c8ce3517b76b560ce0b.JPG

 

 

 

thanks, oh, very unusual comatulids... I am just working on some from upper cretaceous of middle germany (more Glenotremites / Jaeckelometra - type), never seen ones from Glen Rose - Formation. I do have some Salenia from there and a ?Tetragramma, but never seen crinoids...

Do you know if someone is working on crinoids from there? I do not know about and have no literature about crinoids from there

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4 hours ago, hemipristis said:

 

@Al Dente... @MarcoSr

 

Gentlemen, I want to thank you both!  I learned something new today.  I have not heard of this species.  I need to track down that reference.

 

Here are 3 additional photos0

 

 

IMG_2749.jpg

IMG_2748.jpg

IMG_2747.jpg

 

Thank you for posting the additional pictures.  I was looking for an indention along the lower root/crown border on the labial side which I don't see (I see mostly root and enamel erosion) which some Alopias (giant threshers) have.  I was also looking at the shape of the lower root/crown border.  Also, the root lobes are much clearer in the labial view.  All the features on this tooth that I see match O. megalodon.

 

Marco Sr.

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10 minutes ago, MarcoSr said:

 

Thank you for posting the additional pictures.  I was looking for an indention along the lower root/crown border on the labial side which I don't see (I see mostly root and enamel erosion) which some Alopias (giant threshers) have.  I was also looking at the shape of the lower root/crown border.  Also, the root lobes are much clearer in the labial view.  All the features on this tooth that I see match O. megalodon.

 

Marco Sr.

Thank you Marco

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Hopefully it's okay if I skip the Precambrian. This is from the Lower Cambrian Zhujiaquing formation of Kunming, Jinning, Yunnan Province, China. The yellow spherical fossil is (I think) Archaeooides. It's really interesting, as it's the diapause embryonic remains of an animal. I haven't been able to get a measurement yet, but it's less than 1mm. Sorry for the poor photos. :)

PXL_20221124_232921778.jpg

PXL_20221124_232733436.jpg

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pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon
13 minutes ago, Pleuromya said:

it's the diapause embryonic remains of an animal

 

I have no idea what you just said...! :headscratch:

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1 minute ago, pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon said:

 

I have no idea what you just said...! :headscratch:

Its where the embryo reduces its metabolism and stalls it's development in order to survive environmental stress. :)

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2 hours ago, pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon said:

 

I have no idea what you just said...! :headscratch:

Like insect eggs lying dormant until spring.

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6 hours ago, Pleuromya said:

Its where the embryo reduces its metabolism and stalls it's development in order to survive environmental stress. :)

in humans, it's called booze. :D

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The 4cm long Middle Ordovician trilobite Ogygynus corndensis from Gilwern Hill, Powys, Llandrindod Wells, Wales. Early Llanvirn, Dariwilian. Recieved on a trade with a Welsh colleague back in 2014. Only a small portion of the shell remains on the cephalon, but the Steinkern is quite well preserved.

 

T52.1.thumb.jpg.4b8da77ff1b7f5c70051f33052590be0.jpg

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Ichnofossils (burrows). Silurian, Eramosa Fm Lagerstatte. We had permission to collect from this material some number of years ago. 

BCDA8B9E-3EEC-4BA6-9524-7EF25FEA46AA.jpeg

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A large Reedops cephalotes hamlagdadianus I prepared from the Devonian of Morocco. 

6635A412-D5FA-4756-8EED-1113E315A0F7.jpeg

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Mississippian of Iowa   Burlington Formation

Crinoid  Size 1 inch

1734254640_zzCrinoidBurlingtonForm(3).thumb.JPG.3d1c606be738951f6d8bca134c352aaf.JPG

 

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On 11/23/2022 at 6:56 PM, sixgill pete said:

Eocene Castle Hayne Formation 

 

found by me March 23 2023

 

a nice brachiopod @Tidgy's Dad

 

Terebratulina lachryma

Yes, a classic teardrop shaped terebratulid, hence the specific name. :b_love1::brachiopod:

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Kottixerxes gloriosus 

Francis Creek Shale

Pit 11

Mazon Creek

Grundy Co., Illinois 

 

Pennsylvanian

 

9487B74B-B61F-480C-89A0-AFAD154DFAB3.thumb.jpeg.47a74e3b5f43e7bdbc22b3bd68305fae.jpeg

 

 

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