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Show Us Your Fossils Challenge Mode: Ordered By Geologic Time Period!


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piranha

The name 'Paedeumias' has been abandoned.

 

 

"Retaining the genus or subgenus name Paedeumias would necessitate either making Olenellus paraphyletic, establishing a new paraphyletic genus, or creating two new monotypic genera. Instead, it makes more sense to drop Paedeumias, a name devoid of significance as a phylogenetic unit, and assign all taxa within the Olenellinae to the genus Olenellus."

 

Lieberman, B.S. 1999. Systematic Revision of the Olenelloidea (Trilobita, Cambrian). Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University Bulletin, 45:1-150  PDF LINK

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ziggycardon

Gosh I love topics like these!
Here is my contribution for the Ordovician. 

 

Climacograptus sp. found in Fauquez, Belgium (Katian, 445 mya)

DSC04562.thumb.JPG.fed5fa227863771d05f9a48d9ea54b5b.JPG

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Peat Burns

Thalassocystis striata (green, non-calcareous macroalga) from the middle Silurian Schoolcraft Fm., Michigan.

 

20210527_224322.thumb.jpg.c99e748ba98c1ec1c91af18e3644d8ca.jpg

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Giant tabulate coral, lower Devonian, Bois Blanc Fm

 

62F5EDB1-7C73-44DB-81C7-424251DDFFC1.jpeg

D637DE00-41B6-4AB5-8028-AD8F85ADE150.jpeg

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Nimravis

Here is a beautiful Mississippian bryozoan hash plate from the Menard formation at a roadcut in Vienna, Illinois.

 

A1B0AC33-18C7-4158-816E-ADC60E4DFC23.thumb.jpeg.317ea946b9c0bc768262d97d62c3edb0.jpeg

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Nimravis

Here is something that you will probably never see. Pennsylvanian Dromopus tetrapod trackways from the Benwwod Limestone, Monogahela Formation, Morgan County, Ohio. I received two large slabs of these tracks from my fossil mentor, Walter. An article was published in Earth Science Magazine (1971) on the trackways. They were discovered by my mentors friend, Dick Patterson, who I also met.

 

6F07283A-C954-4D0F-AECD-75707E1DAD31.thumb.jpeg.6736d89d90654e91064f1c31312d2574.jpeg

 

8ED37FE2-1532-4B11-97BD-4AE953DF1DDD.thumb.jpeg.5f99820d7944e03347153e201d5e634e.jpeg

 

1E65C856-0EAB-43F4-93BF-C188B16F8C63.thumb.jpeg.11540c5e49d0c71dd6593628380dc965.jpeg

 

18526AB3-E702-4C89-8AF2-A3E42AAA2CE3.thumb.jpeg.d7ff482310787a58c6d2dd485a45a578.jpeg

 

 

 

 

Edited by Nimravis
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Nimravis

I know posting Permian stuff might be a little difficult, so I will put up some.

 

Batrachichnus tracks with a tail drag. These are from the ABO Formation, New Mexico. I sent a picture of these prints to Dr. Spencer Lucas ( New Mexico museum of natural history ) and he confirmed the ID.

 

 

 

C9F0F44F-1E8D-416F-97A2-CBF61EDC2381.thumb.jpeg.c55397cb7fad38d1ee2d7f75fc135361.jpeg

 

Here are a couple large plates of Laoporus trackways from the Permian Coconino Sandstone of Arizona.

 

9702C635-EE1C-4E6C-9AF3-1F2DFE23A7F9.thumb.jpeg.29e0008b41da7648bfa3a2be38a48e4a.jpeg

 

8D754F24-A925-4C86-96E1-F5C488876050.thumb.jpeg.d3198e59a821f45ff502e218dff9ffe7.jpeg

 

 

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Ludwigia

From the Late Triassic Norian at the classic site on the Feuerkogel in the Austrian Alps: Cladiscites crassestriatus

 

A952a.1.thumb.jpg.03c182a5e293813577c6f594658b1165.jpg

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Ludwigia

And while I'm at it, I could add this group of ammonites from the Wutach valley in southern Germany from the Middle Jurassic Aalenian. On the left is a Ludwigia haugi missing part of the outer whorl and the rest are varieties of Ancolioceras opalinoides.

 

A984ab.1.thumb.jpg.0d200517b935ac1b1fa981f2ad9eb72c.jpg

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FranzBernhard

Gosau stuff, what else ;):

Hippurites_resectus_AN4537_kompr.thumb.jpg.9af9f47174451caa5e6e4fcb950a90b0.jpg

Not easy to get such a rather uncrushed specimen, usually, they look like this:

Hippurites_resectus_AN4515_kompr.thumb.jpg.68114dac5b1c6f4209b88ab01e9d1168.jpg

Note: These specimens are not from the natural monument in Pitzengraben, but from an outcrop about 500 m away:

Haspelgraben (link to a pdf on my homepage, ca. 4 MB, in German)

Franz Bernhard

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pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon
2 hours ago, Ludwigia said:

From the Late Triassic Norian at the classic site on the Feuerkogel in the Austrian Alps: Cladiscites crassestriatus

 

A952a.1.thumb.jpg.03c182a5e293813577c6f594658b1165.jpg

 

Very unusual certatitid! Don't think I've seen any ammonoid with ornamentation/striations that follow the spiral of the shell itself before. Very cool! :default_clap2:

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Ludwigia
1 hour ago, pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon said:

 

Very unusual certatitid! Don't think I've seen any ammonoid with ornamentation/striations that follow the spiral of the shell itself before. Very cool! :default_clap2:

This is a trait which can be relatively commonly found in Triassic ammonites. Some nautiloids have this structure as well.

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ziggycardon

A Plesiadapis tricuspidens tooth found in Cernay-Les-Reims in France (Paleocene, Thanetian, 58 - 56 mya)

One of the oldest known primate-like mammals.

721353423_DSC04159(2).thumb.JPG.8b112bceeb1faa522ea5a389300609a5.JPG

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Crusty_Crab

I sure do love the Eocene. I believe this is Corizus guttatus Scudder, 1878 from the Green River Formation of Colorado:

 

DGP210420002a.jpg

 

I've always been amused by this specimen as it looks like it has a clown hat. 

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siteseer

A Notorynchus tooth (just over 5/8 inches, or 17mm, across) from the early Oligocene Ashley Formation.  It was collected in a creek off the Edisto River, South Carolina.  Notorynchus is a genus of sevengill shark.

notor_oligsc.jpg

Edited by siteseer
additional thought
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Crusty_Crab
On 6/20/2022 at 3:41 PM, Nimravis said:

I know posting Permian stuff might be a little difficult, so I will put up some.

 

Batrachichnus tracks with a tail drag. These are from the ABO Formation, New Mexico. I sent a picture of these prints to Dr. Spencer Lucas ( New Mexico museum of natural history ) and he confirmed the ID.

 

 

 

C9F0F44F-1E8D-416F-97A2-CBF61EDC2381.thumb.jpeg.c55397cb7fad38d1ee2d7f75fc135361.jpeg

 

Here are a couple large plates of Laoporus trackways from the Permian Coconino Sandstone of Arizona.

 

9702C635-EE1C-4E6C-9AF3-1F2DFE23A7F9.thumb.jpeg.29e0008b41da7648bfa3a2be38a48e4a.jpeg

 

8D754F24-A925-4C86-96E1-F5C488876050.thumb.jpeg.d3198e59a821f45ff502e218dff9ffe7.jpeg

 

 

Absolutely stunning. When you consider how transient tracks are (all it takes is a wave, wind, rain or sandstorm to obliviate them), the fact that they have been so perfectly preserved from an animal during the Age of Amphibians is just miraculous. 

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Nimravis
45 minutes ago, Crusty_Crab said:

Absolutely stunning. When you consider how transient tracks are (all it takes is a wave, wind, rain or sandstorm to obliviate them), the fact that they have been so perfectly preserved from an animal during the Age of Amphibians is just miraculous. 

My sentiments exactly.

 

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ziggycardon

Gomphotherium angustidens molar found in Serbia from the Miocene (around 10 mya)

DSC03503.thumb.JPG.cbb0ef9732e60776ad8cb4d0f8d0999e.JPG

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siteseer
On 6/21/2022 at 11:03 AM, ziggycardon said:

A Plesiadapis tricuspidens tooth found in Cernay-Les-Reims in France (Paleocene, Thanetian, 58 - 56 mya)

One of the oldest known primate-like mammals.

721353423_DSC04159(2).thumb.JPG.8b112bceeb1faa522ea5a389300609a5.JPG

 

Hi Ziggycardon,

 

Is it possible for you to take another photo of this tooth?  That looks like a view of it from an angle as it sits up.  It would be interesting to see a side view.  I have at least two Plesiadapis teeth from the same locality (a complete incisor and lower premolar).  Your tooth looks different.  I have a couple of teeth of other mammals and will try to get clear photos of those.

 

The teeth I have were given to me by a friend who received them as part of a trade with a French collector back in the 1960's.  They were mostly trading fossil shells, but because he knew my friend had an interest in vertebrates, he gave them to him.  I'm not sure if the teeth are found in the same layer as the shells.

 

Jess

 

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Peat Burns

Plio-Pleistocene Sconsia hodgii from Sarasota Co., FL, USA, showing color pattern via UV radiation (right)

InCollage_20220621_000207232.thumb.jpg.421fda5ddeec027d5977341d7b38bc92.jpg

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ziggycardon
22 hours ago, siteseer said:

 

Hi Ziggycardon,

 

Is it possible for you to take another photo of this tooth?  That looks like a view of it from an angle as it sits up.  It would be interesting to see a side view.  I have at least two Plesiadapis teeth from the same locality (a complete incisor and lower premolar).  Your tooth looks different.  I have a couple of teeth of other mammals and will try to get clear photos of those.

 

The teeth I have were given to me by a friend who received them as part of a trade with a French collector back in the 1960's.  They were mostly trading fossil shells, but because he knew my friend had an interest in vertebrates, he gave them to him.  I'm not sure if the teeth are found in the same layer as the shells.

 

Jess

 

Will do next week! :) 

I believe mine is either a lower canine or lower 1st premolar.

 

 

I also see we got Plio/pleistocene :) 
So I'll kick off the next round with the Ediacaran to keep the challenge going! :D

 

A Nemiana simplex fossil found in the Yampol Member, Mogilev Formation, Balday Series, Novodnestrovsky Quarry, Podolia, Vinnitsa region, Ukraine from the Ediacaran  

 

DSC01592.JPG

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Paleorunner

We continue with the early Cambrian.
A Megapaleolenus Deprati, Yunnan - China.

 

IMG_20220617_131007847.thumb.jpg.16baa01d51ae06ac5c6c98053ac8e641.jpg

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The humble, enrolled Flexicalymene senaria from the Verulam Fm, Ontario, Canada. Ordovician.

0F99CC6A-2F36-408A-8F39-3E74A385C2D8.jpeg

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JamieLynn

It's been a while since I've checked in.....I see it's still going strong! Here is a Silurian coral from Oklahoma - Pleurodictyum 

 

 

505790410_BryozoanBlackCat(1).thumb.JPG.74f9e92fa335214668ad6e735c179580.JPG

 

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Paleorunner

Phillipsastrea sp. Devónico medio. D`Quzina - Marruecos.

 

IMG_20220604_134535765.thumb.jpg.0727f99e5c576febec4f304ebe7ef97a.jpgIMG_20220604_134543521.thumb.jpg.4c86f91cd9f2b41b56f4219a763aef71.jpg

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