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Show Us Your Fossils Challenge Mode: Ordered By Geologic Time Period!


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Melonechinus  multiporus

St. Louis Limestone, Mississippian

St. Louis metro, Missouri

 

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Undetermined crustacean (phyllocarid?)

Muncie Creek Shale, Pennsylvanian

Kansas City metro, MO/KS

 

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Eurypterid prosoma and tergite

Adelophthalmus luceroensis

Madera Formation, Permian

New Mexico

 

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Morganucodon watsoni teeth found in the Pant Quarry, (Fissure Fills), Near Bridgend, South Glamorgan, Wales, UK (Triassic, Rhaetian, 205 mya)

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Edited by ziggycardon
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Procerites hodsoni. Middle Jurassic Late Bathonian from Blumberg, B.-W., Germany

 

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Cirripedes/barnacles

Smoky Hill Chalk, Cretaceous

Trego County, Kansas

 

These are 1 to 2 mm in size and are attached to an inoceramid shell:

 

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On 6/25/2022 at 5:55 PM, Missourian said:

Titanothere vertebra

Chadron Formation, Oligocene

Badlands, South Dakota

 

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I found this on forest service land during geology field camp in 1998. Collecting was allowed as long as all finds were photographed and documented at the time.

 

Fossils from the Chadron are considered Late Eocene.  Titanotheres died out in North America at the end of the Eocene.  I should note that older references did state the age of the Chadron beds as Oligocene and the end of the Chadronian (based on the Chadron beds) does not exactly coincide with the Eocene-Oligocene boundary so I might be corrected at some point regarding the first sentence in this post.

Edited by siteseer
additional note
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6 hours ago, siteseer said:

 

Fossils from the Chadron are considered Late Eocene.  Titanotheres died out in North America at the end of the Eocene.  I should note that older references did state the age of the Chadron beds as Oligocene and the end of the Chadronian (based on the Chadron beds) does not exactly coincide with the Eocene-Oligocene boundary so I might be corrected at some point regarding the first sentence in this post.

 

Thank you.

 

I now barely remember being told during field camp that the Chadron is Eocene. It is uppermost Eocene, so the pattern in this thread isn't quite broken. :)

 

The boundary with the Cretaceous Pierre Shale, on the other hand, was quite dramatic.

 

 

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MeargleSchmeargl

Wow this thread has really taken off! I quite look forward to seeing just how long this actually goes :horseshoecrab:

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fossilsonwheels

I think we might have skipped the Paleocene so here’s a couple of  Scyliorhinus entomodon from the Paleocene of Morocco (Ben Idir specifically)

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Titanothere tooth

Chadron Formation, upper Eocene

Badlands, South Dakota

 

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ziggycardon

A bat molar found in the Brooksville 2 site, Hernando County, Florida, USA (Oligocene, Arikareean, 28 mya)

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Carcharodon (Cosmopolotidus) hastalis. Burdigalian, Middle Miocene. From the Lake of Constance region in southern Germany.

 

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Paleorunner

From the Pliocene of Palm Beach, Florida, this pair of Busycotypus scotti.

 

 

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JamieLynn

Pleistocene Tiger Shark Tooth from Galveston Texas

Carcharias sp.

1084972795_SharkTigerPortA(1).thumb.JPG.c8240d1b981e49915cf620e74133ed88.JPG

 

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