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Tooth or claw found in south eastern Utah


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John in Utah

Found this in the Chinle Formation outside Moab, Utah. About 3/4" (19mm) long and 1/4" (6mm) wide at the base

752425108_fossilcap.JPG.b08d79aaee1b4390e6c0a72f1f6ff55e.JPG

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JBkansas

Looks like a tooth, can you get a close up pic of the base and are there bumps on front  or back edge?

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Tidgy's Dad

Phytosaur, maybe? 

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John in Utah

Not serrated on the edges from what I can see. Some more photos below, can't really see the base unfortunately 

 

117900369_fossilcap2.JPG.9b842f3477e4c6a38d6b0957024d6247.JPG233972774_fossilcap3.JPG.2ebc5af7e33e8d4a85daacc75193128d.JPG

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Fossildude19

Not sure phytosaurs had carinae, or serrations.

Looks similar to Google images of phytosaur teeth.

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Troodon

Isolated triassic teeth can be very hard to ID because of the similarity between them.  Heckert describes phytosaur teeth into four types caniniform, serrated, unserrated and blade.   Unserrated ones are fluted with ridges extending from the base to tip which does appear to be what you have.  Not a lot of real experts around especially online sites.

 

My suggestion is to contact Heckert directly and get his opinion, I've attached his info.

 

 

https://earth.appstate.edu/faculty-staff/dr-andrew-b-heckert

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John in Utah

Thanks everyone for all the help, I'm learning a lot. 
 

This site is close to home so I plan to go back and look some more. Here are some photos of other interesting rocks I sawCA9805E0-BED3-4C2A-8C85-8730B09C97D5.thumb.jpeg.3b1075c8c9823c887b855280f1d7ae32.jpeg4DE4AED2-5AFB-4EC3-A24E-B7BA63771E6A.thumb.jpeg.34b3049739f54f0df82dbb174e9abe89.jpeg

BC937CBD-8620-428E-843E-CF61BD5ED241.thumb.jpeg.3e118cd36568722c0f6b4c9a634a70db.jpeg

 

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val horn

I like your site

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That matrix looks a lot like the Chinle in southwest Colorado, a local unit called the "saurian conglomerate." Might even be the same unit depending where you are in Utah.

 

Nice tooth, I'd agree this is probably phytosaur but there are so many new weird reptiles in the Chinle that it's really hard to know for sure. Additionally, the more northern parts of the Chinle are much more poorly known than the New Mexico and Arizona deposits.

 

As others have said, Andy Heckert might be able to steer you in the right direction taxon-wise.

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