Jump to content

Recommended Posts

cngodles
Posted (edited)

Whatever this fish tooth is, I've never found one before. I had a small sliver showing in a rock and spent over an hour slowly air scribing over it and getting it to this point. I'm hesitant to go much further, as I may break it.

 

I considered Polyacrodus for the shape, but I see none with the pitted pattern that this has. Tired of trying to ID Pennsylvanian fish teeth yet, @connorp? Maybe this is another paver type teeth from a ray, etc.

 

For scale, the length of the tooth in the first photo is 13 mm.

 

CG-0499-Fish-Tooth-001-scaled.jpg

 

CG-0499-Fish-Tooth-002.jpg

 

CG-0499-Fish-Tooth-003.jpg

 

Edited by cngodles
measurement.
  • Enjoyed 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
Lone Hunter

Could it be bryzoan? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
cngodles

I found another pitted tooth in the same strata two years ago (CG-0101 Detalodus sp., photo below). They do look similar to bryozoans, but I think the spacing and size of the holes that the zooids live is different. I think bryozoan are usually more oval shaped and usually lined up. The pits on this are more randomly distributed and rounded.

 

But, I won't rule it out. I just feel that it's unlikely with the shape and size of this.

 

unknown-stack-2020-09-04-001-scaled.jpg

 

  • Enjoyed 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
cngodles

I am leaning towards Orodus. The size and shape seem to fit well.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Lone Hunter said:

Could it be bryzoan? 

Holocephalian crusher teeth can look a lot like bryozoa but they often have a specific shape to them, with more sparse, finer pitting, and they are made up of enamel unlike bryozoa.

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
connorp

Orodus seems reasonable.* Nice tooth.

 

* "Distinguishing between isolated orodont and eugeneodont teeth is still a hazardous occupation, often becoming a matter of arbitrary and intuitive opinion." (Handbook of Paleoichthyology Vol. 3D)

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
cngodles
Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, connorp said:

Distinguishing between isolated orodont and eugeneodont teeth is still a hazardous occupation, often becoming a matter of arbitrary and intuitive opinion


I agree with that. Photos online run a wide gamut. Now I need to figure out if I should just stop prepping it or go a little further. Thank you all.

 

Also some interesting features within the order:

 

  • These are a mesio-distally elongated crushing tooth.
  • The lateral cusps are fused with the center. Gives it the smooth flowing appearance from center cusp to the lateral ones. (There is one broken/missing on mine, it was outside of the matrix, so likely eroded away)
  • The pitted appearance of the crown is due to composition of tubular dentine.

 

As for pitted dentine, which is a feature often with crushing type teeth, I have a microscopic photo of this feature. My Detalodus tooth specimen was broken when I found it. You can see the channels that run through the tooth, the surface is at the top of the photo.

 

image.png.7deef4932193dfd6e49de5fc93425f21.png

Edited by cngodles
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...