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Lone Hunter

I'm not seeing anything that can be opened, not even sure I see a clam.  Could you elaborate on the parasite thing in the tag?

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I'm not seeing any fossils here. I would suggest that you post your questions directly here in a reply instead of placing them in the tags, which is somewhat confusing and also sometimes completely overlooked.

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fifbrindacier

I must agree with what was said above. I also don't see any crystals either.:unsure:

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 9/8/2022 at 10:18 PM, Lone Hunter said:

I'm not seeing anything that can be opened, not even sure I see a clam.  Could you elaborate on the parasite thing in the tag?

What I mean by parasites is the bug or creature that died in the rocks turned into a crystalized bone structure like tiny diamonds stuck together where bones used to be 

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1 hour ago, FireDove said:

What I mean by parasites is the bug or creature that died in the rocks turned into a crystalized bone structure like tiny diamonds stuck together where bones used to be 

 

:headscratch:Ummmm........please be a little more specific and show and tell us where you think you are seeing these things. All I'm seeing so far are 2 photos of a rock.

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2 hours ago, Ludwigia said:

 

:headscratch:Ummmm........please be a little more specific and show and tell us where you think you are seeing these things. All I'm seeing so far are 2 photos of a rock.

Okay I have to go through my rocks and get them so please be patient 

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Mark Kmiecik
3 hours ago, FireDove said:

What I mean by parasites is the bug or creature that died in the rocks turned into a crystalized bone structure like tiny diamonds stuck together where bones used to be 

 

The process is called permineralization. Google it or read about it at the library. In a nutshell, dissolved minerals replace organic matter in anaerobic environs retaining cellular structure of the original organism, occasionally forming crystals during part or all of the replacement process. This is an extremely abbreviated explanation. If you really want to know how it's possible, it will take a few hours with book in hand.

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20220825_223605.thumb.jpg.1c51b2e5a372e3d0d0d1c070d44391a8.jpgthis was in these rocks that I extracted from by using several different types of liquid it's not the crystalized type but it was a golden metal of where it to the shape of the creature in I at first thought it was a ring someone had lost my guess was it burned up the creature and took its shape 

20220823_221315.jpg

20220825_223549.jpg

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7 minutes ago, Mark Kmiecik said:

 

The process is called permineralization. Google it or read about it at the library. In a nutshell, dissolved minerals replace organic matter in anaerobic environs retaining cellular structure of the original organism, occasionally forming crystals during part or all of the replacement process. This is an extremely abbreviated explanation. If you really want to know how it's possible, it will take a few hours with book in hand.

Thanks I just think it's so amazing how nature changed it to be so beautiful and wanted to know how & why and how long it takes for it to happen so I can get a idea of how old it is 

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Mark Kmiecik
1 minute ago, FireDove said:

how & why and how long it takes

 

That's the part that requires a longer explanation than I care to type. Have some fun while learning something new. :thumbsu:

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The first and last photos show pyrite. Not sure what those are in the middle photo though.

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I thought pyrite was magnetic I'm not sure what ore it is but it came out of the middle picture I sent with this here I am posting the crystalized fossilized creatures.

 

20220926_184733.thumb.jpg.c9bd2a1417cf0c2c2773831eb75b64f6.jpg

 

20220926_184415.thumb.jpg.ef2ca3580d807b98d79ec3c8042f68cb.jpg

 

16642417165407997339019427838174.jpg  20220926_201445.jpg

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Pyrite is not magnetic and not attracted to a magnet either. We learn the age of fossils by recognizing the deposits they are found in, not by knowing the process that formed them. You can get the name of the formations from a geological map or by telling us the general area where you collected these and that tells us the age. Someone more familiar with the coral in your last photos will give you the name.

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As Bob Will has already mentioned, the "creature" you are showing us in your 1st, 2nd and last photos in your previous posts is a fossilized and crystalized coral. The ones in the middle show a simple crystal vug, probably either calcite or quartz, and not a "creature".

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FireDove

Thanks to all for putting up with my untrainedness did I just make up a word,lol and thanks for the great welcoming 

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11 hours ago, FireDove said:

Thanks to all for putting up with my untrainedness did I just make up a word,lol and thanks for the great welcoming 

We all come at the world of fossils untrained at first and even seasoned paleontologists can only bring to the table those things they have experience with so  they may make an occasional wild guess based on limited knowledge. You have come to the right place to learn from some of the best.

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FireDove
On 9/26/2022 at 9:27 PM, BobWill said:

Pyrite is not magnetic and not attracted to a magnet either. We learn the age of fossils by recognizing the deposits they are found in, not by knowing the process that formed them. You can get the name of the formations from a geological map or by telling us the general area where you collected these and that tells us the age. Someone more familiar with the coral in your last photos will give you the name.

I found all my finds in Pike county Illinois in my yard and local creeks close to the Mississippi river 

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Hello Firedove,

and welcome to teh forum!

fossilization is a complex process, in which remnants of lifeforms are changed and preserved by geology (most times they just vanish over time, fossils are the rare exceptions). On the other hand, geology is changed by lifeforms and their remnants. 

Take for example the pyrite in your finds. Iron sulfide is soluble under certain alkaline conditions. Where there is a dead mollusc decomposing in the ground, the pH turns more acidic, making the iron sulfide less soluble: pyrite crystals start to grow, more or less following the shape of the dead mollusc. Sometimes the shell or hollow bone only provides a space, where minerals that otherwise would have grown microscopically small between the grains can grow to visible crystals, like in any other vug/geode.

Here is a good start on the many different ways fossils form:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fossil

Best regards,

J

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Mark Kmiecik
19 hours ago, FireDove said:

I found all my finds in Pike county Illinois in my yard and local creeks close to the Mississippi river 

 

Illinois is one of those states of the union that has been blessed by being covered in fossils from head to toe. There's almost nowhere in Illinois where you can't find fossils, and if you find one of those, just move 20 miles in any direction and you'll find some.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 10/5/2022 at 6:49 AM, Mahnmut said:

Hello Firedove,

and welcome to teh forum!

fossilization is a complex process, in which remnants of lifeforms are changed and preserved by geology (most times they just vanish over time, fossils are the rare exceptions). On the other hand, geology is changed by lifeforms and their remnants. 

Take for example the pyrite in your finds. Iron sulfide is soluble under certain alkaline conditions. Where there is a dead mollusc decomposing in the ground, the pH turns more acidic, making the iron sulfide less soluble: pyrite crystals start to grow, more or less following the shape of the dead mollusc. Sometimes the shell or hollow bone only provides a space, where minerals that otherwise would have grown microscopically small between the grains can grow to visible crystals, like in any other vug/geode.

Here is a good start on the many different ways fossils form:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fossil

Best regards,

J

Ty so much,  they all just fascinate me and their colors can be very beautiful and yet confusing like this steak rock I call it 20220926_212424.thumb.jpg.803a0c86276dc453b3f8cf9153670c67.jpg

20220926_212338.jpg

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Just now, FireDove said:

Ty so much,  they all just fascinate me and their colors can be very beautiful and yet confusing like this steak rock I call it 20220926_212424.thumb.jpg.803a0c86276dc453b3f8cf9153670c67.jpg

20220926_212338.jpg

The colors are so red like meat

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On 10/15/2022 at 8:08 AM, FireDove said:

The colors are so red like meat

Can anyone tell me what kind of rock this is I found it in my yard or basement where a stream runs under my house from somewhere it's black sand,light tan clay, rocks and roots growing like a plant but no leaves and it catches bugs in hair like fibers I live in Barry Illinois close to Hannibal Missouri ty

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