Jump to content

North Sulfur River 9/12 - Tylosaur Jr. andthe Kingdom ofthe Wild Hogs


Recommended Posts

DPS Ammonite
10 minutes ago, Brandy Cole said:

To put my money where my mouth is, I'll show why it best resembles petrified wood to me.


Are those pieces from the NSR? If so, any idea as to the age of the wood or where it came from? I have not seen any silicified in situ, non-reworked wood from the Cretaceous rocks in the area.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Brandy Cole

@DPS Ammonite My chunk of wood (the redder examples) came from Southeast Texas.

The original poster's piece came from NSR I believe.

 

I have no familiarity at all with NSR finds and very little familiarity with cretaceous remains, so I'm very open to the idea I could be missing the mark.  Just wanted to show the features that led me down the wooden path. :)

 

  • Enjoyed 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Metafossical
On 9/22/2022 at 12:49 PM, JohnJ said:

 

Not sure what you mean by this.  Facts and good evidence educate all of us.

 

Still, if you are confident in your identification, run the photos by Mike Polcyn at SMU and see if he concurs.  I'm sure members here would enjoy hearing his opinion.

 

Your latest photos are much better.  The bone texture reminds me of the turtle pieces I posted previously.

 

 

Thanks for the kind words JohnJ,  I appreciate it. I’ve taken a lot of pics lately, so hopefully I’ve improved some.

 

~

I’ve made my case and presented scientific facts that the fossils are Tylosaur humeri.  In addition,  in the thread, After 90 million years . . . , I made my case the scapula is Tylosaur.

 

Thus far, you have failed to contest those facts.  I do understand   . . .  it would be difficult to refute Dale A. Russell.

 

No use beatin’ a wild hog (so to speak).

Case closed.  Victory for science.

End of sensationalism.

 

:verified:

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Metafossical said:

End of sensationalism.

 

Sensationalism was never on my radar.  I had hoped to present you with some facts and informed opinions.  

 

Does this mean you are not interested in contacting Michael Polcyn?  Does he qualify as someone that might know science?  :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
AmmoniteDelight

Wow chiming in to compliment that sweet vivid orange ammonite piece! :wub: I have yet to find those variety, just haven’t had that level of luck yet! (I have found a more straight shelled ceph in that color with some iridescence!) Its a very cute specimen you have there even if it’s incomplete. I keep spying on posts like this to try to get an update on the river, glad to see the mud is cracking up and drying. Unfortunately for me it’s just still too hot for me to head out there but I’m hopeful soon it will cool down! 
 

The wild hogs out there can give you a fright, ya’ll be careful! I usually actually see a *ton* of javelina group tracks, they come down to drink in the morning. Encounters with wild boar can be spooky and are somewhat common. We heard a really big one squealing making deep snort sounds when running/breaking twigs along the top of the river bank once last year and I just kinda froze until I could tell it was far away from us. This is a big reason why I recommend always travel there with a group, you know, besides the surprise spots with mid calf-deep mud which is always fun. :P 
 

***Also chiming in with some info to those curious. As a fall-winter regular NSR goer: in my experience at NSR a lot of the turtle shell pieces I find there are dark to blackish and mosasaurs a chocolate to very deep dark brown color. (Their teeth are usually black or the darkest possible brown.) Important note is that although this is the Cretaceous Ozan formation there’s also *tons* of pet. wood there of all kinds of cool colors. Theres more than ocean fossils found here! Arrowheads, petrified wood and fossilized mammal remains can also be found there too. What I personally see in the OP post petrified wood, not mosie bone. Usually Moroccan  mosasaurus specimen will have that lighter “sandy” color but NSR mosasaur bones are typically rich and dark. I sometimes a find something there can look similar to bone fragments at first glance (especially the darker pieces of pet wood!) and that can trick ya especially if you’re experiencing sun-blindness out there like I often do. I always bring a loupe necklace and “splash water” with me to help rule out the smaller pieces I find. Fish bone can also look splintery and might look also like darker pet wood and vice versa. At NSR mosasaurus bone should definitely stick out. With a lot of mosie finds Ive seen pulled out there from both myself and other members you should be able to see the small “pores” in the mosasaurus bones, usually they are filled in with a quartz-like mineral, even the really worn ones. I can show you some of my pieces of mosasaur phalanges I personally pulled out of there if it would help. :) 

Edited by AmmoniteDelight
Typos
  • I found this Informative 3
  • Enjoyed 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I think, perhaps, there is some confusion between "facts" and "assertions".

 

@Brandy Cole, I also thought the additional photos looked more like petrified wood, so you are not alone.  :)

  • I found this Informative 2
  • I Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/25/2022 at 3:04 PM, AmmoniteDelight said:

Wow chiming in to compliment that sweet vivid orange ammonite piece! :wub: I have yet to find those variety, just haven’t had that level of luck yet! (I have found a more straight shelled ceph in that color with some iridescence!) Its a very cute specimen you have there even if it’s incomplete. I keep spying on posts like this to try to get an update on the river, glad to see the mud is cracking up and drying. Unfortunately for me it’s just still too hot for me to head out there but I’m hopeful soon it will cool down! 
 

The wild hogs out there can give you a fright, ya’ll be careful! I usually actually see a *ton* of javelina group tracks, they come down to drink in the morning. Encounters with wild boar can be spooky and are somewhat common. We heard a really big one squealing making deep snort sounds when running/breaking twigs along the top of the river bank once last year and I just kinda froze until I could tell it was far away from us. This is a big reason why I recommend always travel there with a group, you know, besides the surprise spots with mid calf-deep mud which is always fun. :P 
 

***Also chiming in with some info to those curious. As a fall-winter regular NSR goer: in my experience at NSR a lot of the turtle shell pieces I find there are dark to blackish and mosasaurs a chocolate to very deep dark brown color. (Their teeth are usually black or the darkest possible brown.) Important note is that although this is the Cretaceous Ozan formation there’s also *tons* of pet. wood there of all kinds of cool colors. Theres more than ocean fossils found here! Arrowheads, petrified wood and fossilized mammal remains can also be found there too. What I personally see in the OP post petrified wood, not mosie bone. Usually Moroccan  mosasaurus specimen will have that lighter “sandy” color but NSR mosasaur bones are typically rich and dark. I sometimes a find something there can look similar to bone fragments at first glance (especially the darker pieces of pet wood!) and that can trick ya especially if you’re experiencing sun-blindness out there like I often do. I always bring a loupe necklace and “splash water” with me to help rule out the smaller pieces I find. Fish bone can also look splintery and might look also like darker pet wood and vice versa. At NSR mosasaurus bone should definitely stick out. With a lot of mosie finds Ive seen pulled out there from both myself and other members you should be able to see the small “pores” in the mosasaurus bones, usually they are filled in with a quartz-like mineral, even the really worn ones. I can show you some of my pieces of mosasaur phalanges I personally pulled out of there if it would help. :) 

 

 

Nice post, informed and informative.

 

Thanks for the compliment on the ammonite.

 

I care little for all these fossils and find them cumbersome.  I’m lookin’ forward to gettin’ rid of the whole lot.  For me  . . .  it is and remains all about the adventure and the learning.

 

I’ve been to “Spooky Creek” twice this year.  I agree, much too hot.  The weather is cooling  . . . but still no heavy rainfall recently.  Here is a link to NOAA/National Weather Service Advance Hydrological Prediction Service.  It shows the NSR River height near Cooper.   If the height is under one foot, I go.  Right now, lowest I’ve seen.

 

I’ve seen dem’ wild hogs up close.  Mr. Hogg was on the upper bank. I stopped and looked at him, he looked at me. He raised his snout, gave a deep snort and scampered away.  Huge animal. He showed no fear. For me, it was too close for comfort.

 

“Spooky Creek” has proved to be fascinating.  I’ve collected over 60 fossils from “Spooky”, some wonderfully exquisite and some terribly rare.  I believe the depositional environment some 90 million years ago, was dynamic and changing over time and distance.  Still a mystery why so many different fossils in this one creek.   I think it is likely there are a bunch more fossil in the “Spooky.”

 

Below are a couple of photos of a “sandy” or “blondie” ammonite.  I thought you might find these photos interesting.   I’m no scientist, but I’ve read the elements in the depositional environment can have an effect on the color of the fossil.

 

1.jpg.d3139fbdc149a5767aff18138d6a11a7.jpg

 

2.jpg.296a4f4b280763378d0783267741edff.jpg

 

 

I also agree that “mosasaurs [are]  a chocolate to very deep dark brown color.”  I’ve attached a photo of a Tylosaur jaw bone fragment in situ, indeed it was chocolate.  When I turned it over it appeared “tan.”

 

 

3.jpg.06257de5eb1e683afa1367ca061a7dca.jpg

 

 

 

4.thumb.jpg.a72f7799087207e50893cf380385476e.jpg

 

 

With respect to the fossils in question in this thread, the work by Dale A. Russell remains unchallenged.

 

I would like to thank everyone for all the kind words, I found them motivating.  Special shout out to @Brandy Cole and @FossilNerd.

 

:verified:

  • Enjoyed 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Metafossical said:

I care little for all these fossils and find them cumbersome.  I’m lookin’ forward to gettin’ rid of the whole lot.

 

On 9/23/2022 at 10:45 PM, JohnJ said:

Does this mean you are not interested in contacting Michael Polcyn?  Does he qualify as someone that might know science?  

 

Again, you might consider contacting one of the world's leading mosasaur researchers (certainly at the top in your area of North Texas), Michael Polcyn.  He could inform you as to whether you have anything significant you might consider donating to research.  

 

  • Enjoyed 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...