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Horse with a sweet tooth?


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Not sure if the identification section is the right place to post this because I know it is a Pleistocene Horse tooth from the Brazos river in southeast Texas. However I’m wondering if this is a pathological tooth or a cavity. I’ve found well over 100 horse teeth and none of them have this feature. I appreciate any insights

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15 minutes ago, jikohr said:

Nice one!

Could it be from an abscess?

That’s kinda what I’m thinking. Looks painful!

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I found one with this too and was wondering the same thing!  I'll see if I can dig it out.

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The main reason I'm guessing abscess vs cavity is that a cavity would be above the gumline in the part of the molar that was in the mouth. These look to be from pretty well below the gumline and deep in the jawbone (which are just the absolute WORST). Of course I'm not a dentist and maybe the terminology is different for fossils and or animals. But yeah, those both look like they had a nasty and painful infection deep in their jaw bone.

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Horses Get Cavities Too!

brush-clipart-toothbrush-5.jpg?w=650

Horse’s teeth have the same composition as human teeth and just like humans, they can get cavities

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9 hours ago, garyc said:

Not sure if the identification section is the right place to post this because I know it is a Pleistocene Horse tooth from the Brazos river in southeast Texas.

 

 

Moved to QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS;)

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2 hours ago, minnbuckeye said:

Horses Get Cavities Too!

brush-clipart-toothbrush-5.jpg?w=650

Horse’s teeth have the same composition as human teeth and just like humans, they can get cavities

This makes complete sense. I’m just surprised this is the first tooth I’ve found with an abscess or cavity, especially considering the number of holes that have been filled in my own mouth. I guess horses eat a healthier diet than I do.

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2 hours ago, garyc said:

This makes complete sense. I’m just surprised this is the first tooth I’ve found with an abscess or cavity, especially considering the number of holes that have been filled in my own mouth. I guess horses eat a healthier diet than I do.

Indeed, that plays a major role! In 40 years of veterinary practice, I have seen a dozen or so caries and NONE have seemed to bother the horse.

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52 minutes ago, minnbuckeye said:

a dozen or so caries

 

Learned a new term.  :fistbump:

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On 9/22/2022 at 9:36 PM, garyc said:

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An abscess occurs if a cavity is allowed to progress. If you notice,  boney proliferation is very visible around the hole indicative of advanced disease.  Abscesses are termed periapical if it occurs at the tip of the root. Periodontal abscesses  however occur on the side of the tooth. So I would term this a peridontal dental abscess!! Nice find.

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On 9/24/2022 at 4:23 AM, minnbuckeye said:

 

An abscess occurs if a cavity is allowed to progress. If you notice,  boney proliferation is very visible around the hole indicative of advanced disease.  Abscesses are termed periapical if it occurs at the tip of the root. Periodontal abscesses  however occur on the side of the tooth. So I would term this a peridontal dental abscess!! Nice find.

 

I thought it could have been a case of a mollusk drilling into it after the tooth was lost but I don't know if any freshwater ones do that.  It's great to have a veterinarian on the forum to notice the detail that identifies the problem.

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