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November 2022 - Finds of the Month Entries


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REMINDER: PLEASE carefully read ALL of the rules below.

Make sure you include all the required information, IN THE REQUESTED FORMAT (below) when you submit your fossil! 

If you have a question about a possible entry, please send me a PM.


Please pay special attention to Rule #5: 

Before and After Preparation Photos must be submitted for prepped specimens NOT  found during the Month of the Contest.

In addition to keeping the contest fair, this new qualification will encourage better documentation of our spectacular past finds.


Entries will be taken until 11:59:00 PM EDT on NOVEMBER 30, 2022

Any fossil submitted after that time, even if the topic is still open, will be deemed ineligible! 

 

Only entries posted with CLEAR photos and that meet the other guidelines will be placed into the Poll. 

Photos of the winning specimens may be posted to TFF's Facebook page.

 

Please let us know if you have any questions, and thanks for sharing more of your fossils and research this month.

 

Shortly after the end of the Month, separate Polls will be created for the Vertebrate and Invertebrate/Plant Find of the Month.

 

In addition to the fun of a contest, we also want to learn more about the fossils. 

Tell us more about your fossil, and why you think it is worthy of the honor. 


To view the Winning Fossils from past contests visit the Find Of The Month Winner's Gallery.

 

Now, go find your fossil, do your research, and make an entry!
Best of success to all, and good hunting!

 

***********************************


Rules for The Fossil Forum's Vertebrate and Invertebrate/Plant Find of the Month Contests

  1. Find a great Vertebrate Fossil or Invertebrate/Plant Fossil! Only fossils found personally by you are allowed. NO PURCHASED FOSSILS.
  2. Post your entry in the Find of the Month topic. Use a separate post for each entry. (Only two entries per member per contest category.)
  3. Your fossil must have been found during the Month of the Contest, or Significant Preparation * of your fossil must have been completed during the Month of the Contest.
  4. You must include the Date of Discovery (when found in the contest month); or the Date of Preparation Completion and Date of Discovery (if not found in the contest month).
  5. Before and After Preparation photos must be submitted for prepped specimens not found during the Month of the Contest. Please make sure you arrange for photos if someone else is preparing your fossil find and completes the prep requirements in the contest month.
  6. You must include the Common and/or Scientific Name.
  7. You must include the Geologic Age or Geologic Formation where the fossil was found.
  8. You must include the State, Province, or region where the fossil was found.
  9. You must include CLEAR, cropped, well-lit images (maximum 4 images). If you are proud enough of your fossil to submit it for FOTM, spend some time to take good photos to show off your fossil.
  10. Play fair and honest. No bought fossils. No false claims.

 

* Significant Preparation = Substantial work to reveal and/or repair important diagnostic features, resulting in a dramatic change in the look of the fossil. The qualification of Significant Preparation is decided at the discretion of staff. Any doubts as to the eligibility of the entry will be discussed directly with the entrant.

 

******* Please use the following format for the required information: *******

• Date of Discovery  (month, day, year) 

• Scientific and/or Common Name

• Geologic Age or Geologic Formation

• State, Province, or Region Found

• Photos of Find

 

 

(Please limit to 4 clear, cropped, and well-lit images.)

(If prepped, before and after photos are required, please.)

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frankh8147

I'd like to enter my Menabites walnutensis. We really worked hard for a small patch of Merchantville formation but this made it all worth it! These ammonites are very rare world wide and only found in a few locations. Prep by Ralph Johnson.

 

 

Date of discovery: November 6th

Scientific name: Menabites walnutensis

Geologic age: Cretaceous, Merchantville Formation

Area Found: Burlington County, New Jersey

 

 

20221113_132644.jpg

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FranzBernhard

Wow, first entry of the month!

12 minutes ago, frankh8147 said:

We really worked hard for a small patch of Merchantville formation but this made it all worth it!

Would you like to give a few bits of background info? How many were found, what else was found, what does "worked hard for a small patch" really mean ;)?
Thank you!

Franz Bernhard

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frankh8147
3 hours ago, FranzBernhard said:

Wow, first entry of the month!

Would you like to give a few bits of background info? How many were found, what else was found, what does "worked hard for a small patch" really mean ;)?
Thank you!

Franz Bernhard

I'm going to get pictures of everything and post a thread. This was the only Menabites with a full whirl I found but I also found a nice Glyptoxoceras and several Scaphites. As per 'worked hard for a small patch" I meant a small patch of  Merchantville formation. We really had to dig for a little sediment.

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Fossildude19

Great find, Frank!  :wub:

Congratulations!! 

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sixgill pete

Great find Frank.

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Nautiloid

I’d like to enter this recent find of mine, a beautiful 6 inch long Isotelus gigas. This is definitely one of the most special trilobites I’ve ever collected! I’d say 99% of the shell is there and the bug is perfectly articulated. Only flaws are that it’s a bit flattened and a small chunk of the pygidium is missing. Complete Isotelus are really only found in a handful of horizons within the Trenton Group of New York, and even in those beds ones of this size and quality are rare. Literally tons of rock has to be moved in order to get bugs like this!
 

Date of Discovery: Collected on November 5

Scientific and/or Common Name: Isotelus gigas

Geologic Age or Geologic Formation: Upper Ordovician, Lower Trenton Group 

State, Province, or Region Found:  New York

 

7D72D40C-15E5-4321-83DB-EF15430B82F9.thumb.jpeg.f59789d5fc04ef6a086a7fe9e4c93c72.jpegCA10E85C-67AE-4E1E-BBA0-51AA03107E20.thumb.jpeg.d271e38b4f2534b5391268ec46531e6c.jpeg

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historianmichael

Date of Discovery: July 22, 2022

Date of Finished Prep: November 18, 2022

Scientific and/or Common Name: Discoscaphites iris

Geologic Age or Geologic Formation: Late Cretaceous Period (Late Maastrichtian), Owl Creek Formation

State, Province, or Region Found: Mississippi

 

In-situ

1383780159_ScreenShot2022-11-18at1_07_21PM.thumb.png.ab23dd3bb03661552c6bc1aae0eca620.png

 

During Prep

IMG_2084.thumb.jpg.c9326ec8b30a674e02da59b4f4a7fa8a.jpg

 

Finished Prep

162671778_ScreenShot2022-11-18at12_59_43PM.thumb.png.50e293d2814c99cbe9d908a332e4cc68.png 359836866_ScreenShot2022-11-18at12_59_56PM.thumb.png.a0602ce1dcf128e53de661ebbf36c8c6.png

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Well, that one certainly lives up to its species name. ;)

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Meganeura

My first ever Llama teeth - still in the mandible! These are the lower right m1 and m2 teeth. The color alone amazes me, plus the quality of preservation is just crazy!
 

Date of Discovery: November 19, 2022

Scientific and/or Common Name: Paleolama mirifica - Stout-Legged Llama

Geologic Age or Geologic Formation: Pleistocene, Peace River Formation

State, Province, or Region Found: Central Florida

 

0100949E-2865-4F84-B5C7-C3FC4150DD29.thumb.jpeg.875c4c720b0f1da13864efa173ebc4b2.jpeg
46F8FD20-C4A9-412C-8790-33C4BC32A0E5.thumb.jpeg.cc53007ead108e6cf93bf080e309c15c.jpegC9194948-60C6-4429-9EDA-68A4C85E6BC8.thumb.jpeg.8cd80bf011ba19c2f71c005eedd1c99e.jpeg

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sixgill pete
On 11/18/2022 at 1:09 PM, historianmichael said:

Date of Discovery: July 22, 2022

Date of Finished Prep: November 18, 2022

Scientific and/or Common Name: Discoscaphites iris

Geologic Age or Geologic Formation: Late Cretaceous Period (Late Maastrichtian), Owl Creek Formation

State, Province, or Region Found: Mississippi

 

In-situ

1383780159_ScreenShot2022-11-18at1_07_21PM.thumb.png.ab23dd3bb03661552c6bc1aae0eca620.png

 

During Prep

IMG_2084.thumb.jpg.c9326ec8b30a674e02da59b4f4a7fa8a.jpg

 

Finished Prep

162671778_ScreenShot2022-11-18at12_59_43PM.thumb.png.50e293d2814c99cbe9d908a332e4cc68.png 359836866_ScreenShot2022-11-18at12_59_56PM.thumb.png.a0602ce1dcf128e53de661ebbf36c8c6.png

 

 

That is a gorgeous ammonite.

 

On 11/19/2022 at 3:54 PM, Meganeura said:

 

My first ever Llama teeth - still in the mandible! These are the lower right m1 and m2 teeth. The color alone amazes me, plus the quality of preservation is just crazy!
 

Date of Discovery: November 19, 2022

Scientific and/or Common Name: Paleolama mirifica - Stout-Legged Llama

Geologic Age or Geologic Formation: Pleistocene, Peace River Formation

State, Province, or Region Found: Central Florida

 

0100949E-2865-4F84-B5C7-C3FC4150DD29.thumb.jpeg.875c4c720b0f1da13864efa173ebc4b2.jpeg
46F8FD20-C4A9-412C-8790-33C4BC32A0E5.thumb.jpeg.cc53007ead108e6cf93bf080e309c15c.jpegC9194948-60C6-4429-9EDA-68A4C85E6BC8.thumb.jpeg.8cd80bf011ba19c2f71c005eedd1c99e.jpeg

 

Great find.

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I proudly present you one of my favorite gastropods of Bulgaria. 

The matrix is made of volcanic tuffs and conglomerate of the underlying cretaceous outcrop while the fossil itself has its shell replaced by calcite and its internal mold is made of the same material as the matrix. Random calcite veins run through the fossil, making its preparation tricky.

I removed some matrix but after some time, I could not continue it further, so I sent it to my friend @laiosx, who he recently finished it! Thanks a lot!

There is still room for some improvement, but I choose to leave it as is.

 

The fossil measures 16cm in length, excluding the matrix that surrounds its cone and it is 6cm at its widest point. It is one of my smallest lachesis, considering the biggest one exceeds 45cm. If anyone is interested in seeing more Eocene material from this place, here is my album.

 

 

Date of discovery: Mid February 2022

Preparation started and finished in : November

Scientific name: Campanile lachesis

Geologic age: Eocene, Priabonian

Area Found: Burgas, Bulgaria

 

IMG_20221122_113335.thumb.jpg.81b8ba7ef7d57f2795ef56bf998f0307.jpg

IMG_20221122_113404.thumb.jpg.c3008cc4aca432e556679db52656e141.jpg

IMG_20221122_113431.thumb.jpg.dea055e81cbfdfba306b3d7eaa73a9ab.jpg

IMG_20221122_113452.thumb.jpg.15905e3ddd3d72e8b2f5ae12e1f0e89c.jpg

 

Here are some at the place of extraction

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1VQhusStvd2u8TG7wFw8u1m-bLeNkdhO9/view?usp=share_link

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EPIKLULSXDDDDD

Seems we're most of the way through the month and only one vertebrate entry has been made. Gonna throw my personal find of the month into the mix! These sorts of teeth are really unique and a favorite of mine. This specimen is on the larger end (45 mm across + 54 mm tall) and is almost entirely complete with the exception of some chips here and there.
 

Date of Discovery: November 19, 2022

Scientific and/or Common Name: Petalodus ohioensis

Geologic Age or Geologic Formation: Upper Pennsylvanian, Harpersville Formation

State, Province, or Region Found: Coleman County, TX

 

IMG_1394.thumb.JPG.1657417fc28adccaf6d96a1f5ca75615.JPG

IMG_1393.thumb.JPG.f408c77d2819cbd108846d626ba315f5.JPG

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IMG_1356.thumb.JPG.cfb6baeeabda462639d68da0d37891ed.JPG

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16 hours ago, Dimitris said:

To admins note: It seems there is a problem uploading photos

Can you upload your photos in an edit to your post?  Thanks.  :)

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Fossildude19

@Dimitris

Keep in mind, was the bulk of the preparation done in this month?

We will need before and after pictures

 

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9 hours ago, JohnJ said:

Can you upload your photos in an edit to your post?  Thanks.  :)

Problem solved, thanks :thumbsu:

9 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

@Dimitris

Keep in mind, was the bulk of the preparation done in this month?

We will need before and after pictures

 

 

Sure! I usually don't keep extensive record, but somehow I have full record of the fossils collected during this excursion.

 

First of all, I need to correct the date of collection, it was 6th or 7th of March, since it was one or two days after Byala, a nearby area with echinoids.

 

First picture in situ

received_695992691435674.thumb.jpeg.a371cf3c4a42bf2f2152edff3929b5f0.jpeg

 

Safe at home. I left it until June since the sediment is worked better when completed dry.

received_4979726598782345.thumb.jpeg.3d266d526f69c4bb41b08eae4da972b0.jpeg

 

I personally cleaned up to this point and shipped to Laios 31st of October, after my vacation in Sicily. Laios received 3-4 days later. The picture below is as received by Laios. It didn't break during transport but during the process of me cleaning it.

received_577135254091852.thumb.jpeg.bf49d77becc69f2f2493ce2ed3da55f8.jpeg

 

His first action, joining the two parts together, using instant glue and soda to create a strong bond.

received_389768183084062.thumb.jpeg.1dfa7f044fa6e5090e5494f7c1b45f2e.jpeg

 

Closer to completion. The hardest part was at the bottom, near it's opening.

received_365886169053688.thumb.jpeg.4219f2f479e4fe2c9eb0a882792df125.jpeg

 

A teaser and record keeper of my beast, +45cm. For future reference.

received_825941721902311.thumb.jpeg.662687994adb1191b3a12f53f0842f27.jpeg

 

Laios working the fossil. I didn't take a lot of in situ photos, since it was freezing cold and super windy on a very slippery and dangerous slope above rocks.

 

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FranzBernhard

I made one fossil hunting trip in November so far, visited three sites and collected something. It is still a very special feeling driving into the Kainach Gosau, go to the sites and - collect some fossils with certainty. This was simply not possible three years ago, because nearly all the sites know at the moment (>10 good sites, with more than 50 not so good sites) were simply not known then.

Well, this specimen is surely the specimen of that trip. Most important is the particular spot I found it: In a small, self-made rejects heap. It passed for a rock clast about half a year ago. Passing by these small heaps again, now the shape of this "rock" struck me. Indeed, with closer inspection, I saw a few fuzzy septa in a few spots (not very well visible in the pic). Not a rock clast it is, but a strongly recrystallized colonial coral of good size, which are extremely rare besides all the rudists and Trochactaeon snails in the northern Kainach Gosau.

Note the small, dark rock clasts sticking to the surface. Here the colony was in contact with the surrounding conglomerate. The break across the colony, however, is devoid of rock clasts. This means, that the piece was probably larger during embedding in the host conglomerate and it just broke during weathering. That means further, that there must be more of this one out there...

 

Date of Discovery: November 13, 2022

Scientific and/or Common Name: Colonial coral

Geologic Age or Geologic Formation: Upper Santonian - Lower Campanian / Afling-Formation, Gosau-Group of Kainach, Eastern Alps

State, Province, or Region Found: Römaskogel-58, Kainach near Voitsberg, Styria, Austria

1788041906_HS_Rmaskogel_58_5268_13112022_gross_kompr.thumb.jpg.ff4916f0696779c51734548e21bd1414.jpg

Franz Bernhard

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KompsFossilsNMinerals
On 11/22/2022 at 10:28 PM, Fossildude19 said:

 

Owen, we need location information, please.

I can see the location info on my screen, is it not showing up on yours?

1278E9F0-BC05-4C7F-AED4-71BDE3574410.png

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Welsh Wizard

Ammonite, Androgynoceras maculatum.


Dates: Found 25th Oct 2022 and prep largely done and completed on 26th November 2022.
 

Name: Androgynoceras maculatum. The ammonite is 2 inches.

 

Geological Age and Formation

 

Maculatum subzone 

Daveoi Zone

Lower Pliensbachian

Lower Lias

Lower Jurassic

 

State/Province etc:

 

Robin Hoods Bay

Nr Whitby, North Yorkshire

United Kingdom

 

Pictures below show after and before.

 

29FCCC7A-6AF0-4C90-B193-6D1C2D90C933.thumb.jpeg.f125c2b2362135b9082282c8be318f73.jpeg
 

3BB4D3C8-AAAE-400E-993C-30A34B9B9849.thumb.jpeg.d0aa6fdf47ce69142e150ec42c8dc1a6.jpeg

 

FD2B6EFD-195E-4A22-B1D7-5CF5E7C01801.thumb.jpeg.81e2235e4c825964693d78701d38aff6.jpeg

 

 

 

 

Edited by Welsh Wizard
Dates added
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Fossildude19
On 11/24/2022 at 10:46 PM, KompsFossilsNMinerals said:

I can see the location info on my screen, is it not showing up on yours?

 

 

That is because I edited the post.  ;)

Owen put the location in his post, but not in the format required.  <_<

 

@Nautiloid

Please remember, entries need to be in the specified format.
I go through and edit a lot of the posts here.

 

I suppose I need to stop editing peoples posts, and let people get disqualified for not providing the information in specified format.

 

The reasoning for the formatting is to make life easier on the mod or admin running the contest.

It really doesn't take much to read/follow the rules.   :zen:

 

 

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As the person doing the formatting each month, I heartily agree. :)

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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