Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
ebrocklds

tiny recent find

Recommended Posts

ebrocklds

here is my latest find. i discovered it while preparing a fossil alligator skull from morocco. i know that shark teeth are common in the phospate mines but  this one is unusual due to its size. it is the smallest tooth i have seen. if anyone can id it for me that would be great. also if you have other small teeth / fossils i would love to see the pics. i will post a few more small things later.

2007081306376235.JPG

2007081306379705.JPG

2007081306371836.JPG

brock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jkfoam

Brock,

Thats great.  What a tooth.  Sorry I can't help on the ID though.  There are people here that can probably help on the ID.  I'm into microfossils.  They are my favorites.  And I thought I had a small shrk tooth. 

JKFoam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ebrocklds

here are a few more tiny fossils

first a dinosaur piece. although it measures over 1 inch it is tiny for a camarasaur claw. it is pictured with another claw that is average sized or just below.

next is an elrathia kingii trilobite. believe it or not i have seen them almost half this size.

lastly i have a unknown piece from the pennsylvanian limestones. i think it is some sort of fish tooth but i am not sure any help would be very appreciated.

2007081308161275.JPG

2007081308169178.JPG

2007081308169275.JPG

2007081308163065.JPG

2007081308166402.JPG

enjoy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gatorman

That is a beautiful tooth and the trilobite is amazing I've never seen one that small. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jkfoam

Brock,

That small Pennsylvanian tooth looks like a Conodont tooth to me.  Conodonts are usually discussed in the last chapter of introductory paleontology text books.  (By the time the Prof gets to this chapter the whole class is begging someone to shoot them)

Conodonts, have, in the past, been considered to be parts of fish, worms, cephalops, snails or crustaceans.  Take your pick.  Last I heard they were considered to be parts of a Lamprey type critter.  The most interesting thing about them is that they are composed of phosphate and in Arkansas they are the source of the phosphate for the mineral wavellite and varacite.  I always use this to bug my mineral collector friends asking them where would they be if it were'nt for fossils. LOL.

Oh, back to the tooth.  It may be genus Gnathodus

JKFoam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ebrocklds

jk

i am sure that it is not a conodont. it is way too big. i forgot to include the picture with a penny for scale. so here it is.

200708130934108.JPG

i have found other fish teeth from this same locality. they are very similar to lung fish teeth i have collected in the morrison fm. this one however is similar to some eocene? shark teeth i found in south america a few years ago. here are a few pics.

2007081309418046.JPG

2007081309411870.JPG

i don't know what this is either for sure but i am always open to suggestions :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
worthy 55

Great fossils!!!! 8) 8)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MOROPUS

the last tooth you show, looks a lot to an Acrodus shark teeth,but I think this were no Penssilvanian...or yes, because were I live (Spain, Europe), appeared on Triassic.Perhaps in U.S.A appears earlier!! :shark:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×