Jump to content
pleecan

Fossils From B. C.

Recommended Posts

Wrangellian    389
Wrangellian

..unless there are other species/genera there too, but that is the name I see written about. Can you put aside a piece of this for me too, if it is common enough? ;) Interesting story behind those - by these fossils they theorize that chunk of land originated in the west Pacific (Asian side), far from the other surrounding terranes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fossisle    31
fossisle

Really great finds, I have to get up there some day

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19    3,635
Fossildude19

Excellent finds, Ed. :)
Regards,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wrangellian    389
Wrangellian

Very nice, Ed. That little black one is interesting - do you have any idea what it is? Maybe Andreas should look at it. BTW do you know of a Tr site at Savona, I think it was? When the Paleo Symposium was up there in 2001 there was a field trip to that spot but I didn't go on it. (Went to Pinantan instead)

I need to find one of our Triassic sites here on the Island but they're mostly Alberni area or further north.. would be nice to fill out that period the Island's prehistory in my collection...

If you're just finding cavities where fossils used to be, they could have dissolved out at some point after deposition, via hydrothermal or whatever.. I get the same thing in spots here in the Haslam Fm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Auspex    1,756
Auspex

... the fossils at this site seem to be in part in concretions.. that is one side of a concretion... and one side of the fossil is all that is there .. and that is the side that was the concretion...

It almost sounds like the site was already heavily collected, and you're finding the chaff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
andreas    75
andreas

Very nice, Ed. That little black one is interesting - do you have any idea what it is? Maybe Andreas should look at it. BTW do you know of a Tr site at Savona, I think it was? When the Paleo Symposium was up there in 2001 there was a field trip to that spot but I didn't go on it. (Went to Pinantan instead)

I need to find one of our Triassic sites here on the Island but they're mostly Alberni area or further north.. would be nice to fill out that period the Island's prehistory in my collection...

If you're just finding cavities where fossils used to be, they could have dissolved out at some point after deposition, via hydrothermal or whatever.. I get the same thing in spots here in the Haslam Fm.

Hi Eric&Ed,

Ed, at the moment I can't id the little black ammonite. Maybe some better, lighter pics would help. I also have to know how big it is. Was it found together with the Tropites fauna?

Eric, maybe this helps you to find out your Triassic sites link

kind regards

Andreas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wrangellian    389
Wrangellian

...

Eric, maybe this helps you to find out your Triassic sites link

kind regards

Andreas

Thanks Andreas, It might! I see a map in there any everything... I was up at the Qualicum Museum today where they had some examples of Triassic ammos. I was able to narrow down the location for that sliced Tropites(?) specimen I showed you (not on the map in this paper).

Carry on....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wrangellian    389
Wrangellian

Nice cluster!

It may have been Arcestes I was referring to - the round ones... I'll look for it.

EDIT: Finally found it in my files - couldn't find it on TFF, maybe I didn't post it? Anyway here it is:

post-4372-0-98001000-1401668506_thumb.jpg

Edited by Wrangellian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
andreas    75
andreas

That ammonite in # 341 may be one of these flattened..

This one is Clonites Sp I believe

Hi,

I do think so too. You should know that most "Clionites" shown in "Smith 1927 Upper Triassic Invert...." are today named Traskites sp., Shastites sp. or Stantonites sp. but I am not very familiar with them. Rough rule is: Traskites and Stantonites show stronger sculpture(ribs, nodes), Shastites finer sculpture(more ribs, more and finer tubercles/nodes. In my Tuvalian strata these ammonoids are named Sandlingites. There is an amount of varying similar species too.

I am also unsure if your specimen on pic345 has preserved its shell. It doesn't look like so.

kind regards

Andreas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wrangellian    389
Wrangellian

That's cool Eric. looks like there is no shortage of ammonites at that spot..

Thanks for posting that..

Hard to tell what they are.. for me anyhow.

Maybe there are ways to get an I D from that kind of an exposure.. I don't know

Very nice anyway

Thanks

Ed

It's odd. There are 3D specimens that have weathered out, in other people's collections (this is my only example from that spot) - but I have seen 2 different IDs on them in the same display case!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wrangellian    389
Wrangellian

I'd say most of us are in the same boat, but I would have thought that did not include the people at the museum (it's like they have only had the time or ambition to put a temporary, half-researched ID on things)... but I guess nobody had the kind of knowledge that Andreas has for Tri. ammos! -Likewise Scott for trilos.

Edited by Wrangellian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
andreas    75
andreas

It's odd. There are 3D specimens that have weathered out, in other people's collections (this is my only example from that spot) - but I have seen 2 different IDs on them in the same display case!

Hi Eric,

I am curious what ID you have seen for the roundish ammonites. It is possible that there were two different genera in this diplay case which look only for you identical. Globose(roundish/sphaerish) ammonoids are very hard to ID. In Tuvalian time it can be Arcestes, Bacchites, Isculites or Indonesites. Didymites occurs later, it has a short occurence in Norian time/Alaun 1/ bicrenatus zone.

When shell is missing or preservation is bad, the suture line of the ammonoid is the best way to get an ID.

The suture pattern(Lobelines) are only visible at the surface of the inner core(phragmocone). Try to polish the surface. Then you can compare the lobes with the above named genera. Please do not grind to deep because the deeper you grind the more simply the lobes look.

@ Ed, IDing was tough for me too when I started with triassic ammonoids. Be sure that there are specialists out there with the same problems.

The main problem is that Triassic ammonoids are scarce to see/find and that there is a bunch of older literature/names all over the world that nobody will review because it is too much work.

Thank you for your nice comment in my gallery!

kind regards

Andreas

Eric, just read your recent post. I only know a little about upper Triassic ammonoids. This is maybe one third of all Triassic ammonoids. And from this third mostly the tethyan ammonoids and from the tethyan ammonoid only the ammonoids of the Alps. This is far away from good knowledge :)

Edited by andreas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wrangellian    389
Wrangellian

One was Arcestes, I don't remember the other one, My memory is not so good! Should have written it down but I had nothing handy to do so.

I don't have any specimens to spare nor the equipment to prep out the sutures, otherwise I might try that. I don't think anyone at the museum has done this, either - I only saw weathered-out specimens and sliced ones, and I believe they are probably the same.

Anyway, you're the most knowledgeable person I know for Triassic ammos in general! If you don't know it, you know the resources to find out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FossilDAWG    1,910
FossilDAWG

With Triassic ammonites there are several that look very similar. Makes it tough for guys like myself to post them in a gallery where Id is required... The Id in my gallery is just a guess based on pictures and what I can find to read. I would hate to guess how many others are the same.

Cheers

ED

Ed, I think you're making fantastic progress IDing your material. I remember when you first started to post, and claimed to have little interest in putting names to fossils. It's astonishing how far you've progressed since then.

Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Auspex    1,756
Auspex

... It's astonishing how far you've progressed...

Ditto, with Kudos!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19    3,635
Fossildude19

Ed,

I agree with the others - you have come a long way. :)

It doesn't have to be about big words, or scientific names, but, ... I think that when you collect, and actually love doing so, there comes a point when it becomes important to know what you are collecting, not for other's sake, but purely to satisfy your own curiosity of how, why, when, and what, about the fossils we find.

Glad that you stuck it out here, and are sharing your amazing fossils with us, still. Thanks for taking the time to do so.

I enjoy seeing your finds, immensely.

Regards,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
squalicorax    42
squalicorax

Most excellent finds Mr ed as always. Those triassic ammonoids are stunning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ludwigia    1,326
Ludwigia

Now that's a humdinger, you lucky guy! Perseverance pays off!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wrangellian    389
Wrangellian

In the roadbed?? This is at your Jurassic site I take it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fossisle    31
fossisle

Ok Mr Ed now I am super jealous!!

Those kind of finds are the sweetest!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19    3,635
Fossildude19

Every time I think I've seen it all from your area, you keep finding more breathtaking fossils!

Fantastic, Ed!

Regards,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ludwigia    1,326
Ludwigia

Ed, I can't remember if you have air pen and abrader yet. If not, I'd suggest you hold off on the prep with the one in post #375 until you find someone who can do it for you. I think it could very well be worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19    3,635
Fossildude19

Wow!

I'll say you did well!

:popcorn::popcorn::popcorn:

Regards,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ludwigia    1,326
Ludwigia

Well, that's a lotta stone! There must be some nice things in there somewhere. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wrangellian    389
Wrangellian

I love those ferns!

Too bad those ammos have soft centers. I don't know what the solution is. I've got some ammos that are inside hard limy rock - the matrix inside the ammo might be equally hard but the shell is no doubt going to be soft and flaky so I am not sure anyone will be able to prep it out without losing some shell. (I have yet to find out as I don't do any prep myself nor have asked anyone else to try one for me)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×