Jump to content
Fossil boy

Help Me

Recommended Posts

Fossil boy

Help me I live in Connecticut and got interested in fossils at 6 and have been buying small ones ever since, even had a knack to chip away at some slate one day and found a shell imprint on the slate. This got me interested in fossil hunting so now I guess I have a small addiction to fossil there just so very. Interesting. I own a very small collection. I live near the shore in the new haven Area and find some amber that washes up on my beach after storms I don't know if that's a fossil but the only bug I ever got amber was just a inchworm. I feel I'm trailing off so I'll get to the point. I want to know where to go to find some quality fossils in my area.

Thank you for reading!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Iskandar

I am interested about amber. Can you show to us in this thread?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossil boy

I don't know how but if you live in Connecticut and want to get some it's at killams point beach

But can yu answer my question?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Seldom

The Precambrian: Precambrian metamorphic rocks cover much of Connecticut. No fossils are found in these rocks.

The Paleozoic: No Cambrian rocks are found in Connecticut, and all later Paleozoic rocks in the state are igneous and metamorphic. No fossils have been identified from these rocks.

The Mesozoic: Exposures of Triassic and Jurassic sedimentary rocks can be seen in the Connecticut River Valley in the central part of the state. These rocks were originally deposited as sediments in alluvial fans, braided streams, and lakes that filled rift valleys. The rifting occurred as the supercontinent of Pangea began to pull apart. Trace fossils of invertebrates, and fossils of both plants and dinosaurs are found within these sediments. Dinosaur footprints also occur in some of these rocks. No Cretaceous rocks are known from Connecticut.

The Cenozoic: No Early Cenozoic (Tertiary) rocks are known from Connecticut, however, Quaternary sediments were deposited as vast ice sheets advanced over the state. Fossils from this time period are found along the coast of Connecticut’s Long Island Sound and in the northwestern part of the state and include marine invertebrates, such as clams, snails, and crustaceans. Many of these fossils are from animals very similar to those of today.

Edited by JohnJ
please keep trades in the Trade Forum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19

Fossil Boy,

Pickings are slim in CT.

You can do some research and try to look around, but,... I take it that you are not yet quite that "mobile" yet - (no car)?

Without a car, fossil finding is more difficult, unless you are able to get Mom or Dad to take you somewhere.

If you look at this postI have set out some terms you can search for, and try to figure out where the fossils are located at.

Good luck!

Regards,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fossilfinderCT

Here is a Bedrock Geological map of CT. It is broken down into quadrangles or sections. And HERE is a town/ county map. Try to figure out where you are in your town and match that up with the geological map. It's easy to read after u figure it out and DEFINITELY helpful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossil boy

i definately havent posted ina while but anyone i had been talking to i am sorry, i went on a long skiing trip and frgt about you guys. NEVER do that again. so if you still out there pm me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19

http://www.fossilsites.com/STATES/CT.HTM

hope this helps, its a link for sites in CT. wink.gif

Keep in mind, the information at this website is very old, and may no longer be accurate. Sites may no longer be accessable, or may be gone entirely.

It is a good starting point for research, though.

Regards,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×