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Fossil Hunting On Coast Of Va?


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#1 Sharkbait

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Posted 31 May 2010 - 11:00 AM

I am new to all this fossil hunting! Does anyone know of a good place to good on the coast of VA? I'm really interested in sharks teeth, but am up for anything. Anyone on the coast wanna go hunting with me and my husband? We just went to Chippokes State park yesterday. Very busy with the holiday weekend, but still found lots of shells of course! Any tips would be appreciated!

Thanks,

Meridith

#2 Auspex

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Posted 31 May 2010 - 11:08 AM

I don't know of any real tooth hotspots in the Tidewater; the Calvert and St. Mary's formations on the Potomac are very fossiliferous, though access is restricted to much of it now.

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about."
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#3 snaggle

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Posted 31 May 2010 - 03:51 PM

I am new to all this fossil hunting! Does anyone know of a good place to good on the coast of VA? I'm really interested in sharks teeth, but am up for anything. Anyone on the coast wanna go hunting with me and my husband? We just went to Chippokes State park yesterday. Very busy with the holiday weekend, but still found lots of shells of course! Any tips would be appreciated!

Thanks,

Meridith


Hi Meridith. Chippokes would be an excellent place. There ARE teeth there. If you poke around in the shell piles that wash up above the high tide line, you may find a good variety of things. Shark teeth, turritela (a gastropod), ecphora (extinct gastropod), kuphus (bivalve, tube worm casings), dentilium (tusk shell), sting ray dental plate pieces, chama (bivalve, casts and shells), whale bone fragments... I have seen a picture of a large (3" plus or minus) megaladon tooth on the beach there. Some folks like to walk the beaches along the James at low tide and scan the exposed shell debris. Going after a northeaster will stir things up, too.

by the way, they have a spectacular huge swimming pool there!! Very few people were there when my dd and I went last year.

Happy hunting,
Anne



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