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Fossil Sites In Tn


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#1 JimB88

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 08:04 PM

Tennessee fossil sites

When I returned to fossil hunting after moving to TN from Il, I found this useful. However, check online the for the actual formation as their info is wrong or out of date in some cases. Case in point, the location in White county is listed as the Signal Point formation - however, the USGS automated map doesn't even show that formation anywhere near there.

USGSMAP
Here's a link to the automated USGS map. Just click on the color in your area and it will tell you the formation (including prevalent rock types, thickness, etc.) The bad - they don't show roads (they do shoe towns though.)

Edited by JimB88, 01 June 2010 - 08:09 PM.

  • dhods0860 and Chapmandale find this informative

#2 saki007

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Posted 02 June 2010 - 11:40 AM

Thanks! I hadn't been to the first link before, & there are several listings for my county. The USGS site is really useful, although I'm still a little shaky on understanding the differences between Tuscumbia & Monteagle limestones, or the various formations.

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#3 JimB88

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Posted 02 June 2010 - 07:59 PM

Thanks! I hadn't been to the first link before, & there are several listings for my county. The USGS site is really useful, although I'm still a little shaky on understanding the differences between Tuscumbia & Monteagle limestones, or the various formations.

No problem. As far as the recognition of formations goes, the description of the formation given will tell you what to look for (ie. if it says there are bands of chert or coal than look for those to verify what formation your in. Also pay attention to the secondary rock type and look for that.) Granted, sometimes its not that easy. Finding a stratigraphic chart for your area can help. A good example happened to me. I didn't know if I was collecting from the Raccoon Mountain Formation or the Warren Point Sandstone (they both had shale and coal.) However using a stratigraphic chart I could tell it was Raccoon Mountain because it directly overlayed the Pennington Formation.
I hope my long-winded ramblings have helped.

#4 saki007

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Posted 03 June 2010 - 10:24 PM

You've been a great help- and neither long-winded nor rambling!

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#5 ghost1066

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 03:19 PM

Nice to see some folks near me on here. I collect a lot in the Lebanon Limestone deposit. Easy access and close by but I am tired on seeing the same critters all the time.

#6 JimB88

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 11:11 AM

Nice to see some folks near me on here. I collect a lot in the Lebanon Limestone deposit. Easy access and close by but I am tired on seeing the same critters all the time.

is that an Ordovician formation? Im on the plateau, so its mostly Pennsylvanian (which doesnt have many fossils) and Mississippian (which is loaded with them.) Though I have collected in the Carters Limestone in Dekalb County before.

#7 Ameenah

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 12:50 PM

:( I want to go out so bad but Im terrified of the snakes, and since I love hunting in streams I cant wait until October :blush:
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#8 JimB88

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Posted 28 July 2011 - 08:57 AM

:( I want to go out so bad but Im terrified of the snakes, and since I love hunting in streams I cant wait until October :blush:

Ive only seen one snake so far this year - a black rat snake. The snakes are smarter than I am..they dont go out in this heat. :D

#9 ghost1066

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 01:31 PM

is that an Ordovician formation? Im on the plateau, so its mostly Pennsylvanian (which doesnt have many fossils) and Mississippian (which is loaded with them.) Though I have collected in the Carters Limestone in Dekalb County before.


Oops sorry just saw this. Yes it is pretty much all Ordovician. Tons of small stuff biggest is some coral and the odd cephalopod.

#10 Ameenah

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 01:08 PM

Jim one is to many for me :blush:
Explore -> Dream -> Discover !

#11 goldste

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 10:42 AM

Hi, Good to see other collectors in Tenn.

Jim - a few years ago, when i first came to Tennessee from NY, someone gave me a lithostrotion ( colonial rugose coral) and some large crinoid stem pieces from a Pennsylvanian deposit near Dale Hollow Lake. I haven't been able to locate the spot. Of course, the state line doesn't keep us from hunting in Kentucky, which has some great sites, especially south of Cincinnatti.

There are some exposures of Orovician and Cambrian age near Knoxvillle, and Pennsylvanian up the road past Oak Ridge, but the population has been growing and the city expanding so that a lot of the older sites are "gone with the wind"

#12 JimB88

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 11:27 AM

Hi, Good to see other collectors in Tenn.

Jim - a few years ago, when i first came to Tennessee from NY, someone gave me a lithostrotion ( colonial rugose coral) and some large crinoid stem pieces from a Pennsylvanian deposit near Dale Hollow Lake. I haven't been able to locate the spot. Of course, the state line doesn't keep us from hunting in Kentucky, which has some great sites, especially south of Cincinnatti.

There are some exposures of Orovician and Cambrian age near Knoxvillle, and Pennsylvanian up the road past Oak Ridge, but the population has been growing and the city expanding so that a lot of the older sites are "gone with the wind"

Welcome to the forum! Theres a lot of great places near Cumberland and White Counties that one can find all sorts of Mississippian goodies (even Paleozoic sharks teeth!) Im around the Crossville area, so not too far from Knoxville.

#13 Neptune

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 04:29 PM

Nice to see some folks near me on here. I collect a lot in the Lebanon Limestone deposit. Easy access and close by but I am tired on seeing the same critters all the time.


I always do a little search of the area on my way through from Knoxville. The only spot I've found is a large field of broken limestone behind the outlet mall in Lebanon- lots of bivalves and coral. I've heard of a park somewhere in the area but could never find it. I haven't had much luck finding spots in that area.

And Dan, I also stop at a couple road cuts just off of 40 in Knoxville as well as the gravel quarry just off the road on my way back to Memphis, as a couple friends have told me they are good spots. But I have never had luck. Am I checking the right spots?

#14 dino35

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 03:36 AM

Tennessee fossil sites

When I returned to fossil hunting after moving to TN from Il, I found this useful. However, check online the for the actual formation as their info is wrong or out of date in some cases. Case in point, the location in White county is listed as the Signal Point formation - however, the USGS automated map doesn't even show that formation anywhere near there.

USGSMAP
Here's a link to the automated USGS map. Just click on the color in your area and it will tell you the formation (including prevalent rock types, thickness, etc.) The bad - they don't show roads (they do shoe towns though.)



I checked the Tennessee Fossil site and saw the following listing

Darks Mill Maury TN 1 km N on W side Carter Creek Rd in phosphate pit Pleistocene good vertebrates TN0067 | , Darks Mill Maury TN On W side of Carter Creek Road in a phosphate pit Chelonia (Turtle),Mammuthus,Megalonyx TN0068

After several hours of research I still can not find the location they listed. How ever there were many phosphate pits in the area which was once heavily mined. There is a Darks Mill Road and a Carters Creek Pike which intersect each other, after checking google maps, no pits to be seen.
I know that you stated in your post that some of the information posted on the web site was inaccurate but it would be cool to find this vertebrate rich plicetocene fossil trove right? I figure with a little collective home work we could find this place any body interested?

#15 Rockin' Chica

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 11:08 AM

Hey Guys and Girls! Does anyone know where I can get a large pice of Coral sliced, in our area!
Gratitude and Well Wishes!

Ashley

#16 rockinthehead

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 05:36 PM

Hey Chica,

Sometimes the lapidary guys at the Donelson Senior center allow folks to use their saws. You could check with them.

#17 Rockin' Chica

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 01:59 PM

Hey Chica,

Sometimes the lapidary guys at the Donelson Senior center allow folks to use their saws. You could check with them.

Thank You! I am actually on the list for the Lapidary Class! Waiting to see if they have a spot open!
Gratitude and Well Wishes!

Ashley

#18 Rockin' Chica

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 04:45 PM

I checked the Tennessee Fossil site and saw the following listing

Darks Mill Maury TN 1 km N on W side Carter Creek Rd in phosphate pit Pleistocene good vertebrates TN0067 | , Darks Mill Maury TN On W side of Carter Creek Road in a phosphate pit Chelonia (Turtle),Mammuthus,Megalonyx TN0068

After several hours of research I still can not find the location they listed. How ever there were many phosphate pits in the area which was once heavily mined. There is a Darks Mill Road and a Carters Creek Pike which intersect each other, after checking google maps, no pits to be seen.
I know that you stated in your post that some of the information posted on the web site was inaccurate but it would be cool to find this vertebrate rich plicetocene fossil trove right? I figure with a little collective home work we could find this place any body interested?


These are some of my favorite spots. I can attest to the validity of this area. But the Phosphatic Nodules will kill you on the hike back to the car!
  • mlambert10 finds this informative
Gratitude and Well Wishes!

Ashley

#19 Ameenah

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 06:18 PM

Thank You! I am actually on the list for the Lapidary Class! Waiting to see if they have a spot open!

where are you going to take the class?
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#20 dhods0860

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 02:12 PM

Hello, I live in Middle TN (Hickman County) and wanted to know if anyone knows any areas to find ammonite? 


Edited by dhods0860, 25 April 2013 - 02:12 PM.





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