rob

Mazonia South Unit

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I went to mazonia south unit with my kids and didnt know what to look for.(what kind of rocks and where to look).my kids what to find some fossils.can any one could help us.we looked on the hills and down the path and didnt find any fossils.im not sure what kind of rocks to look for.i have a boat so maybe i should try braidwoods islands.thanks rob we did find ticks

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UGH! Ticks! I really hate those little monsters!

Beware of their bite; many illnesses are transmitted by them!

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Rob,

What you need to look for are concretions or nodules. If you do a Google search on Braidwood and concretions you can find articles that describe them. I grew up in the far south suburbs and had an opportunity when I was young to collect in one of the old pits. I'll post some pictures tonight when I get home of what to look for. I was hoping to take my kids over to collect this spring when we went down to visit family but rain out of time. From what I have heard the boat is a good idea. Get to where most people can not go. You will need a hammer to tap the side of the concretions open.

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Here are a few of the items I found many years ago. Generally they are oval and some what flat. When you find a "complete" concretion you will turn it on its side and use a hammer to crack it open. You may have to open several before you find fossils.

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I would avoid using a hammer..stick them in a small plastic container and pop them in the freezer, every day take them out..nature will open them with little chance of them breaking the wrong way. The folks at the Field Museum told me not to use a hammer as they can shatter.

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I would avoid using a hammer..stick them in a small plastic container and pop them in the freezer, every day take them out..nature will open them with little chance of them breaking the wrong way. The folks at the Field Museum told me not to use a hammer as they can shatter.

Awesome tip! I hope to make it back down this fall or first thing next spring. I'll remember that.

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Rob,

What you need to look for are concretions or nodules. If you do a Google search on Braidwood and concretions you can find articles that describe them. I grew up in the far south suburbs and had an opportunity when I was young to collect in one of the old pits. I'll post some pictures tonight when I get home of what to look for. I was hoping to take my kids over to collect this spring when we went down to visit family but rain out of time. From what I have heard the boat is a good idea. Get to where most people can not go. You will need a hammer to tap the side of the concretions open.

which far south suburbs parrothead?

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which far south suburbs parrothead?

Beecher

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<--- bolingbrook

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I lived in Lyons when I was a lad.

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I have great memories of picking through the rocks in the drive and finding all sorts of things. I imagine the rock was from the Thorton quarry. I have an uncle that used to haul rock out of the quarry MANY years ago and he would tell me about the fossils that were in there.

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I have great memories of picking through the rocks in the drive and finding all sorts of things. I imagine the rock was from the Thorton quarry. I have an uncle that used to haul rock out of the quarry MANY years ago and he would tell me about the fossils that were in there.

Does Thorton quarry allow people to come in and fossil hunt?

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Lonerguy

From what I gather the only collecting they allow is through a tour that is arranged through the city of Thorton. I just checked and they are taking reservations for the June 2013 tour. Here is a link to the website. http://www.thornton60476.com/

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If you really want to find a bunch of these nodules, join ESCONI (The Earth Science Club of Northern Illinois). They have trips to a private collecting area usually twice per year. I come home with 100's of pounds of the concretions. Mazonia is not very productive, but beautiful and always great fopr fishing.

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Hey folks!

I hope my post finds you well. I wanted to add my part to this thread in case someone is interested. I went to Mazonia today for the first time with the kids and after a few attempts in various locations managed to find the "concretions" shown on our patio table below. I would say 90% of them were already split open (weather/someone else?) and the whole ones are in the freezer per what I learned on this board about splitting them.

I have to admit that I am totally fascinated about finding more fossils and have included a second, horrible, photo of what I think is a fern leaf. It's about an inch long and looks like a modern fern.

I have a couple of questions for those familiar with Mazonia -

1) Are the split open concretions common compared to the whole ones? We found the fern leaf but I have not identified anything else yet so not sure if I'm collecting someone else's discards?

2) I'll search the board but it seems like everyone else's concretions are really clean - ours were all on the surface and have "deposits" on them. I'm guessing there's a way to clean them safely?

Looking forward to having another try out there and thanks to the 40% DEET repellent none of us got a tick or any other bites :)

WB

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Congratulations on a successful trip! No ticks makes it that much better ;)

The ones you found that were already open could be natural freeze/thaw, someone's "leaverites", or both. If they look like they were whacked by a hammer, I suspect a previous hunter. You're right about one thing: the picture is...bad :P . If the green tint I can see is mossy funkitation, then a bath with soft-brush scrubbing is in order (for the concretion, that is).

Welcome to the Forum!

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Thanks so much for the feedback :)

I need to find a better camera than an iPhone I guess... I'll look at the rest of them in daylight to see what we have - I'm thinking I'll call the blobs jelly fish :)

Scrubbing as we speak.

WB

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Yeah the place is super great for fishing. The guy next to me earlier this year found a shrimp that was perfect and wouldnt give it up. But at least I caught alot of fish on the flyrod, and a crazy rash on my ankle, burned for nearly two weeks.

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Congratulations on a successful trip. Auspex is correct that the concretions that you found opened were most likely natural splits from weathering. Although most of the natural spits will not contain any fossils. it is always a good idea to collect them and have a better look after cleaning them at home. I was fortunate to have found a fish last year in a concretion that had naturally opened.

Good luck collecting and keep us posted on any unusual finds.

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by the way im in westchester, i have the week off and plan on scouting a creek bed I found and possibly heading up to north side lake shore to scavenge. Any one interested? By the way was at the braceville trip today and found something cool in a large piece of shale I found in the spoil pile. Im going to try to get a pic posted because no one knows what it could possibly be yet.

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I almost stopped by Braceville to day with my kids. I have not collected that site for years but have seen a few interesting items come off of that hill.

Post a few pictures of your fossil in black shale. I have done quite a bit of collecting in the black shale and am familiar with most of the fish, sharks and arthropods that can be found.

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This is what I found, sorry for the pics, im still learning how to post em and make em look good. The others around at the time could not identify this. Thought it was interesting.

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I am not seeing anything that resembles a fossil. The round structure appears to me to have been caused by impact from a hammer or other splitting tool.

The majority of the fossils that i have found in the black shale have been bivalves, orbiculoides and fish and shark remains. Preservation is usually excellent and fairly easy to identify.

I have seen some soft tissue preservation but what you have appears to me to be caused from splitting the shale.

Good luck and keep searching. There are some beautiful fish and unusual sharks that can be found in the shale.

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