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Desmond

South Gate Hill - Ordovisian Marine

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Desmond

Ok this is a realy easy to see spot with a huge vertical exposier, about 300' worth. It has a broad range in so far as one site is concerned.

It is terraced on several layers some are very fossil ferris and others are fairly devoid of fossil remains. For the small trilobites go to the south end of hill on east side of the road and go down hill to the second terrace with the off white layer of very soft shale aka butter shale. Once there start looking on hands and knees for them since their about 1cm on avg. You know your in the right spot when you start coming up with very small 3/8" brachiopods known as zigospira. There are about 20 Zigo's for every Flexicalymine Minus Trilobite. On the West side of the road about 2/3 of the way down you can find Flexicalymine Retrosa which are about 5/8 in enrolled.

That said decent 1.25"+ Trilo's can be found thought the exposier on more random searching.

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Desmond

Visited this site again this past weekend in a short field trip. I started out with the intention of a full day on the site hunting the small flexicalimines it presents, but ended up a much shorter trip.

I arrived and got unpacked to the spot I wanted to work but then immediatly got rained on...

So I went to explore the Brooksville dam spillway. That turned out a waste since it's closed to hunting. There was a vegitated hillside also listed in the guide but decided not to stop because I had 2 12 year old boys with me and it's very close to the road.

Once I returned to the SGH site My chosen spot had been invaded by some friendly folks from Arkansaw on a field trip. I spoke with their instructor for awhile (never did ask what school they were from) and explained some of the sites key points. By what I saw of their collecting they did perty well I saw two prone flexi retrosa and some other goodies.

I took my two boys and spread out on the hillside I only found one small Felxi Minus and no retrosa but decided to do a better site overview. I ended up with a two piece cephlapod and a 3 piece 2.5 and 3.75 inch respectivly and in OK shape some very nice horn coral (god save me from the dino tooth question...). I also found a number of Geodized brachiopods Lepidocalx I think and various intact specimins for later clean up.

All in all I had about 2 hrs of hunting time but for the number of people on the cut that day I was a bit disappointed with the lack of elbow room as it were.

Still a productive site even with a large number of collecters on it.

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Ordovicious

I know this is an older post but I'm very familiar with this particular road cut. I live just up the road from it. It's where I found my first bugs and I return to it at least a couple times a week. From what I understand, it's such a good spot because four different formations are exposed--Arnheim, Waynesville, Liberty and Whitewater. Lately I've been branching out and looking for different types and exploring different formations and exposures, but this spot usually cheers me up if I looked elsewhere all day and didn't find anything. Along with all of the Flexicalymene, I've found one complete Isotelus gigas. I've also found some beautiful cephalopods and giant horn corals. Of course the brachiopods are everywhere.

I'm new to fossils and rocks, but I'd like to hear more from local people who are more experienced.

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Uncle Siphuncle

I moved away from Cincinnati 15 years ago and first visited this site a couple years ago on a return trip to see family. I lucked out and grabbed 14 perfect Flexis in 1 hour, a personal record for me that I'll probably never top in the Ordovician.

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Guest solius symbiosus

I've always wanted to hunt the "butter layer", but have never found anyone that could provide a location. I have read about this spectacular bed for years. I forsee a trip to southern Indiana in the near future . Thanks.

I hunted the causeway rd. many years ago just W of the Brookville Reservoir, and was pleasantly surprised at what I found.

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Ordovicious

Yes, at this exposure, if it's rained good a few times and dried out--and you're the first fossil hunter there--you can almost scoop the smaller enrolled Flexis up without even looking for them. From what I've read (I'm new to this), the "butter" shale is part of the Waynesville--and the road cut was made in a way that left it wide open. Most of the large Isotelus are crumbled when they weather out, of course, but I actually lucked out and pulled one out from between the layers beneath the soft stuff a couple months ago.

I've found a couple lists of fossil sites online but I've been making my own lately. I always hated seeing more landscaped destroyed for the sake of "growth" and "progress," but lately I've been drawn to construction sites and areas behind new strip malls because of what's been exposed. I've actually stumbled onto a trilobite gold mine in a Wal-Mart parking lot. (Maybe I'll update you on what I find. Most of them have been poorly preserved and crumble in my hands.) I've also been looking at other exposures along creeks and at certain hidden outcrops of the area. I recently learned of an abandoned quarry and am trying to get permission to play around there also.

I've lived in this area all my life and only lately noticed all the fossils. I didn't even know what the Cincinnatian was. Fossils are harder to find in some other areas but here they just pop out of the ground. I'd like to share information with any one who collects in the Tri-State area of SW Ohio, Northern Kentucky and SE Indiana. This is my new hobby and I've been spending most of my spare time with it.

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MikeD
I've lived in this area all my life and only lately noticed all the fossils. I didn't even know what the Cincinnatian was. Fossils are harder to find in some other areas but here they just pop out of the ground. I'd like to share information with any one who collects in the Tri-State area of SW Ohio, Northern Kentucky and SE Indiana. This is my new hobby and I've been spending most of my spare time with it.

Hmmm. With all the talk of sharing vs. non-sharing in the "Forum Ethics" thread, I will share a spot with you. Ft. Thomas, Ky. Go down River Rd. (445) to where it T's off by the Ohio river (parallel with I-275). There is a huge road cut there. Trilobites have been found there. It is a known site to some, UC collects there. I have found pieces of trilobites (Cryptolithus, I think) and crinoids. Check out this link http://www.uc.edu/news/trilobite.htm for a nice Isotelus.

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Ordovicious

Thanks, Mike. Maybe I can check this exposure out.

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PennyT.

With all the talk of sharing vs. non-sharing in the "Forum Ethics" thread, I will share a spot with you Sorry, new to forum, what does this post mean about

sharing locations? Are we not supposed to?

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Auspex

With all the talk of sharing vs. non-sharing in the "Forum Ethics" thread, I will share a spot with you Sorry, new to forum, what does this post mean about

sharing locations? Are we not supposed to?

This is only cautionary against posting the location on the open boards: we have up to 45,000 unique visitors a month to the Forum, some of whom are commercial diggers looking for leads. The risk is that your secret honey hole will be dug-out the next time you visit.

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