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Ptychodus Id Quick Guide


Tony Eaton

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Fossildude19
12 minutes ago, RobinS87 said:

Hey! Who is the expert in the matter. Can someone give a personal consultation? write to direct!:rolleyes:

 

You may consider writing a Personal Message to Tony Eaton, the author of this topic. 

He hasn't been online here in over a year, however. :( 

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  • 1 year later...
rocket

just for showing, a very nice Ptychodus decurrens from middle turonian of Dortmund, nw-Germany, coming from the collection of a friend of mine

Ptychodus decurrens.jpg

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LSCHNELLE
3 hours ago, rocket said:

just for showing, a very nice Ptychodus decurrens from middle turonian of Dortmund, nw-Germany, coming from the collection of a friend of mine

Ptychodus decurrens.jpg

Beautiful Ptychodus tooth.  What is the approximate tooth width and length? 

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rocket

thanks, wide is around 40 mm

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rocket

Another one, Ptychodus latissimus, wide is around 50 mm, lower Turonian, Dortmund

 

 

 

 

DSCN2709.JPG

DSCN2713.JPG

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LSCHNELLE

Monster Ptychodus latissimus!  Beautiful! 

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rocket
48 minutes ago, LSCHNELLE said:

Monster Ptychodus latissimus!  Beautiful! 

thanks, yes, it is a fantastic one. We stored it in a museum some years ago, perhaps someone will work on it one day. I thought about but never found the time...

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  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Here are a couple of mine...looking to confirm IDs  ....Ptychodus decurrens??

 

1312491526_TXITooth1.thumb.png.59c065aa41dd8416faa53f95a53a7244.png1790108987_ScreenShot2022-05-25at4_48_22PM.png.5f18144bbb2610cf97893bea30006e59.png

 

772387707_pychodusanonymus.thumb.JPG.f01ebee0b05a7b66f2a673a7c779c7ec.JPG

 

 

And last one Ptychodus anonymus?????

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_7824.JPG

Edited by rwise
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LSCHNELLE
Posted (edited)

Nice teeth!  I would think Ptychodus latissimus for both.  Notes:  (1) see most recent tooth posted here before yours; (2) typically fewer ridges (six each) than other Ptychodus; (3) sharp cutting edge on ridge tops with long wave-like swaths between ridges; (4) low crown height; and (5) granular marginal texture.

Edited by LSCHNELLE
typos
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  • 2 weeks later...
LSCHNELLE
On 5/25/2022 at 5:52 PM, LSCHNELLE said:

Nice teeth!  I would think Ptychodus latissimus for both.  Notes:  (1) see most recent tooth posted here before yours; (2) typically fewer ridges (six each) than other Ptychodus; (3) sharp cutting edge on ridge tops with long wave-like swaths between ridges; (4) low crown height; and (5) granular marginal texture.

@rwiseAbove is my opinion  in case you want to know. Your question might be better reviewed in the Fossil ID section. Your first tooth is likely NOT P. decurrens because P. decurrens typically has low crown with about 8 to 12 parallel ridges that extend to the tooth margin and then bifurcate. Yours has only the low crown aspect of those four characteristics and the ridges terminate well before the marginal edge. It only has six ridges. 

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  • 2 months later...
LSCHNELLE
On 11/29/2016 at 1:14 PM, LSCHNELLE said:

The UT students said the huge single Ptychodus tooth was not a trustworthy ID as P. Rugosus - even though they can be up to 80mm wide.  My understanding from Shawn Hamm's MS paper is that P. Rugosus has a bulbous and often offset from center crown which this tooth did not have.  This tooth looks more like a huge P. Marginalis because of the concentric circles. Or, if from England, it could be P. Polygyrus. 

 

The dentition is a harder ID.  I would guess that it is a very large P. Decurrens due to its bifurcating transverse ridges extending to marginal edge and due to its numerous fine ridges on the labial and lingual margins perpendicular to the transverse ridges.  

Shawn Hamm gave his opinion on the dentition a few years ago. He first thought P. occidentalis based on the photo only.

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 1/14/2021 at 8:38 AM, Seaspawn said:

These are honestly beautiful. Geographically speaking I'm guessing they're mostly found in the southern region of North America?

 

I honestly would not have known at a glance that this was a tooth at all. Thanks so much for the guide.

 

Ptychodus teeth are also found in Kansas, Oklahoma, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, South Dakota, Montana, and Canada.

 

 

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  • 2 months later...
On 5/16/2022 at 4:19 AM, rocket said:

just for showing, a very nice Ptychodus decurrens from middle turonian of Dortmund, nw-Germany, coming from the collection of a friend of mine

Ptychodus decurrens.jpg

@rocket

Based on Middle Turonian age and the rounding at the margin, I think that this is more likely a Ptychodus marginalis.

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11 hours ago, LSCHNELLE said:

@rocket

Based on Middle Turonian age and the rounding at the margin, I think that this is more likely a Ptychodus marginalis.

 

oh, thanks, I will talk to my friend and check

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5 hours ago, rocket said:

 

oh, thanks, I will talk to my friend and check

@rocket

Ptychodus decurrens can be Middle Turonian at its youngest age. Maybe, the other side of your tooth has dendritic branching of ridges to the edge of the margin. If so, then it is properly diagnosed as Ptychodus decurrens. If the ridges are also rounded with a broader margin, then it more likely is Ptychodus marginalis. Again, without an associated set of teeth, this is only an educated guess based on tooth morphology.

Edited by LSCHNELLE
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15 minutes ago, LSCHNELLE said:

@rocket

Ptychodus decurrens can be Middle Turonian at its youngest age. Maybe, the other side of your tooth has dendritic branching of ridges to the edge of the margin. If so, then it is properly diagnosed as Ptychodus decurrens. If the ridges are also rounded with a broader margin, then it more likely is Ptychodus marginalis. Again, without an associated set of teeth, this is only an educated guess based on tooth morphology.

 

thanks again. Always complicated with the Ptychodus... when we wrote a paper about the fauna (total fauna, fishes had been only less than 10%) from there many years ago we had several Ptychs we did not 100% know... Nice literature about english and a bit about german Ptychs, but not absolutely sufficient...

Edited by rocket
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