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The Burgess Shale In Photos.


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#1 palaeopix

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 08:58 PM

I started this new topic on the Burgess Shale because I wanted a place to showcase photos from the Burgess Shale. The photos in the first few posts are from my other thread on the Burgess Shale but I think that they were somewhat lost in that thread so here they are again. I would love to see photos by other members as well. If you've been to the main Burgess Shale site or perhaps the Mount Stephen Trilobite beds why not show us your photos. Please refer to the other thread if you wish to participate in the passionate discussions held there. Here's the link to that thread: http://www.thefossil...-burgess-shale/


So without further ado here are the photos.
Anomalocaris canadensis.jpg Aysheaia pedunculata.jpg Leanchoilia superlata.jpg Leanchoilia.jpg
From left to right: Anomalocaris canadensis raptorial appendage, Aysheaia pedunculata, Leanchoilia superlata (three specimens) and an unusual Leanchoilia superlata with an Anomalocaris raptorial appendage and oral disc.


Marrella splendens.jpg Naraoia compacta.jpg Ottoia prolifica.jpg Vauxia gracilenta.jpg
From left to right: Marrella splendens, Naraoia compacta, Ottoia prolifica and Vauxia gracilenta.

All of the photos were taken by me while on a hike to the Burgess Shale in 1993.

Edited by palaeopix, 01 December 2010 - 05:39 PM.


#2 palaeopix

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 09:04 PM

Here are some more photos.

Waptia fieldensis.jpg Waptia-2.jpg Waptia-1.jpg Waptia fieldensis

Olenoides serratus.jpg Olenoides serratus-2.jpg Olenoides serratus

These were also taken in 1993 while on a hike to the Burgess Shale.

#3 palaeopix

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 09:13 PM

Now for some photos taken in 2002 while on a guided hike to the Burgess Shale.

Chancia palliseri.jpg Chancia palliseri.
Wiwaxia corrugata.jpg Wiwaxia corrugata


In addition I hiked to the Mount Stephen Trilobite beds.

Stephen Trilobites.jpg
This photo shows just how many trilobites can be found on Mount Stephen. Most of the specimens are Ogygopsis klotzi.

Ogygopsis klotzi.jpg Ogygopsis-2.jpg Ogygopsis-3.jpg Ogygopsis klotzi

Edited by palaeopix, 22 January 2011 - 02:23 AM.


#4 pleecan

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 09:21 PM

Excellent photography Dan! It must have been a memorable hike in 1993, 2002. The fossillize Cambrian creatures that you photographed are just amazing...... thanks for share those photos...
Do you remember the photo equipment used? ie was this taken with a 35mm film camera in 1993? Very nice.
PL

Edited by pleecan, 30 November 2010 - 09:22 PM.


#5 palaeopix

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 09:21 PM

And finally some photos taken in 2009.

DGBP_0098.jpg Another Ottia prolifica
DGBP_0099.jpg Another Vauxia gracilenta
DGBP_0100.jpg Pagetia bootes and possibly Louisella pedunculata

So that is all the photos from the other thread. I hope everyone enjoys them here as they were a bit lost in the other thread.


#6 pleecan

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 09:27 PM

Very Nice Dan. You are very fortunate that BC has such a rich fossil deposit that is world class.
PL

#7 palaeopix

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 09:34 PM

Excellent photography Dan! It must have been a memorable hike in 1993. The fossillize Cambrian creatures that you photographed are just amazing...... thanks for share those photos...
Do you remember the photo equipment used? ie was this taken with a 35mm film camera? Very nice.
PL


Thanks Peter!

The first trip in 1993 was very special because I got to meet Des Collins (among others) and had free access to the whole site for four and a half hours. I also had access to the upper quarry which is referred to as Raymond's Quarry whereas, the lower quarry is referred to as Walcott's Quarry.

I do remember the equipment. In fact I still own the very camera and lens used back then. I used a Nikon F2A camera and a 55mm f2.8 micro nikkor lens. Of course slide film was used and I believe it was 100 ISO. All of the photos were taken hand held. I used the same equipment again in 2002 but I did use a small flash on Mount Stephen. Of course the photos taken in 2009 were made with a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XSI and a Tamron 180mm f3.5 Macro lens mounted on a Manfrotto tripod.

Dan

Edited by palaeopix, 30 November 2010 - 10:05 PM.


#8 lawooten

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 10:21 PM

Oh these are really sweet and very different from the fossils imprints I have collected! What country and or states did you collect them from if you do not mind me asking. :rolleyes: ?
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#9 JohnJ

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 10:40 PM

Dan, the photos and documentation are excellent. This is one type of topic that I think continues to make the Forum better. Kudos.

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#10 palaeopix

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 10:43 PM

Oh these are really sweet and very different from the fossils imprints I have collected! What country and or states did you collect them from if you do not mind me asking. :rolleyes: ?


Wow It's pretty rare for someone (especially someone fossil oriented) not to have heard of the Burgess Shale. This middle Cambrian aged deposit is World famous for its exquisitely preserved fossils many of which were lightly sclerotized or soft bodied. The Burgess Shale is located within Yoho National Park, British Columbia. The original discovery was made in 1909 by Charles Walcott of the Smithsonian Institute. Since its discovery many other sites have been located within Yoho and Kootenay National Parks, both of which reside in BC. Furthermore similar sites have been discovered around the world including the slightly older Chengjiang site in China. The Burgess Shale was popularized by Stephen Jay Gould in his book Wonderful Life.

The photos presented here are of specimens observed at the Burgess Shale site. Since the Burgess Shale resides within a National Park and is a World Heritage Site collecting is not permitted. Please check out my other thread about the Burgess Shale at this link: http://www.thefossil...-burgess-shale/

I hope my very brief introductory to the Burgess Shale was informative for you. If you would like to learn more about these spectacular fossils there are many fine books on the subject (I posted some in the other thread). You may also contact me via the Personal Messenger if you have any further questions.

Dan

Edited by palaeopix, 01 December 2010 - 05:19 PM.


#11 palaeopix

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 10:43 PM

Dan, the photos and documentation are excellent. This is one type of topic that I think continues to make the Forum better. Kudos.


Thank you John.

#12 piranha

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 11:51 PM

I had to dig these out of an old crashed computer hard drive. Luckily it powered up long enough to copy the files over to a SD card. These came from one of the oldtimers at a MAPS show in 1996 and were originally acquired in the 1950's - a good 20+ years before Unesco made it a protected site. The Naraoia looks to be from the Walcott Quarry and the Olenoides, Ogygopsis and Kootenia fragments are from the Mt Stephen Formation. The collector who I eventually traded them to has also traded them away so here they are. Personally I'm glad not to have them any longer - too much explaining and so forth. Besides pictures are worth a thousand words. Nothing particularly jaw dropping here but cool nonetheless. These bits and pieces are more representative of what was laying around in a bucket of scraps for 20-40 years. I thought these would be in sharp contrast to the superior specimens that Palaeopix has been gracious enough to share with us - Thank you Dan and keep 'em coming! ;)

Attached Thumbnails

  • Burgessbugs1.jpg
  • Burgessbugs2.jpg

Edited by piranha, 30 November 2010 - 11:55 PM.


#13 pleecan

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 05:35 AM

I had to dig these out of an old crashed computer hard drive. Luckily it powered up long enough to copy the files over to a SD card. These came from one of the oldtimers at a MAPS show in 1996 and were originally acquired in the 1950's - a good 20+ years before Unesco made it a protected site. The Naraoia looks to be from the Walcott Quarry and the Olenoides, Ogygopsis and Kootenia fragments are from the Mt Stephen Formation. The collector who I eventually traded them to has also traded them away so here they are. Personally I'm glad not to have them any longer - too much explaining and so forth. Besides pictures are worth a thousand words. Nothing particularly jaw dropping here but cool nonetheless. These bits and pieces are more representative of what was laying around in a bucket of scraps for 20-40 years. I thought these would be in sharp contrast to the superior specimens that Palaeopix has been gracious enough to share with us - Thank you Dan and keep 'em coming! ;)


Thanks for posting... images from Burgess is always interesting to view.

#14 pleecan

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 05:43 AM

Thanks Peter!

The first trip in 1993 was very special because I got to meet Des Collins (among others) and had free access to the whole site for four and a half hours. I also had access to the upper quarry which is referred to as Raymond's Quarry whereas, the lower quarry is referred to as Walcott's Quarry.

I do remember the equipment. In fact I still own the very camera and lens used back then. I used a Nikon F2A camera and a 55mm f2.8 micro nikkor lens. Of course slide film was used and I believe it was 100 ISO. All of the photos were taken hand held. I used the same equipment again in 2002 but I did use a small flash on Mount Stephen. Of course the photos taken in 2009 were made with a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XSI and a Tamron 180mm f3.5 Macro lens mounted on a Manfrotto tripod.

Dan


Thanks for the information Dan! I am always interested in photographic equipment type for a given application. Very nice Dan!
Peter

#15 glacialerratic

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 06:35 AM

Ahhh, the stuff dreams are made of...
Thanks, Paleopix & Piranha!

#16 Terry Dactyll

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 10:50 AM

Amazing material....Thanks for posting the images..... I cant believe it was all left to rot away.... the stupidity is staggering....

Cheers Steve... And Welcome if your a New Member... :)


#17 Shamalama

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 11:58 AM

Dan,

Were the pictures you took of specimens just lying out on the scree field or were they specimens destined for the lab and collections? I'm curious as it seems a waste to let nice fossils weather away just because it's a protected site.

-Dave

 

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#18 palaeopix

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 01:05 PM

Dave,

I guess I should have been a bit more clear about the fossils. Most of the specimens in the photos from 1993 were slated for the collections at the Royal Ontario Museum. A few things like the Anomalocaris appendage and the Marrella are pretty common at the Burgess Shale and were found in the talus so they would have been left by the ROM. The Wiwaxia from 2002 is still at the Burgess Shale site locked in a steel box with other representative specimens to be used for display purposes during guided hikes. All of the remaining Burgess specimens were found laying in the talus. So yes they are left to the ravages of weathering. Occasionally a great or rare specimen is found in the talus and added to the lock box but many of the specimens are relatively common or an excess of them have already been collected by the ROM and/or Smithsonian.

The Trilobites from Mount Stephen are a combination of talus finds during the hike or came from another lock box at the site. Mount Stephen is an amazing place as virtually every piece of shale has at least one trilobite (or piece of trilobite) on it. The number of trilobites found at the site is astounding too, but I'll not get into that here.

For more insight on the management or mismanagement (depending on how you see things) of the Burgess Shale see this link: http://www.thefossil...-burgess-shale/

Dan

Edited by palaeopix, 01 December 2010 - 01:06 PM.


#19 fossil man

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 01:48 PM

I reciently purchased a Cannon rebel and was wondering how you liked yours, have you had any problems with it yet, and i am new to using fancy cameras like this so is there any books that you would recommend to help learn how to better utilize the camera?

Thanks Fossil man


Thanks Peter!

The first trip in 1993 was very special because I got to meet Des Collins (among others) and had free access to the whole site for four and a half hours. I also had access to the upper quarry which is referred to as Raymond's Quarry whereas, the lower quarry is referred to as Walcott's Quarry.

I do remember the equipment. In fact I still own the very camera and lens used back then. I used a Nikon F2A camera and a 55mm f2.8 micro nikkor lens. Of course slide film was used and I believe it was 100 ISO. All of the photos were taken hand held. I used the same equipment again in 2002 but I did use a small flash on Mount Stephen. Of course the photos taken in 2009 were made with a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XSI and a Tamron 180mm f3.5 Macro lens mounted on a Manfrotto tripod.

Dan



#20 grampa dino

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 04:42 PM

That place and your photo's are great, lets see more if you have some please :o



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