palaeopix

The Burgess Shale In Photos.

83 posts in this topic

I started this new topic on the Burgess Shale because I wanted a place to showcase photos from the Burgess Shale. The photos in the first few posts are from my other thread on the Burgess Shale but I think that they were somewhat lost in that thread so here they are again. I would love to see photos by other members as well. If you've been to the main Burgess Shale site or perhaps the Mount Stephen Trilobite beds why not show us your photos. Please refer to the other thread if you wish to participate in the passionate discussions held there. Here's the link to that thread: http://www.thefossil...-burgess-shale/

So without further ado here are the photos.

post-2629-043832000 1291167760_thumb.jpgpost-2629-088050200 1291167764_thumb.jpgpost-2629-000373900 1291167786_thumb.jpgpost-2629-067170500 1291167789_thumb.jpg

From left to right: Anomalocaris canadensis raptorial appendage, Aysheaia pedunculata, Leanchoilia superlata (three specimens) and an unusual Leanchoilia superlata with an Anomalocaris raptorial appendage and oral disc.

post-2629-094153500 1291167793_thumb.jpgpost-2629-076028200 1291167797_thumb.jpgpost-2629-090342400 1291168268_thumb.jpgpost-2629-027762700 1291168283_thumb.jpg

From left to right: Marrella splendens, Naraoia compacta, Ottoia prolifica and Vauxia gracilenta.

All of the photos were taken by me while on a hike to the Burgess Shale in 1993.

Edited by palaeopix

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Here are some more photos.

post-2629-017910000 1291168871_thumb.jpgpost-2629-078556700 1291168879_thumb.jpgpost-2629-084350100 1291168875_thumb.jpg Waptia fieldensis

post-2629-080370200 1291168853_thumb.jpgpost-2629-071646400 1291168849_thumb.jpg Olenoides serratus

These were also taken in 1993 while on a hike to the Burgess Shale.

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Now for some photos taken in 2002 while on a guided hike to the Burgess Shale.

post-2629-005019900 1291169231_thumb.jpg Chancia palliseri.

post-2629-018001700 1291169217_thumb.jpg Wiwaxia corrugata

In addition I hiked to the Mount Stephen Trilobite beds.

post-2629-081213500 1291169378_thumb.jpg This photo shows just how many trilobites can be found on Mount Stephen. Most of the specimens are Ogygopsis klotzi.

post-2629-080052800 1291169365_thumb.jpgpost-2629-031669200 1291169370_thumb.jpgpost-2629-079035500 1291169374_thumb.jpg Ogygopsis klotzi

Edited by palaeopix

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Excellent photography Dan! It must have been a memorable hike in 1993, 2002. The fossillize Cambrian creatures that you photographed are just amazing...... thanks for share those photos...

Do you remember the photo equipment used? ie was this taken with a 35mm film camera in 1993? Very nice.

PL

Edited by pleecan

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And finally some photos taken in 2009.

post-2629-068092700 1291169682_thumb.jpg Another Ottia prolifica

post-2629-023858500 1291169687_thumb.jpg Another Vauxia gracilenta

post-2629-073697100 1291169691_thumb.jpg Pagetia bootes and possibly Louisella pedunculata

So that is all the photos from the other thread. I hope everyone enjoys them here as they were a bit lost in the other thread.

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Very Nice Dan. You are very fortunate that BC has such a rich fossil deposit that is world class.

PL

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Excellent photography Dan! It must have been a memorable hike in 1993. The fossillize Cambrian creatures that you photographed are just amazing...... thanks for share those photos...

Do you remember the photo equipment used? ie was this taken with a 35mm film camera? Very nice.

PL

Thanks Peter!

The first trip in 1993 was very special because I got to meet Des Collins (among others) and had free access to the whole site for four and a half hours. I also had access to the upper quarry which is referred to as Raymond's Quarry whereas, the lower quarry is referred to as Walcott's Quarry.

I do remember the equipment. In fact I still own the very camera and lens used back then. I used a Nikon F2A camera and a 55mm f2.8 micro nikkor lens. Of course slide film was used and I believe it was 100 ISO. All of the photos were taken hand held. I used the same equipment again in 2002 but I did use a small flash on Mount Stephen. Of course the photos taken in 2009 were made with a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XSI and a Tamron 180mm f3.5 Macro lens mounted on a Manfrotto tripod.

Dan

Edited by palaeopix

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Oh these are really sweet and very different from the fossils imprints I have collected! What country and or states did you collect them from if you do not mind me asking. :rolleyes: ?

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Dan, the photos and documentation are excellent. This is one type of topic that I think continues to make the Forum better. Kudos.

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Oh these are really sweet and very different from the fossils imprints I have collected! What country and or states did you collect them from if you do not mind me asking. :rolleyes: ?

Wow It's pretty rare for someone (especially someone fossil oriented) not to have heard of the Burgess Shale. This middle Cambrian aged deposit is World famous for its exquisitely preserved fossils many of which were lightly sclerotized or soft bodied. The Burgess Shale is located within Yoho National Park, British Columbia. The original discovery was made in 1909 by Charles Walcott of the Smithsonian Institute. Since its discovery many other sites have been located within Yoho and Kootenay National Parks, both of which reside in BC. Furthermore similar sites have been discovered around the world including the slightly older Chengjiang site in China. The Burgess Shale was popularized by Stephen Jay Gould in his book Wonderful Life.

The photos presented here are of specimens observed at the Burgess Shale site. Since the Burgess Shale resides within a National Park and is a World Heritage Site collecting is not permitted. Please check out my other thread about the Burgess Shale at this link: http://www.thefossil...-burgess-shale/

I hope my very brief introductory to the Burgess Shale was informative for you. If you would like to learn more about these spectacular fossils there are many fine books on the subject (I posted some in the other thread). You may also contact me via the Personal Messenger if you have any further questions.

Dan

Edited by palaeopix

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Dan, the photos and documentation are excellent. This is one type of topic that I think continues to make the Forum better. Kudos.

Thank you John.

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I had to dig these out of an old crashed computer hard drive. Luckily it powered up long enough to copy the files over to a SD card. These came from one of the oldtimers at a MAPS show in 1996 and were originally acquired in the 1950's - a good 20+ years before Unesco made it a protected site. The Naraoia looks to be from the Walcott Quarry and the Olenoides, Ogygopsis and Kootenia fragments are from the Mt Stephen Formation. The collector who I eventually traded them to has also traded them away so here they are. Personally I'm glad not to have them any longer - too much explaining and so forth. Besides pictures are worth a thousand words. Nothing particularly jaw dropping here but cool nonetheless. These bits and pieces are more representative of what was laying around in a bucket of scraps for 20-40 years. I thought these would be in sharp contrast to the superior specimens that Palaeopix has been gracious enough to share with us - Thank you Dan and keep 'em coming! ;)

post-4301-026222300 1291177694_thumb.jpg

post-4301-063045400 1291177711_thumb.jpg

Edited by piranha

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I had to dig these out of an old crashed computer hard drive. Luckily it powered up long enough to copy the files over to a SD card. These came from one of the oldtimers at a MAPS show in 1996 and were originally acquired in the 1950's - a good 20+ years before Unesco made it a protected site. The Naraoia looks to be from the Walcott Quarry and the Olenoides, Ogygopsis and Kootenia fragments are from the Mt Stephen Formation. The collector who I eventually traded them to has also traded them away so here they are. Personally I'm glad not to have them any longer - too much explaining and so forth. Besides pictures are worth a thousand words. Nothing particularly jaw dropping here but cool nonetheless. These bits and pieces are more representative of what was laying around in a bucket of scraps for 20-40 years. I thought these would be in sharp contrast to the superior specimens that Palaeopix has been gracious enough to share with us - Thank you Dan and keep 'em coming! ;)

Thanks for posting... images from Burgess is always interesting to view.

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Thanks Peter!

The first trip in 1993 was very special because I got to meet Des Collins (among others) and had free access to the whole site for four and a half hours. I also had access to the upper quarry which is referred to as Raymond's Quarry whereas, the lower quarry is referred to as Walcott's Quarry.

I do remember the equipment. In fact I still own the very camera and lens used back then. I used a Nikon F2A camera and a 55mm f2.8 micro nikkor lens. Of course slide film was used and I believe it was 100 ISO. All of the photos were taken hand held. I used the same equipment again in 2002 but I did use a small flash on Mount Stephen. Of course the photos taken in 2009 were made with a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XSI and a Tamron 180mm f3.5 Macro lens mounted on a Manfrotto tripod.

Dan

Thanks for the information Dan! I am always interested in photographic equipment type for a given application. Very nice Dan!

Peter

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Ahhh, the stuff dreams are made of...

Thanks, Paleopix & Piranha!

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Amazing material....Thanks for posting the images..... I cant believe it was all left to rot away.... the stupidity is staggering....

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Dan,

Were the pictures you took of specimens just lying out on the scree field or were they specimens destined for the lab and collections? I'm curious as it seems a waste to let nice fossils weather away just because it's a protected site.

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Dave,

I guess I should have been a bit more clear about the fossils. Most of the specimens in the photos from 1993 were slated for the collections at the Royal Ontario Museum. A few things like the Anomalocaris appendage and the Marrella are pretty common at the Burgess Shale and were found in the talus so they would have been left by the ROM. The Wiwaxia from 2002 is still at the Burgess Shale site locked in a steel box with other representative specimens to be used for display purposes during guided hikes. All of the remaining Burgess specimens were found laying in the talus. So yes they are left to the ravages of weathering. Occasionally a great or rare specimen is found in the talus and added to the lock box but many of the specimens are relatively common or an excess of them have already been collected by the ROM and/or Smithsonian.

The Trilobites from Mount Stephen are a combination of talus finds during the hike or came from another lock box at the site. Mount Stephen is an amazing place as virtually every piece of shale has at least one trilobite (or piece of trilobite) on it. The number of trilobites found at the site is astounding too, but I'll not get into that here.

For more insight on the management or mismanagement (depending on how you see things) of the Burgess Shale see this link: http://www.thefossil...-burgess-shale/

Dan

Edited by palaeopix

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I reciently purchased a Cannon rebel and was wondering how you liked yours, have you had any problems with it yet, and i am new to using fancy cameras like this so is there any books that you would recommend to help learn how to better utilize the camera?

Thanks Fossil man

Thanks Peter!

The first trip in 1993 was very special because I got to meet Des Collins (among others) and had free access to the whole site for four and a half hours. I also had access to the upper quarry which is referred to as Raymond's Quarry whereas, the lower quarry is referred to as Walcott's Quarry.

I do remember the equipment. In fact I still own the very camera and lens used back then. I used a Nikon F2A camera and a 55mm f2.8 micro nikkor lens. Of course slide film was used and I believe it was 100 ISO. All of the photos were taken hand held. I used the same equipment again in 2002 but I did use a small flash on Mount Stephen. Of course the photos taken in 2009 were made with a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XSI and a Tamron 180mm f3.5 Macro lens mounted on a Manfrotto tripod.

Dan

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That place and your photo's are great, lets see more if you have some please :o

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That place and your photo's are great, lets see more if you have some please :o

Thanks grampa,

I am presently discussing the use of some of the ROM's copyrighted images. Hopefully I will be able to post some really special specimens they have.

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Amazing material....Thanks for posting the images..... I cant believe it was all left to rot away.... the stupidity is staggering....

Not all of the material "was left to rot away". Hundreds of thousands of specimens have been collected and curated by both the Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto, ON) and Smithsonian Institute (Washington, DC). Additionally many smaller collections are held at the Field Visitor Centre (Yoho National Park), the Royal British Columbia Museum (VIctoria, BC), the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology (Drumheller, AB) and the University of Alberta (Edmonton, AB) to name but a few.

To read more about this topic please see this link but be warned that this is a hot topic: http://www.thefossil...-burgess-shale/

Dan

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Hello Dan,

This and your other thread are highly interesting and I hope to see them continue on. Great pics too. I can't really participate in the discussions, since I'm not too familiar with all the background details, both scientific and political, but I find it all very informative. That's all on the other side of the world for me and quite unreachable at the moment. It must be a great feeling walking over and among these layers.

Best wishes, Roger

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Wow It's pretty rare for someone (especially someone fossil oriented) not to have heard of the Burgess Shale. This middle Cambrian aged deposit is World famous for its exquisitely preserved fossils many of which were lightly sclerotized or soft bodied. The Burgess Shale is located within Yoho National Park, British Columbia. The original discovery was made in 1909 by Charles Walcott of the Smithsonian Institute. Since its discovery many other sites have been located within Yoho and Kootenay National Parks, both of which reside in BC. Furthermore similar sites have been discovered around the world including the slightly older Chengjiang site in China. The Burgess Shale was popularized by Stephen Jay Gould in his book Wonderful Life.

The photos presented here are of specimens observed at the Burgess Shale site. Since the Burgess Shale resides within a National Park and is a World Heritage Site collecting is not permitted. Please check out my other thread about the Burgess Shale at this link: http://www.thefossil...-burgess-shale/

I hope my very brief introductory to the Burgess Shale was informative for you. If you would like to learn more about these spectacular fossils there are many fine books on the subject (I posted some in the other thread). You may also contact me via the Personal Messenger if you have any further questions.

Dan

Dan,

Thank you very much for the information you have shared I will make note of it seriously and do research on it. As you have pointed out my lack of knowledge (Wow It's pretty rare for someone (especially someone fossil oriented) not to have heard of the Burgess Shale.) I feel the need to defend my short comings as to my lack of knowledge. Though my degree is in Anthropology my love has been in the area of collecting fossils since I have done it for more than thirty years my research has been limited to the areas we collected. My collecting has been in NC to Florida and the states in between along with Alabama. For the last three years we have been going to Alabama and this is where I have found imprints to be of great interest to me. Research into imprints has just begun compared to the fossils which I have collected for years previous. But any book that you feel would be informative would be of great interest as I am always looking to increase my library collection. As you said collecting is no longer permitted and not a location I would plan to go for that reason although I would enjoy the reading books on the site all the same. Any book you could recommend would be of interest to me. Thank you kindly for the information in your thread it was very well read by me.

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Dan,

Thank you very much for the information you have shared I will make note of it seriously and do research on it. As you have pointed out my lack of knowledge (Wow It's pretty rare for someone (especially someone fossil oriented) not to have heard of the Burgess Shale.) I feel the need to defend my short comings as to my lack of knowledge. Though my degree is in Anthropology my love has been in the area of collecting fossils since I have done it for more than thirty years my research has been limited to the areas we collected. My collecting has been in NC to Florida and the states in between along with Alabama. For the last three years we have been going to Alabama and this is where I have found imprints to be of great interest to me. Research into imprints has just begun compared to the fossils which I have collected for years previous. But any book that you feel would be informative would be of great interest as I am always looking to increase my library collection. As you said collecting is no longer permitted and not a location I would plan to go for that reason although I would enjoy the reading books on the site all the same. Any book you could recommend would be of interest to me. Thank you kindly for the information in your thread it was very well read by me.

Iawooten,

I assure you I meant no disrespect to you in my previous post. I guess I was truly surprised that such a high profile site as the Burgess Shale might go undiscovered by a fellow fossil enthusiast. Please accept my apologies if I made you feel uncomfortable about your lack of knowledge on the Burgess Shale, that was never my intention.

I envy you now that you have an opportunity to learn more about this most special of Cambrian sites. I still remember the sense of awe the first time I picked up Stephen Jay Gould's book Wonderful Life. If I were to recommend some books to read his would easily be at the top of the list because of his genuine enthusiasm toward the weird and wonderful fossils of the Burgess Shale.

Next I would choose one of the following titles:

post-2629-052370700 1291264100_thumb.jpgpost-2629-064774600 1291264093_thumb.jpgpost-2629-023240200 1291264097_thumb.jpgpost-2629-066026400 1291264090_thumb.jpgpost-2629-070017100 1291264102_thumb.jpg

The first two are introductory in nature while the third and fourth are a bit more specialized and have numerous plates, diagrams and descriptions of the Burgess Shale fossils. I would probably choose the last book to read as a comparison to Gould's book. Why not check them out a your local library? Enjoy yourself as you're in for a treat. And do let me know how you get on with your new discovery.

Best wishes.

Dan

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