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Plant Fossils From Bc's Wine Country


Heliophyllum360

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Heliophyllum360

Seeing how the forum has a lot of Ontario fossils, I thought I would contribute by posting some plant fossils from British Columbia.

I found these fossils near the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory near the city of Penticton on my last field school excursion. I hope I could go back there again sometime in the future as these two fossils show that the outcrop I found them from look like a very promising spot for some really good stuff similar to these.

post-4609-0-94061700-1293666723_thumb.jpg

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Nice plants, I found similar plates at that locality many years ago. There is also a road cut in Summerland that had some cool plants

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Neat finds. :)

Thanks for showing them to us.

Any ideas on what they are?

Regards,

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Seeing how the forum has a lot of Ontario fossils, I thought I would contribute by posting some plant fossils from British Columbia. I found these fossils near the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory near the city of Penticton on my last field school excursion. I hope I could go back there again sometime in the future as these two fossils show that the outcrop I found them from look like a very promising spot for some really good stuff similar to these.

Greetings and Welcome to TFF from Oregon! :) Thanks for posting the great plant fossils! ;)

Hopefully one of our great members from BC will tell us the formation with genus/species list.

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Heliophyllum360

Neat finds. :)

Thanks for showing them to us.

Any ideas on what they are?

Regards,

I think the fern-like one appears to be Metasequoia.

Everything else seems barely identifiable to me.

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Heliophyllum360

What is their age? Paleogene? Neogene?

These fossils were from the Paleogene (Eocene epoch) and were part of a sequence of flood deposits (if I remembered clearly what my profs told me on the field school excursion).

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Ordovician_Odyssey

Welcome to the forum from ottawa ontario!

very cool plant material! BC sure does get a whole new set of fossils then here in ontario...

-shamus

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I think the fern-like one appears to be Metasequoia.

Even without seeing the list of flora where you found these I'm pretty confident calling these plants Cunninghamia sp. It's also a conifer although typically much rarer than the occurrence of Metasequoia, at least from the floras that I'm most familiar with. Here's one I have from the Lyons Flora.

Cunninghamia chaneyi

Oligocene, Oregon - 10cm

post-4301-0-91845500-1293678195_thumb.jpg

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Nice plant fossils heliophyllum.... BC has so much rich fossil deposits.... please keep on posting BC fossils.

PL

Edited by pleecan
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Seeing how the forum has a lot of Ontario fossils, I thought I would contribute by posting some plant fossils from British Columbia.

I found these fossils near the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory near the city of Penticton on my last field school excursion. I hope I could go back there again sometime in the future as these two fossils show that the outcrop I found them from look like a very promising spot for some really good stuff similar to these.

Hey Heliophyllum360,

nice specimens from the middle Eocene White Lake Formation. I've been to the site on several occasions and seen some spectacular stuff from the area. If you get back to the area contact me via PM and I'll show you some really good sites for plant fossils.

Dan

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Heliophyllum360

Even without seeing the list of flora where you found these I'm pretty confident calling these plants Cunninghamia sp. It's also a conifer although typically much rarer than the occurrence of Metasequoia, at least from the floras that I'm most familiar with. Here's one I have from the Lyons Flora.

Well, according to this article on the White Lake Basin where I found my plant fossils, I am very confident these are Metasequoia as its remains appear to dominate the site and Cunninghamia is completely absent there (see page 56 (8) of article).

The only place I found Cunninghamia sp. to likely occur within Canada was in Alberta in late Cretaceous rocks according to the online Paleobiology Database.

Nice specimen by the way.

Edited by Heliophyllum360
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Well, according to this article on the White Lake Basin where I found my plant fossils, I am very confident these are Metasequoia as its remains appear to dominate the site and Cunninghamia is completely absent there (see page 56 (8) of article).

The only place I found Cunninghamia sp. to likely occur within Canada was in Alberta in late Cretaceous rocks according to the online Paleobiology Database.

Nice specimen by the way.

Thanks Heliophyllum360 for the great article! ;)

Paleobiology Database is a good resource however it misses many taxa and species. They have a lot of catching up to do there. It's good in any event, just not a catch-all by any stretch. Metasequoia would be right if we're to infer that's a complete listing of the flora known there. The second specimen you posted (IMG3006) looks entirely different to me though, that's the one that got my attention.

Btw, here is a LINK for Cunninghamia sp. from the Eocene McAbee Formation. Maybe someone here at the forum with anecdotal collecting data for these formations can shed some light on their precise floras and stratigraphic relationships to each other?

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Well, according to this article on the White Lake Basin where I found my plant fossils, I am very confident these are Metasequoia as its remains appear to dominate the site and Cunninghamia is completely absent there (see page 56 (8) of article).

The only place I found Cunninghamia sp. to likely occur within Canada was in Alberta in late Cretaceous rocks according to the online Paleobiology Database.

Nice specimen by the way.

Thanks Heliophyllum360 for the great article! ;)

Paleobiology Database is a good resource however it misses many taxa and species. They have a lot of catching up to do there. It's good in any event, just not a catch-all by any stretch. Metasequoia would be right if we're to infer that's a complete listing of the flora known there. The second specimen you posted (IMG3006) looks entirely different to me though, that's the one that got my attention.

Btw, here is a LINK for Cunninghamia sp. from the Eocene McAbee Formation. Maybe someone here at the forum with anecdotal collecting data for these formations can shed some light on their precise floras and stratigraphic relationships to each other?

Someone has suggested that the congestion of multiple specimens on IMG3006 is wreaking havoc on my troubled eyes. :wacko:

In the absence of any other possibility it must be Metasequoia. I might have to invest in a stronger pair of reading glasses. :blink:

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OK,

so I'm going to throw my two cents in here now. After pondering the two specimens, for a bit, I can say with all certainty that the second plate (IMG_3006) is Metasequoia occidentalis, a very common occurrence in the White Lake Formation and nearby Allenby Formation. I came to this conclusion after considering the needle shape and attachment, both say Metasequoia.

The first plate (IMG_3002) is a bit more puzzling! At first it looks like Metasequoia, but the needle attachment looks funny. At times I think the needles are oppositely attached (= Metasequoia), while I can convince my self that the needles are alternately attached (= Sequoia) at the same time. I'm leaning towards Metasequoia but I wouldn't rule out Sequoia. I know that doesn't really help but that's what I'm seeing.

Dan

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Heliophyllum360

Wow, I didn't expect what apparently seemed obvious to me at first could cause a bit of flip-flopping over the identity of which plant species these came from! ^_^

Edited by Heliophyllum360
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I made my way over to White Lake (near Penticton, British Columbia) today to check out the state of the plant fossils exposed in the area. The area was much as I remember from my trips there several years ago, except that most of the exposure was covered with snow!

The fossil bearing rocks near white Lake are interbedded conglomerates, coarse to fine grained sandstones and thin siltstones. From my experience the best fossils occur at the boundary between the siltstones and sandstones. Unfortunately the siltstones are usually fragmentary and the sandstones can be massively bedded making collecting a nightmare. Carbonized wood and leaves are common within both the sandstones and the siltstones.

Here are some photos I took today of typical carbonized plant remains at the White Lake site.

post-2629-0-99378900-1294532385_thumb.jpgpost-2629-0-27608200-1294532390_thumb.jpgpost-2629-0-27225200-1294532394_thumb.jpg

Carbonized wood probably from Metasequoia occidentalis and some un-identified broad leaves.

Bits of Metasequoia were strewn about the exposure, and I also identified several bits of Sequoia and two Cercidiphyllum leaves. None of the specimens were worth collecting so I left them where they lay. I collected only one specimen today! An almost complete Metasequoia occidentalis cone!

post-2629-0-81470300-1294532381_thumb.jpg

Although there are some neat things to be seen at White Lake, much better material can be found around Princeton, British Columbia!!!!!

Edited by palaeopix
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Helliophyllum, thanks for the thread and pictures. Great material!

Dan, snow or snow it looked like some fun collecting them there plants at White lake. Thanks for going/showing!

Regards, Chris

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Although there are some neat things to be seen at White Lake, much better material can be found around Princeton, British Columbia!!!!!

So after making this rather flippant remark I returned to White Lake for a more serious look and was surprised with some very nice broad leaf fossils. I will be posting photos soon!

Dan

I've posted the photos in another topic titled White Lake Formation. Here is the link: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php/topic/17981-white-lake-formation/page__pid__198670#entry198670

Edited by palaeopix
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  • 4 years later...

Hello All

I see a few people on this thread know some decent sites in the Penticton area. My grandfather, who lived in Penticton, used to take me looking for fossils 35 years ago when I was a kid, and I'm returning there with my own kids and would love to go hunting for fossils with them. If anyone can point me to a couple of good spots, I'd be incredibly grateful.

With thanks....

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