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Succor Creek Fossil Flora


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#1 piranha

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 06:25 PM

These plants are from the Miocene of the Succor Creek Formation.
Succor Creek flora spans from eastern Oregon to Owyhee Co., Idaho.

RE: Ore Bin bulletin and catalog of the flora and woods of Succor Creek. LINK



Succor Creek Flora
Middle-Late Miocene
Malheur Co., Oregon

Succor_Creek1.jpg Succor_Creek3.jpg Succor_Creek2.jpg

Succor_Creek4.jpg Succor_Creek5.jpg Succor_Creek6.jpg

#2 Auspex

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 09:24 PM

Top row #1 (left to right) is simply put a sensational specimen...

I need to add an emphatic "Roger that!"; wonderful fossil! :wub:

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about."
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#3 piranha

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 12:40 AM

Top row #1 (left to right) is simply put a sensational specimen. You have a perfect leaf from an extinct water oak--Quercus simulata--residing on the same bedding surface with an oak acorn cup! Wonderful, indeed.

All of your specimens are in my opinion oaks, by the way, except for one: top row--all Quercus simulata; bottom row, image #1 bottom specimens--Quercus simulata; bottom row, middle specimen is a Mahonia (one common name for Mahonia is Oregon grape; also Oregon grapeholly). The remainder are certainly oak leaves, as well, probably from the oak Quercus pollardiana (used to be called Quercus hannibali), which is quite similar to the living maul oak Quercus chrysolepis (also called Canyon live oak) now native to the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada and the Coastal ranges of California, primarily. Q. simulata and Q. pollardiana are very common consitituents of Miocene floras in neighboring Nevada.

http://inyo1.110mb.c...iddlegate7.html
A complete leaf from the extinct water oak Quercus simulata I collected several years ago from the middle Miocene Middlegate Formation, Nevada.

I need to add an emphatic "Roger that!"; wonderful fossil! :wub:

Thanks Guys for the great compliments!

I have a photo atlas for the Succor Creek flora but sadly I haven't been able to secure its whereabouts. :blink:

An additional shout out is in order to Inyo for spot-on classification and superb command of the subject. :)

#4 Shellseeker

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 08:02 AM

Outstanding finds that make me want to travel. Thanks for sharing. I am constantly reminded in post after post the incredible knowledge and insight shared on a broad range of topics.
This forum is rather unique.

#5 Guest_N.AL.hunter_*

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 08:59 AM

Thanks for this post. That is a new site to me. Too bad Idaho is a little too far away for a weekend trip!

#6 Plantguy

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 09:55 PM

Hey Piranha, Yep, that first one is really spectacular and the others are quite nice. Looks like a neat site to collect. As it turns out I have one sample from that formation from Rockville, Oregon with 3 Oak leaves and an Ash Seed Fraxinus coulteri Dorf Label says the Oaks are Quercus hannbali Dorf that Inyo mentioned.

Succor Creek Fm Rockville Oregon 1.jpg
Succor Creek Fm Rockville Oregon 4.jpg

Hey Inyo, do you agree with those ID's?

Thanks for sharing the collection photos! Regards, Chris

#7 Wrangellian

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 05:16 AM

Nice ones indeed! I like that first one too, as well as that 'holly'/OR grape I think is the one..
(Where is Inyo's original post, I only see the reply to it.. did he delete it?)

#8 palaeopix

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 01:57 AM

These plants are from the Miocene of the Succor Creek Formation.
Succor Creek flora spans from eastern Oregon to Owyhee Co., Idaho.

RE: Ore Bin bulletin and catalog of the flora and woods of Succor Creek. LINK



Succor Creek Flora
Middle-Late Miocene
Malheur Co., Oregon

Succor_Creek1.jpg Succor_Creek3.jpg Succor_Creek2.jpg

Succor_Creek4.jpg Succor_Creek5.jpg Succor_Creek6.jpg


Scott,

those are really nice especially that first photo!

The lithology does look very similar to that of material found near Whipsaw Creek.

Very cool stuff out there!!!!!

Dan

#9 AeroMike

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 08:13 AM

That first one with the acorn is awesome, it is just stunning.

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