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pleecan

Development Of Extreme Macro Photography

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pleecan

For the benefit of others on this forum, for those who can understand the jargon... a bit of imaging technology to share with you.... for the past year I have been fine tuning various optical systems to achieve high definition capture of microfossils....

Finally my reverse adapter arrive in the mail today.... final piece to the jigsaw puzzle...

I have finally been able to image tiny things less than 10 microns with a limiting range to 5-7 microns.

Optic configuration: DSLR with 2 sets of bellows in series attached to a reverse adapter that allows backwards mounting of 55mm Super Takumar F1.8 lens.

post-2446-0-88976900-1294828004_thumb.jpg

This system works great!

Below is the uncropped image of a micro slide calibration each division represents 10 microns or 0.01mm

The system is clearly able to resolve 2 objects separated by 10 microns.

post-2446-0-08094500-1294803773_thumb.jpg

Here is an sample of Devonian Ostracodes from Arkona

post-2446-0-55981300-1294803855_thumb.jpg

The system generates a flat field of view and good chromatic aberration correction.

I am very please with this system.

PL

Edited by pleecan

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xonenine

amazingly clear image, I don't even know what else to say, wow!

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pleecan

amazingly clear image, I don't even know what else to say, wow!

Thanks.

PL

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Fred

A setup and result of great excellence. You, sir, are a wizard.

I love how you do the lighting using a desktop lamp. I recon you have to use a mirror lock-up function and a rather long exposure? The depth of field seems very usable.

I just have to get me some bellows after seeing this.

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xonenine

what type of bulb do you use for lighting?

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Fred

I used to work with halogen lamps in a very similar way but got me a flash gun recently. I like the idea of the desktop lamp because it's so simple. This demonstrates that good results do not necesserily require sophisticated materials. My first setup used a halogen lamp and a simple studio made out of a cardboard box. :D

329163997setup.jpg

When I use the flash gun I do not use the flash gun directly but rather let the light from the remotely positioned flash bounce off a white wall first. This gives soft lighting. The other side of the fossil can be lighted by using a sheet of paper as a reflector screen. The advantage is that the flash gun is powerful enough to allow me to hand-hold the camera, even when using a reversed objective for greater magnifications. This allows me to work faster.

What I find particularly impressive about your setup is the order of magnification you achieve combined with the quality. Mind-boggling and inspiring.

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barefootgirl

These are great! I love micro fossil photography. I like to mess around with my daughters little celstron digital microscope. It hooks straight into the computer and takes pictures. I have some wonderful picts of a coprolite full of little bones, vert and possibly a tooth. I just wish I could figure out how to get them from the clestron program over to here so I could share them with you all. <_<

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pleecan

A setup and result of great excellence. You, sir, are a wizard.

I love how you do the lighting using a desktop lamp. I recon you have to use a mirror lock-up function and a rather long exposure? The depth of field seems very usable.

I just have to get me some bellows after seeing this.

Thank you Fred. The desktop lamp is just an ordinary CFL spiral bulb cool white at 6000K.

Yes I use remote shutter release and mirror lock up function

I use F8 and beyond with exposures 2.5 seconds and higher to max 5 to 6 seconds... the Foveon is a bit tricky as it overloads some times and all you get is a blue picture.

Exposure was trial and error.

Peter

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pleecan

what type of bulb do you use for lighting?

Spiral CFL bulb cool white = 6000K..... cheap efficient lighting.

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pleecan

I used to work with halogen lamps in a very similar way but got me a flash gun recently. I like the idea of the desktop lamp because it's so simple. This demonstrates that good results do not necesserily require sophisticated materials. My first setup used a halogen lamp and a simple studio made out of a cardboard box. :D

329163997setup.jpg

When I use the flash gun I do not use the flash gun directly but rather let the light from the remotely positioned flash bounce off a white wall first. This gives soft lighting. The other side of the fossil can be lighted by using a sheet of paper as a reflector screen. The advantage is that the flash gun is powerful enough to allow me to hand-hold the camera, even when using a reversed objective for greater magnifications. This allows me to work faster.

What I find particularly impressive about your setup is the order of magnification you achieve combined with the quality. Mind-boggling and inspiring.

Thanks for showing your set up Fred! I think half the fun is think of ways to set up the optical equipment. I use low intensity lighting from only one direction to generate natural relief and enhance structure and I rotate the specimen 360 degrees and shoot from many angles to capture minute details. All my pictures are timed exposures of up to 6 seconds. I was so excited with the result that I wanted to share the results with people on this forum.... the lens and bellows are relatively cheap so you really don't need to spend a bunch of money to get excellent results.

This system is capable to resolve 5-7 microns= 0.005mm to 0.007mm... now that is tiny.

PL

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pleecan

These are great! I love micro fossil photography. I like to mess around with my daughters little celstron digital microscope. It hooks straight into the computer and takes pictures. I have some wonderful picts of a coprolite full of little bones, vert and possibly a tooth. I just wish I could figure out how to get them from the clestron program over to here so I could share them with you all. dry.gif

Lots of fun exploring and looking at tiny things!

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xonenine

Im happy to see a light-box, I thought I was just making do constructing my last one, and there it is, no fancier than that.:)

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Geodigger

Hi Peter,

Wow! That is wonderful work you are doing with the optics. You are now in the realm of chitinozoans and acritarchs. Apparently they are relatively common in the Arkona shales. When I find the link I will send you an interesting article on processing these microfossils. The Geological Survey of Canada published a bulletin on the chitinozoans from the Hungry Hollow area ... I will have to find that one for you too.

Cheers,

Bill

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pleecan

Hi Peter,

Wow! That is wonderful work you are doing with the optics. You are now in the realm of chitinozoans and acritarchs. Apparently they are relatively common in the Arkona shales. When I find the link I will send you an interesting article on processing these microfossils. The Geological Survey of Canada published a bulletin on the chitinozoans from the Hungry Hollow area ... I will have to find that one for you too.

Cheers,

Bill

Thanks Bill..... I think this optical system is at par with alot of professionally built systems for imaging.... chitinozoans and acritarchs, would be very interesting to explore....

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/GeolSci/micropal/acritarch.html

Peter

Edited by pleecan

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Geodigger

Thanks Bill..... I think this optical system is at par with alot of professionally built systems for imaging.... chitinozoans and acritarchs, would be very interesting to explore....

http://www.ucl.ac.uk.../acritarch.html

Peter

Hi Peter, Here is the pdf link on techniques for processing and photographing chitinozoans. Miller, 1967.

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pleecan

Hi Peter, Here is the pdf link on techniques for processing and photographing chitinozoans. Miller, 1967.

Thanks very much Bill! The paper talks about infrared imaging of dark bodies.... wow.... I did show pictures and configuration of the latest setup to the ROM... they liked it.

Peter

Edited by pleecan

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pleecan

Latest configurations Sony Nex-3 mirrorless interchangeable lens digital camera with Live view and Canon bellows / optics

IMGP2691.jpg

IMGP2681.jpg

IMGP2685.jpg

IMGP2687.jpg

IMGP2685.jpg

IMGP2679.jpg

Fun with optics....

PL

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piranha

Hi Peter,

Your photographic applications and ingenuity are always very impressive. I just realized the actual Sony camera body is just a fraction of this elaborate kit that you constructed. Are you pleased with your image results with this new setup? Can you show us any examples yet?

Congrats! :D

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Malcolmt

Peter, you are the "man" when it comes to fossil imaging.....

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pleecan

Hi Peter,

Your photographic applications and ingenuity are always very impressive. I just realized the actual Sony camera body is just a fraction of this elaborate kit that you constructed. Are you pleased with your image results with this new setup? Can you show us any examples yet?

Congrats! :D

Thanks Scott!

I am currently imaging a rare Silurian Bertie Lagerstatte of Acanthodii found by Carl Fechko of Ohio ... fossil to reside at the ROM and no pictures will be released till publication.

I am pleased with the results current mirrorless camera bodies tested include Sony Nex-3, Olympus EP-1, Panasonic G1, GF2.... with lens from Canon, Olympus, Minolta, Zeiss, and Takumar... There is less mechanical vibrations... I will post some pics of more common stuff shortly...

Edited by pleecan

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pleecan

Peter, you are the "man" when it comes to fossil imaging.....

Thanks Malcolm smile.gif

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pleecan

Here is an image produced from the above set up:

Imaged with Nex-3 + 2 sets of extension tubes with cone shaped internal baffle + Canon FL Bellows+ Canon FL 50mm F1.8 lens set to F16.

Label_modDSC00638.jpg

Edited by pleecan

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glacialerratic

Excellent pictures and a cool fossil, as always, Peter!

I am curious about the adjustable stand your subject rests on.

That looks very useful.

What's it called?

Thanks!

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pleecan

Excellent pictures and a cool fossil, as always, Peter!

I am curious about the adjustable stand your subject rests on.

That looks very useful.

What's it called?

Thanks!

The sample rest on a Lab Jack....

Below that is a precision inverted microscope stand without the optics for precise micro movements in the vertical axis.

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