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Sinopaleus

Partial Jaw

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Sinopaleus

Here's the first fossil I ever got. According to previous people it belonged to a type of rhinoceros. Is it really so?

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Sinopaleus

Here's the first fossil I ever got. According to previous people it belonged to a type of rhinoceros. Is it really so?

Ehh. Fossils found in similar matrix are all cenozoic. Could this one be cenozoic too?

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PrehistoricFlorida

It does look like some species of rhino to me.

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Sinopaleus

Ehh. Fossils found in similar matrix are all cenozoic. Could this one be cenozoic too?

mind telling me? :P

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jpc

It looks rhino-like. And definitely Cenozoic. Miocene, I'd even guess.

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Sinopaleus

It looks rhino-like. And definitely Cenozoic. Miocene, I'd even guess.

Ye. I've heard the rhino one quite a lot of times now.

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Sinopaleus

Is there anyone out there who could tell me what kind of rhino it is?

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Sinopaleus

identified by a paleontologist as a primitive giraffe :wacko: it got me too.

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Fruitbat

I almost hate to disagree with a 'professional' paleontologist but those are definitely NOT giraffid teeth...primitive or modern. Giraffes are artiodactyls with selenodont teeth as illustrated below:

Fig-399-Grinding-surface-of-the-molar-and-praemolar-teet.jpg

Fig.399. Grinding-surface of the molar and praemolar teeth of the Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) showing the selenodont type of dentition. From the Manual of Zoology

The teeth you pictured are definitely rhinocerotid. It will be almost impossible to venture a guess as to genus and species without having some more information...especially about where it was collected.

-Joe

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steelhead9

The teeth appear to be from the miocene hornless rhino CHILOTHERIUM.

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Sinopaleus

The teeth appear to be from the miocene hornless rhino CHILOTHERIUM.

interesting. but if im not wrong i'd say that chilotherium aint got that hook on the upper jaw?

and just to add to it if there's any other chinese people here you'd know wat i mean.

my dad told me he was sure the last character of the fossil jaw was 兽。 rhino like fossils all have 犀 in the end. for example, CHILOTHERIUM's chinese name is 大唇犀。兽 applies to many other mammalians, especially primitive giraffes.

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Sinopaleus

and also take a look at the teeth. chilotherium teeth are all small, compared to this (i have seen actual chilo teeth bak in gansu). and the teeth in this jaw have different shape and size.

post-4996-0-13018200-1301204803_thumb.jpg

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Sinopaleus

I almost hate to disagree with a 'professional' paleontologist but those are definitely NOT giraffid teeth...primitive or modern. Giraffes are artiodactyls with selenodont teeth as illustrated below:

Fig-399-Grinding-surface-of-the-molar-and-praemolar-teet.jpg

Fig.399. Grinding-surface of the molar and praemolar teeth of the Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) showing the selenodont type of dentition. From the Manual of Zoology

The teeth you pictured are definitely rhinocerotid. It will be almost impossible to venture a guess as to genus and species without having some more information...especially about where it was collected.

-Joe

giraffa cameloparadis... our science class animal mascot!!! :o

anyways, now that you mentioned it, it does seem a bit out of place... are there any giraffes with teeth the size of this?? ....... mm i hope not.... but never underestimate primitive beings! :P

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Fruitbat

There are dozens of different Oligocene, Miocene, Pliocene and Pleistocene rhinocerotids found in China (if that is, indeed, where the fossil is from). We cannot rule out other a few other types of perissodactyls either. fossil maniac...do you have ANY idea where this fossil was found? Any clues you can give us that will narrow down its age will go a long way to helping us give you more specific information about which perissodactyl you've got.

-Joe

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Sinopaleus

There are dozens of different Oligocene, Miocene, Pliocene and Pleistocene rhinocerotids found in China (if that is, indeed, where the fossil is from). We cannot rule out other a few other types of perissodactyls either. fossil maniac...do you have ANY idea where this fossil was found? Any clues you can give us that will narrow down its age will go a long way to helping us give you more specific information about which perissodactyl you've got.

-Joe

my dad got it for me in lanzhou, gansu province, northwestern china around 6 years ago... i think

the fossil is also from gansu province.

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