Jump to content
Coalmineedestus

Edestus Jaw

Recommended Posts

Coalmineedestus

I'm told this is from an edestus shark... whats something like this worth? I found it in a western ky coal mine and Ky Geological blah blah wants to display it on a yr or two loan. try to figure out if i should risk loaning it, any info would be helpful.

post-5106-0-39730200-1299392356_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bdevey

I'm told this is from an edestus shark... whats something like this worth? I found it in a western ky coal mine and Ky Geological blah blah wants to display it on a yr or two loan. try to figure out if i should risk loaning it, any info would be helpful.

I don't really don't know much about shark fossils, but that looks like something I would see in in a museum. I also don't know what Ky Geological blah blah is but I would be proud if a geological something or a another wanted to display my find.

Great find

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coco

Hi,

I think that rests of Edestus are rare. We do not often see this species on the forum, and I saw only a single piece (expensive ! in my life. I don't know either than is Ky Geological, but it would be careful to make an official loan paper if you if you lend it to them.

Coco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Northern Sharks

Yes, that is a section of an Edestus jaw. The shark had one row of teeth like this on the top and on the bottom jaws like a pair of scissors, and unlike anything around today. Value would be roughly anywhere from several hundred to maybe a bit over $1000 max. The single teeth are uncommon and jawbone sections like yours I would say are rare. If you do loan it out, be sure to get paperwork to avoid problems with getting it back

Edited by Northern Sharks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nandomas

Yes, that is a section of an Edestus jaw. The shark had one row of teeth like this on the top and on the bottom jaws like a pair of scissors, and unlike anything around today. Value would be roughly anywhere from several hundred to maybe a bit over $1000 max. The single teeth are uncommon and jawbone sections like yours I would say are rare. If you do loan it out, be sure to get paperwork to avoid problems with getting it back

yes it is a beautiful Edestus specimen, be careful because of some problems about pyrite that turns in marcasite could affect this kinf of teeth ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Foshunter

For sure you don't see this shark species every day so do the paper work to insure you can have it retured to you. It speakes for itself that a museum is interested in it, awsome find.--Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bear-dog

:) Speaking from experience,I also suggest carefully completing a loan form.[Not suggested] I would also take it to them if possible.This ensures it will 1 arrive there without being lost,2 get there in one piece.

If it were mine I would loan it to them.Beside the warm fuzzy feeling you get inside,you can take pride in knowing you loaned a fossil to an institution that can expand the knowledge of others,rather than having it in your collection to show a few. All this from expreience and from the heart. Just mt 2 cents worth. :D

For me finding fossils are to expand the knowledge of my-self as well as others.It's one thing to have them in my collection,to show them off to friends,etc.But it is far greater to have them some place where everyone can learn from them.This is why my humble collection case looks so bare,but I always walk around with my head held high with a grin on my face. B)

Edited by bear-dog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tracer

it would seem that the first and largest question is whether this specimen is something you personally want to own. if it is, then you put your ownership of it in jeopardy by allowing it out of your possession. if it is not, then you put whatever monetary value it has in jeopardy by allowing it out of your possession. there's a big difference. money can be replaced - the specimen cannot.

i would much prefer gifting things and perhaps a tax write-off, because loaning things too frequently becomes an issue and strains relationships. i did, however, once loan someone something just to get rid of him. worked like a charm. never saw him again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
squalicorax

that is truely a rare find and one of only a handful of associated material from this quite large shark

thanks for the photo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RCFossils

Congratulations on your Edestus jaw. It is a nice large example. I was fortunate to pick one up last year from another FF member.

As to the value, I would say somewhere between 500.00 and 1,000.00 would be realistic.

I would agree that it would be nice to loan the specimen out if they agree to place it on public display. Just make sure that you have everything in writing.

Here is a picture of my example from Sparta Illinois. There are pyrite suns naturally attached to the jaw.

post-1202-0-44840600-1299427292_thumb.jpg

post-1202-0-34161600-1299427355_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RCFossils

A few more pictures

post-1202-0-86831500-1299427506_thumb.jpg

post-1202-0-91987600-1299427540_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
piranha

Awesome museum quality fossil Rob !! That one has to be one of the best ever I imagine. Seeing that beauty makes me want to start collecting Paleozoic shark fossils. OK ... I'll start with a nice Edestus jaw and associated teeth and then follow with a robust example of a Helicoprion to get the new collection rolling ...

Btw, what is the measurement Rob? :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RickNC

Figured that woudl be worth much more than that. There are meg teeth that go for that and those are far more common.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lordpiney

i have a question. all the reading material ive found, all point to edestus being a sea going shark. yet all the fossil material ive seen is found in coal mines. so was edestus a sea going shark, or a fresh water shark?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Auspex

i have a question. all the reading material ive found, all point to edestus being a sea going shark. yet all the fossil material ive seen is found in coal mines. so was edestus a sea going shark, or a fresh water shark?

My understanding is that the paleoenvironment may have been estuarine, with the association recording marine transgression; Edestus remains are mostly found with coal because lots of coal is being mined.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
flyguy784

Spectacular specimen, congradulations. It exudes antiquity, the Pyrite makes it even more special. I second the question, how big is it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jpc

This is a critter I have never heard of until this week. Cool fossil.

I would recommend loaning it. Will they be putting it on display?... you can ask that your name be on the signage..."On loan from Jimmy Bob" Also, most museums (and blah blah doesn't imply museum, but...) have an official loan form on file. It should have a time period on it, usually two years. Loans like this to museum, or between museums, are generally "renewable after two years". This is a good thing to have on it...if they don't have it, you can ask them to put it on there. After all it is your fossil and they want to borrow it... the ball is in your court. This, in theory, makes it so that in two years, the museum will contact you again and either give it back or say "This thing is so popular, can we hold on to it for another two years?" Also if you put it on your calendar that in two years, you shuold contact them, it'll help keep things from getting confused. And of course, it is OKfor you to ask for it back after two years.

I work in a museum and this is one of the things I do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Darwin Ahoy

Figured that woudl be worth much more than that. There are meg teeth that go for that and those are far more common.

Megs are more expensive than many things that are more rare. One major reason why I can't bring myself to buy one :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RCFossils

Thanks for the compliments. It is one of the nicer examples that I have seen. The piece is really amazing and it is the first example that I have seen with Pyrite Suns.

The jaw itself is approximately 8" in length.

I have seen several of these in museum collections and have not noticed any issues with pyrite disease. I know that a few examples were collected over fifty years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jlfossils

This is outrageous! I know you're proud of this!

A few more pictures

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shellseeker

WoW :wub:

I learn new things and words frequently on TFF -- Thanks to both Edestus owners - I do not imagine I will be finding a single tooth in South Florida. If a complete single tooth in good shape came up for sale -- what would it cost?

Hard to find a nice single tooth for sale , but here is one that sold on ebay..

http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/fossil-shark-tooth-edestus-heinrichi-from

Edited by Shellseeker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bear-dog

it would seem that the first and largest question is whether this specimen is something you personally want to own. if it is, then you put your ownership of it in jeopardy by allowing it out of your possession. if it is not, then you put whatever monetary value it has in jeopardy by allowing it out of your possession. there's a big difference. money can be replaced - the specimen cannot.

i would much prefer gifting things and perhaps a tax write-off, because loaning things too frequently becomes an issue and strains relationships. i did, however, once loan someone something just to get rid of him. worked like a charm. never saw him again.

:) I have way too many on loan and haven't lost any to date.I might also give you a helpful hint provided by a curator I work with.At the end of the loan if they want to keep it longer,fill out another loan form with the new loan time as well to keep with you.This will avoid any confusion.To date all fossils loaned by me have been returned. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Megalodon_hunter

AMAZING!!

What depth did you find this at?

I am curious as to just exactly how deep these are being found.

Edited by Megalodon_hunter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bear-dog

i have a question. all the reading material ive found, all point to edestus being a sea going shark. yet all the fossil material ive seen is found in coal mines. so was edestus a sea going shark, or a fresh water shark?

:) They lived in really,really cold water so they lived near the coal mines so they could heat their homes. :rofl: Sorry! :blush:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Megalodon_hunter

I am starting to realize there is a-lot of speculation about Edestus.

They have found fossilized forest inside Coal Mines in Illinois.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18279510/ns/technology_and_science-science/

Perhaps these fossilized jaws came from a Hunting animal that drug them inshore..

Edited by Megalodon_hunter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×