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Coalmineedestus

Edestus Jaw

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MikeDOTB

I have wanted one of these since I first saw one at the Aurora Fossil Museum over two years ago. But, as well as most, knew nothing about them. So yes, that brings up a laundry list of questions, here goes:

-They are extrememly rare as far as I can tell, why are they only worth 500.00-1000.00?

-At what depth were these remains found in the coal mines?

-Are there any places where the same layers are exponsed on the surface?

-What other fossils can be found along with these shark jaws?

-And I hardly ever see pictures of them, just how many specimens do you think are floating around? If they cost so little, are there a lot of them? And if

so, are they really common once you hit the right layer?

Ok I guess that's enough for now!

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Coalmineedestus

The depth was about 850 ft deep, and as far as I know

In the mines 40+ yr history only two have been found both being in the past year and a half the other being about 6 inches with 6 teeth

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MikeDOTB

The depth was about 850 ft deep, and as far as I know

In the mines 40+ yr history only two have been found both being in the past year and a half the other being about 6 inches with 6 teeth

850 Feet!?!?!? There goes the chance of ever being able to surface collect one! So wow, there must not be that many around, how are they only worth up to $1000.00?

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Megalodon_hunter

850 Feet!?!?!? There goes the chance of ever being able to surface collect one! So wow, there must not be that many around, how are they only worth up to $1000.00?

I think they are worth alot more than that when in perfect condition.

There also has to be a demand for it.

This was found 850 feet underground. That is simply amazing.

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Coco

More than 10 years ago, I have seen in France a Edestus specimen (about 20 cm = 7" or 8") with several teeth, for sale at 15 000 francs = 2 286 euros = 3 266 US$ !

Coco

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RickNC

I was wondering the same thing about the value.

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RCFossils

i have seen a few dozen edestus jaws come up for sale over the years. Pricing will vary based on size and condition.

You can occasionally find isolated teeth starting under 100.00. A top quality jaw can go for over 5,000.00.

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Shellseeker

I think part of the problem is whether a market exists outside of museums. The tooth is so rare that no one can really have a "collection" of them.

Curiosity .. If a perfect single tooth went up on eBay, what would be a fair starting value and what might it fetch?

Looking at Megs, I would think an Edestus would start at $500

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Auspex

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LanceH

I would let the Kentucky blah blah display it and study it for a year or two but then I'd want it back. Unless it's like a new species I can't really see the need to let anyone else have it permanently. While this great specimen is huge and rare it's not anything new or unknown to science.

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Nandomas

I would let the Kentucky blah blah display it and study it for a year or two but then I'd want it back. Unless it's like a new species I can't really see the need to let anyone else have it permanently. While this great specimen is huge and rare it's not anything new or unknown to science.

How do not quote this.

In my opinion if the donation is spontaneous, it is ok... if the donation is claimed by the Ky Museum, it is very far from to be ok ;)

I use volunteering for a Museum in Germany. I did donate some nice specimens to them because they are really fossil amateurs oriented :) (and also because they are very kind).

I do this spontaneously, but if sometime in the future the things will change (read: the new paleontologists wave is for the most part against fossil collecting by amateurs) and they will pretend my donations, I will immediately stop and I will pretend my fossils back.

Cheers

Nando

Edited by Nandomas

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vertman

That is a very nice fossil. I have seen some examples of this collected from some of the black shales in various quarries in the midwest. In all of these cases we have donated the specimens to the local museums. Yours, though, is better than any I have personally seen, except for a specimen in the collections at the University of Kansas. I appreciate getting to see it.

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Cole

Very nice specimen. Looks like it made national news---->Link

Front page of Yahoo today. :D

Cole~

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VisionXray23

I own two edestus pieces. I have a fairly well preserved 8" jaw with 8 teeth, none of which are compleat. I bought that one on ebay for about $1,300. I also a perfectly preserved single tooth on a 3" jaw section. The only flaw is that the tooth was broken and repaired. That piece was $450.00.

I have wanted one of these since I first saw one at the Aurora Fossil Museum over two years ago. But, as well as most, knew nothing about them. So yes, that brings up a laundry list of questions, here goes:

-They are extrememly rare as far as I can tell, why are they only worth 500.00-1000.00?

-At what depth were these remains found in the coal mines?

-Are there any places where the same layers are exponsed on the surface?

-What other fossils can be found along with these shark jaws?

-And I hardly ever see pictures of them, just how many specimens do you think are floating around? If they cost so little, are there a lot of them? And if

so, are they really common once you hit the right layer?

Ok I guess that's enough for now!

WoW wub.gif

I learn new things and words frequently on TFF -- Thanks to both Edestus owners - I do not imagine I will be finding a single tooth in South Florida. If a complete single tooth in good shape came up for sale -- what would it cost?

Hard to find a nice single tooth for sale , but here is one that sold on ebay..

http://www.worthpoin...-heinrichi-from

Edited by VisionXray23

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monty84

AMAZING!!

What depth did you find this at?

I am curious as to just exactly how deep these are being found.

The ones i find in my mine are in the 6 seam of coal. were just a lil over 200ft underground

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cowsharks

The ones i find in my mine are in the 6 seam of coal. were just a lil over 200ft underground

Do you have pictures of the ones you have found? We'd love to see them if you do.

Daryl.

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missingdigits

That is a very nice fossil. I have seen some examples of this collected from some of the black shales in various quarries in the midwest. In all of these cases we have donated the specimens to the local museums. Yours, though, is better than any I have personally seen, except for a specimen in the collections at the University of Kansas. I appreciate getting to see it.

Not to hijack a post, but is the specimen at KU on display at the Museum of Natural History on campus? I will check it out tomorrow if so!

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siteseer

MikeDOTB.

In the late 80's to early 90's there were a lot of teeth and several jaw sections available. I saw a few 2-3 tooth jaw sections and a couple of 5-8 tooth jaw sections. They were coming out of mines around Sparta, Illinois. At the time "pyrite suns" were very popular so the miners were concentrating on bringing those out but.they were also finding these weird little teeth and other things.. A couple of dealers started offering them at shows. They were very cheap for a while. I bought two nice teeth for $8 each back then.

The mines closed in the late 90's which was around the time a lot of shark collectors started getting really interested in them. Prices skyrocketed because no new stuff was coming out. It's hard to put a value on them now because some people are offering specimens for big prices but not getting any takers. It's that situation you see on "Pawn Stars" or "American Pickers" - a guy can hold out for a high price and have to wait for a money bags collector to come along or he can be willing to take less to move what he has quickly (second option is worth considering if he can replenish his supply)..

I have seen Petalodus teeth, a large cladodont tooth, and a conodont specimen from the same formation - given as the Anna Shale, Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous). As I remember it, Listracanthus spines were somewhat common.

There are other layers that have yielded Edestus but I don't think I've ever seen one from outside a coal mine.

Jess

I have wanted one of these since I first saw one at the Aurora Fossil Museum over two years ago. But, as well as most, knew nothing about them. So yes, that brings up a laundry list of questions, here goes:

-They are extrememly rare as far as I can tell, why are they only worth 500.00-1000.00?
-At what depth were these remains found in the coal mines?
-Are there any places where the same layers are exponsed on the surface?
-What other fossils can be found along with these shark jaws?
-And I hardly ever see pictures of them, just how many specimens do you think are floating around? If they cost so little, are there a lot of them? And if
so, are they really common once you hit the right layer?

Ok I guess that's enough for now!

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Missourian

I have wanted one of these since I first saw one at the Aurora Fossil Museum over two years ago. But, as well as most, knew nothing about them. So yes, that brings up a laundry list of questions, here goes:

-Are there any places where the same layers are exponsed on the surface?

I've wondered about this myself. I've only heard of them being found in mines or cores -- but not at the surface. Perhaps they weather away before they have a chance to appear at the surface. Being found at the top of coal seams certainly can't help their chances.

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