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addicted2fossils

Fossils In South Georgia?

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addicted2fossils

I'm from south georgia, close to valdosta, and I was wondering if anyone knew what happened here for nothing to be fossilized? we're so close to florida it seems there would be fossils here too. If anyone has any info about this that would be great! (:

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Auspex

Fossilization requires a special set of circumstances, and even then it comes to naught for fossil hunters if that layer is not exposed.

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Uncle Siphuncle

Sherman burned them all??? J/K

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Fossildude19

Sherman burned them all??? J/K

Ouch! That was funny!

Thanks for the laugh, Dan.

Regards,

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PrehistoricFlorida

Much of South Georgia's soils are too acidic for fossil preservation.

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addicted2fossils

Much of South Georgia's soils are too acidic for fossil preservation.

I actuallyl remember reading that somewhere. So I guess thats it (: thankyou!

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addicted2fossils

Sherman burned them all??? J/K

ahaa very good one!

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Uncle Siphuncle

Sorry...couldn't resist a round of tomfoolery...

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Harry Pristis

You may not find fossils in South Georgia, in part, because of the Suwannee Seaway. This was a seaway connecting the Gulf of Mexico with the Atlantic Ocean roughly along the Suwannee River Valley through Northeast Florida and South Georgia.

"The Siliciclastic Invasion

By mid Cenozoic time (late Oligocene), the Suwannee Seaway and the Gulf Trough, two consecutive open seaways connecting the northern Gulf of Mexico to the Atlantic across northern Florida and Georgia, had been infilled (Chen, 1965; McKinney, 1984; Popenoe et al., 1987). This infilling probably occurred during sea-level lowstands when rivers draining off the southern Appalachian Mountains built deltas, which extended south and onlapped carbonates of the northern Florida Platform. This was the initial phase of Florida's siliciclastic "invasion," which continues today as quartz sand moves south along the beaches bordering peninsular Florida. The siliciclastic invasion is an important event in Florida's geologic history, because this process provided the State with the materials to create the high-quality beaches people enjoy today."

What this means is deep sand (siliclastics) covering much of the area. No sink-hole traps and no incised streams to act as repositories for land vertebrate fossils. It means that the soil has good drainage with few anaerobic situations for the preservation of organic remains. Just my theory.

Edited by Harry Pristis

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jpc

South Georgia... the sub-Antarctic Island full of nesting albatrosses? I think it is volcanic, so no fossils. Or maybe it is an extension of the Antarctic Pennisula, so there might actually fossils on South Georgia. Or the southern portion of the ex-Soviet republic? I know nothing about it geologically/paleontologically. Or southern Georgia here in the USA? Sounds like others have answered that possibility. ;)

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addicted2fossils

yeah it was about south georgia in the US. And everyone has given me great answers. Thank you guys!

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Jesta384

South Georgia... the sub-Antarctic Island full of nesting albatrosses? I think it is volcanic, so no fossils. Or maybe it is an extension of the Antarctic Pennisula, so there might actually fossils on South Georgia. Or the southern portion of the ex-Soviet republic? I know nothing about it geologically/paleontologically. Or southern Georgia here in the USA? Sounds like others have answered that possibility. ;)

yeah it was about south georgia in the US. And everyone has given me great answers. Thank you guys!

He was just messing with you. :rolleyes:

I liked the Sherman joke. That made me chuckle.

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Shellseeker

It is curious how the pathway from finding shark teeth in a river leads me to be intensely interested in pollen grains from the Eocene.

Drilling for land 2500 feet down

Last Thursday was our monthly meeting of the Lee County Fossil club. One of our members, Curt Klug gave a video-slide show presentation of finding "land" in what is presently Pine Island, Florida 40-50 myas. They positively identified the land as land from pollen grains of trees and flowers, mixed in with the types of micro organisms that cause red tide today. So, a land based Florida environment 10-15 myas before it was supposed to exist. During the Eocene, there were minimal ice caps at the poles, meaning most/all of Florida was well under water. The strange thing for myself ( who did poorly in sciences in school) could be intensely interested in pollen grains of Walnut trees 45 myas. Who knew? ;)

I was out in the Peace yesterday and found some perfect Makos and Sand Tigers. I am constantly amazed and thankful for the natural miracles that bring these gifts to me so close to where I live.

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mattw

I know this is an old post but i do beg to differ about the fossils occuring regularly down here. You will normally only find them around the rivers where you find alot of limestone bluffs. I live not far from you (Tifton) and I travel alot to the flint river (anywhere between cordele and bainbridge) and I know alot of divers who collect also. I have seen collections of numberous mammoth teeth and bones, sharks teeth (including the awesome megaladon) and all sorts of other fossilized teeth that i have no idea what they are haha. Last week i found my first 2 fossilized river shark teeth and some kind of vertebra or something and what may be a piece of a mastadon leg bone [i have high hopes anyways : ) ]. But the river is down very low and clear right now and a very good time to go. A good idea would try to find a land owner on the stretch of river between warwick and albany to let you hunt their part of the river for legal reasons. that part of the river is considered non-navigable therefore means that the land owner actually owns halfway out into the river and can legally collect from that area. Hope ya get a chance to look and find something. God bless.

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Coralhead

Around Girard is fossilized bryozoans at Stoney Bluff.

12846956545_ff16357dc3_z.jpg

Montezuma at the Flint River

8234962324_cf251a94af_z.jpg

9027242117_ce04e04e70_z.jpg

Coral from the Withlacoochee River

8474322485_68aef1d0f4_z.jpg

The Flint River is a smorgasbord.

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Kristofer

Dr. Robert L. Little from Valdosta State College discovery of the fossilized giant sea turtle head northeast of Valdosta in the 1970s. Here is a picture of Dr. Robert L. Little holding the fossilized giant sea turtle head...post-20514-0-43276800-1453255875_thumb.jpeg

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goatinformationist

I'm from south georgia, close to valdosta, and I was wondering if anyone knew what happened here for nothing to be fossilized? we're so close to florida it seems there would be fossils here too. If anyone has any info about this that would be great! (:

Oh dude! Get thee hence to any of the southeast GA rivers and take your mask. The closer you get to the Suwannee valley the easier it is to find nice agatized corals, shark teeth and large (underwater) bone piles. Start with the Withlacoochee, sweet.

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MeargleSchmeargl
On 4/14/2011 at 5:33 PM, addicted2fossils said:

I'm from south georgia, close to valdosta, and I was wondering if anyone knew what happened here for nothing to be fossilized? we're so close to florida it seems there would be fossils here too. If anyone has any info about this that would be great! (:

There are some places in South GA where you can find fossils, particularly speaking, At shark tooth beach on Jekyll island. There is a good number of Miocene shark teeth and ray dental plates to be found there. For south GA, most of your finds will be on the coast from what I can recollect.

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goatinformationist
On ‎3‎/‎6‎/‎2014 at 8:41 PM, Coralhead said:

Around Girard is fossilized bryozoans at Stoney Bluff.

12846956545_ff16357dc3_z.jpg

Montezuma at the Flint River

8234962324_cf251a94af_z.jpg

9027242117_ce04e04e70_z.jpg

Coral from the Withlacoochee River

8474322485_68aef1d0f4_z.jpg

The Flint River is a smorgasbord.

Oh yes, this is the best answer yet.  GP

 

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