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palaeopix

The McAbee Fossil Beds.

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jbswake

Dan,

I'm sorry to hear of the passing of Dave. I never had a chance to collect there but I have some fossils in my collection that I've gathered over the years.

Alder with Metasequoia

post-1408-0-49861000-1302958830_thumb.jpg

Alder cone

post-1408-0-41855100-1302958838_thumb.jpg

Catkins from an unknown tree

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Eohidion rosei

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Ginko dissecta

post-1408-0-85473700-1302958900_thumb.jpg

Unknown leaf

post-1408-0-54498200-1302958912_thumb.jpg

Frond from a White Cedar

post-1408-0-92320800-1302959089_thumb.jpg

Your ctakin is from the birch (betula) and your unknown leaf is a sassafras. I can't tell what is on the upper left side though. If it looks like scales up close then it is a partial cone, if up close it has fine veination then it's probably a flower (Dillhoffia cachensis).

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Shamalama

Thanks, JBS! I'll see if I can get a clearer picture of the blob on the sassafrass leaf.

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jbswake

Finally got the web site updated:

www.dll-fossils.com/

I know it is the McAbee website, but it's my project and am proud of what I've got done.

For those of you who want to know, Dave's wife is Linda. The address is his and wife's initial followed by their last name's initial. It used to be McAbee foosils, but Dave forgot to pay the bill one month and he got a very nice email asking him if he wanted to buy the domain bame back for only $10,000 US!

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Wrangellian

Wow, is that an example of "finders keepers, losers weepers"? Doesnt give me much hope for the human race, or the 'system'. Not sure which... Thanks for providing the link. I'll add to that the Paleocollaborator site for anyone who's interested in the McAbee fossils, though it doesn't seem to be updated regularly or responsive to submissions: http://www.evolvingearth.org/paleocollaborator/index.php

Anyway, here's a few of my specimens.. I just scanned them - not the best photo method I realize but it's what I have the time and money for!

post-4372-0-98570600-1303119141_thumb.jpg

Sassafras

post-4372-0-09833400-1303119197_thumb.jpg

Plecia sp.

post-4372-0-15793100-1303119240_thumb.jpg

Insect eggs?

Edited by Wrangellian

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Wrangellian

By the way, can anyone tell me the name of that leaf the insect eggs are on?

post-4372-0-46702100-1303119372_thumb.jpg

Is this one Chamaecyparis sp? (conifer).. with Metasequoia. I like these multispecies assemblages.

post-4372-0-34977600-1303119466_thumb.jpg

Catkin

Anecdote: The first time I went up there, the first insect I found was a kind of beetle with a long carapace. Between finding it and packing up I managed to lose it, and I desperately tried to find it again before we left but to no avail. I still kick myself over that absentmindedness. But I have not seen any similar beetles from that site since.. I wonder if anyone has found any since then? (maybe that very same specimen?? I hope so)

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jbswake

The insect eggs are on an elm (Ulmus okanaganensis) and that is chamaecyparis. When they are not really clear it is difficult to tell the chama from the thuja or thujopsis. But I always look for the dot on the thuja scales and they have a really cute shape when you find individual scales. My tell tale id for the ulmus is how the veins come off the centre and then what kind of point they come to on the outside edge. The elm have this sort of rounded point. Cratageus and the others have a more triangular point. And beech have gentle dips leading from one vein edge to the next.

There have been lots of beetles found. When I get the chance I will post some of the cute ones. The largest one I found was 3cm, but not complete. Dave has found a stag beetle that was complete. I have posted that picture somewhere on here. I also put a picture of a beetle under the photograph section in microscope trials. This is another project I have.

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Guest N.AL.hunter

Just looked at this thread for the first time.... I had read about this site and about the government wanting it. I am sorry to hear about the owners passing, and I hope it will remain in the private hands of the family. The insect and plant specimens are really out-of-this-world!! My only wish is that is wasn't so far away!! Thanks

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Wrangellian

Thanks jbs.. too many things to remember in ID'ing! I have so much trouble with photographing - nothing looks as good as it does to the naked eye.. I'd like to get ahold of a camera lucida setup with a binoc. microscope so I can make detailed drawings of leaves and such. One of these days.. after I win the lottery maybe.

N.AL Hunter: I dont know about that, Last I heard, the gov't DIDN'T really want the site.. it's a number of individuals and the Paleo organizations that have been trying for years to convince the gov't to protect the site from exploitation, but havent managed to convince them that it's worth doing. I'm on the fence about that, myself - on the one hand I recognize the importance of such sites to science and the need to protect from exploitation, but on the other hand everybody benefits from responsible amateur collecting, and places (like Burgess Shale) can become 'overprotected' and the more common fossils that arent needed by science/museums/etc are left there to eventually weather away instead of taking up proud places in people's collections, schools etc. Seems to me Dave's outfit is striking a reasonable balance between the two demands.

Edited by Wrangellian

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palaeopix

Cool specimens Eric!

That Plecia is very nice and is in an orientation (side view) you don't see very often!

Thanks for sharing your photos!

Dan

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palaeopix

The insect eggs are on an elm (Ulmus okanaganensis) and that is chamaecyparis. When they are not really clear it is difficult to tell the chama from the thuja or thujopsis. But I always look for the dot on the thuja scales and they have a really cute shape when you find individual scales. My tell tale id for the ulmus is how the veins come off the centre and then what kind of point they come to on the outside edge. The elm have this sort of rounded point. Cratageus and the others have a more triangular point. And beech have gentle dips leading from one vein edge to the next.

There have been lots of beetles found. When I get the chance I will post some of the cute ones. The largest one I found was 3cm, but not complete. Dave has found a stag beetle that was complete. I have posted that picture somewhere on here. I also put a picture of a beetle under the photograph section in microscope trials. This is another project I have.

Very cool beetle, John!

Can't wait to see what other goodies you have.

You should post that beetle from the Microscope thread here too!!!!!

Oh and thanks for clarifying the Chamaecyparis ID!

Dan

Edited by palaeopix

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jbswake

And now for a little more exotic! How about a few spiders. These I found in the summer of 2007. Needless to say they are will be in the TRU collection. At present they are at SFU with Bruce Archibald. Once they have been studied, they will return to Kamloops.

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palaeopix

And now for a little more exotic! How about a few spiders. These I found in the summer of 2007. Needless to say they are will be in the TRU collection. At present they are at SFU with Bruce Archibald. Once they have been studied, they will return to Kamloops.

Wow,

very nice especially the second one with the colour patterns on the legs!

Dan

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jbswake

But I digress. Back to the beetles. Here are some from 2006. Each is unique in its own sweet way. 153 has great texture to be almost 3d. 155 has some great lines as it's almost translucent. 158 has great antenna and if you look closely at the tail, the tip of its wings are still showing. 160 has great texture.

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palaeopix

But I digress. Back to the beetles. Here are some from 2006. Each is unique in its own sweet way. 153 has great texture to be almost 3d. 155 has some great lines as it's almost translucent. 158 has great antenna and if you look closely at the tail, the tip of its wings are still showing. 160 has great texture.

Great Stuff John!

Keep them coming!!

Number 155 is exceptional!!!

Dan

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jbswake

Another two from my 2006 collection.

216 217 is one of my favourites. It's an ant but has no wings! It's only about a cm across but if it was fully extended would be about 1.2cm.

250 is one of my many multi insect plates. There is a plecia on the left and a delicate tipula on the bottom right.

You can tell my cataloguing system: MB for McAbee, I for insects (plants have a P here, birds have a V, and fish have an F here), 06 for the year, and the last 3 numbers are for the specimen number.

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Auspex

NOTE: The three most recent posts to this topic have been moved to a more closely related discussion: My link

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piranha

NOTE: The three most recent posts to this topic have been moved to a more closely related discussion: My link

Thanks Chas!

Here is my only McAbee insect. I have been told it is a cicada.

Can anyone here say with confidence the genus and species?

post-4301-0-89499000-1303230547_thumb.jpg

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jbswake

Thanks Chas!

Here is my only McAbee insect. I have been told it is a cicada.

Can anyone here say with confidence the genus and species?

post-4301-0-89499000-1303230547_thumb.jpg

The cicada is actually a plant or leaf hopper. If you look at the larger wings (the cover wings) you can not see the vein detail that would be there if it were a cicada. The Cicadas external wings have a similar veination as the underside wings. Leaf hoppers tend to have less veination showing and can typically look like one unveined mass. And to answer the other question: none of the hoppers or cicadas (same family) have been studied in close detail to name any genus/species level papers. That is why we hold onto the insects at present. The scientists studying the insects is focused on the extraordinary special don't find too many of them large unique ones! Neither the hoppers, march flies, or ichneumons have really been studied yet.

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jbswake

163 is a cicada and next to it is ahopper. I collected both of these in 2004, the first summer of working with Dave at McAbee.With Dave giving me so much access and trust, that was the year my hobby became an all consuming passion and I felt I had to do something in return. That's when I told him I would try to address the scientists' concerns. He just looked at me and said, "Groovy."

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palaeopix

NOTE: The three most recent posts to this topic have been moved to a more closely related discussion: My link

Thanks Chas,

I appreciate you moving those posts to a more appropriate venue. Originally, I meant to leave a note asking that this thread be more of a showcase and less of a sounding board! I encourage those interested to visit the other threads as some valid points are raised!

Dan

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palaeopix

Here is my only McAbee insect. I have been told it is a cicada.

Can anyone here say with confidence the genus and species?

post-4301-0-89499000-1303230547_thumb.jpg

I don't know that the Eocene Plant Hoppers (like most insects) from McAbee (and Princeton) have really been studied all that well. The lowest level (or highest depending on how you rank your groups) of the taxonomic hierarchy that the Plant Hoppers can be confidently identified is family (Cercopidae).

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Arthropoda

Class: Insecta

Order: Hemiptera

Suborder: Auchenorrhyncha

Superfamily: Cercopoidea

Family: Cercopidae

Leach, 1815

Anyway, that's a pretty cool specimen Scott!

Dan

Edited by palaeopix

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Wrangellian

Wow, a lot happens in a day on a thread like this.. The beetle I found and lost back in 1992 looked closest to your #155, John, except I dont think it had that much detail, it may have been somewhat weathered. I do seem to recall it having antennae, though. Oh well, will never know now.

Thanks for posting the hopper, I think I have one of those. I'll post it if I ever get around to photo/scanning it.

Now I feel bad about making that comment about collectors vs professionals, now that the comment is orphaned by the removal of all related posts to another discussion! But that was a good idea.. I didnt intend though I should have known it would derail the Mcabee/Dave tribute.

Eric

Edited by Wrangellian

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jbswake

Dave staked the site in 1991. Prior to this, 3 papers were written about the site: a study of the strata and its relative age, a Wilson mention on the fish and insects he collected there, and a Master's thesis done by a student of Wilson's. The next paper did not show up until 1996. That is when the new species began to be published. Still no one was really collecting there. Dave encouraged interest by donating lots of specimens. Many of the specimens on the evolvingearth.org site are credited to Dave. In 2004 Dillhoff and Manchester rewarded Dave by naming the Fagus langevini after him. And that was the year the papers started coming out with more regularity. The latest paper names a new genus of crayfish. Dave's find is the holotype. He also handed in the specimen that became the Ulmus okanaganensis. Dave's responsibility to the science is what has opened the door for these attacks. All he ever wanted to do is share his love of fossils with young and old, novice and expert. He was an inspiration to many. The attacks on Mcabee are being driven by one scientist who has previously stated that he wants the site for himself. Dave was too gentle to publically fight back. He smiled and carried on regardless.

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jbswake

I thought I would post some pictures of Dave's personal collection.

This is the type specimen of crayfish.

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jbswake

This is an Ash that Dave found.

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