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chele

Camera And A Magnifiying Glass!

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chele

I have a pentax camera and it takes very nice pictures. It has a macro and super macro but I could never get a good close up picture. Yesterday I was looking at some small objects with my magnifiying glass and it dawned on me, why not use the camera and magnifiying glass. I tried various ways and it works. The first pic below is a druzy agate pic I had I had posted on the forum. The second is the same agate with the use of the magnifiying glass. The third is when the light is wrong. I have included a pic of the magnifiying glass also. It is not a very big one but is powerful. I would like to hear if anyone else has had success using this set up.

post-5476-0-05809800-1304096108_thumb.jpg

post-5476-0-44020000-1304096222_thumb.jpg

post-5476-0-63133800-1304096347_thumb.jpg

post-5476-0-38346400-1304096704_thumb.jpg

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pleecan

Lots of fun experimenting with optics!

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JohnJ

You may want to experiment with some suggestions in this topic. :)

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Auspex

How do you take a closeup of the magnifying glass? :P

Good results! I use a loupe for that occasionally.

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chele

You may want to experiment with some suggestions in this topic. :)

I am not camera friendly, buying a complicated camera is out of the question. My pentax is also a point and shoot. I like simplicity besides, the money I save by not buying the camera is more money I can spend on my hobby!

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chele

How do you take a closeup of the magnifying glass? :P

Good results! I use a loupe for that occasionally.

I used another magnifying glass!! :pic:

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Fossildude19

Great results, Chele! :)

I will have to give this a go with my Olympus Point and Shoot.

It has a super macro as well, but, I will try with a Magnifyer or loupe and see what the results are.

Thanks for the inspiration. :D

Regards,

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JohnJ

I am not camera friendly, buying a complicated camera is out of the question. My pentax is also a point and shoot. I like simplicity besides, the money I save by not buying the camera is more money I can spend on my hobby!

Chele, I was referring to 'point and shoot' applications in Posts #2 & #8. :D

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chele

Chele, I was referring to 'point and shoot' applications in Posts #2 & #8. :D

sorry, I read all the posts on your topic, and when some of the members started talking lenses, bodies and other accessories I got lost. :wacko: lenses, bodies and other accessories I got lost.

post-5476-0-03432200-1304112390_thumb.jpg

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JohnJ

sorry, I read all the posts on your topic, and when some of the members started talking lenses, bodies and other accessories I got lost. :wacko: lenses, bodies and other accessories I got lost.

:D I feel the same way sometimes. Have fun with the loupe technique when you can.

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Ameenah

I've been doing this for sometime now . Fake it until you make it.

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Indy

The first thing that crossed my mind when reading your post

and looking at the images that you posted using the magnifying

glass was...Considering you said the camera takes very good images

and has macro and super macro settings...Your camera should be able

to take shots like you posted without the use of a magnifying glass.

The above is what went through my mind and of course I'm not holding

your camera and experimenting.

IF and and repeat IF your camera can capture images equal or better

than the images posted...but you haven't had success then consider this

The closer the lens of a camera to the object the more light is required.

Also...Many (incorrectly) assume the camera lens must be VERY close to

the object in order to capture detail.

In your case...You have a camera with macro settings and if I were at

your home with your camera in hand...I would first go outside taking

advantage of natural full sunlight...and take a series of pictures

1st picture (in my opinion) with the lens too close to the specimen

2nd picture taken moving back an inch

3rd picture moving back an inch

And I would continue clicking...moving back an inch before each shot

until I had taken 8 or more pictures

Then I would upload the images to the computer and crop and or re-size

as needed (re-sizing increases focus qualities) then examine each for

the qualities I am hoping to find

All of the above only mentioned because you might find your excellent

camera with macro settings is not an issue...The light and distance

experiment might reveal some interesting images this camera is capable

of capturing

:zzzzscratchchin:

.

Edited by Indy

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surfergirlatx

The first thing that crossed my mind when reading your post

and looking at the images that you posted using the magnifying

glass was...Considering you said the camera takes very good images

and has macro and super macro settings...Your camera should be able

to take shots like you posted without the use of a magnifying glass.

The above is what went through my mind and of course I'm not holding

your camera and experimenting.

IF and and repeat IF your camera can capture images equal or better

than the images posted...but you haven't had success then consider this

The closer the lens of a camera to the object the more light is required.

Also...Many (incorrectly) assume the camera lens must be VERY close to

the object in order to capture detail.

In your case...You have a camera with macro settings and if I were at

your home with your camera in hand...I would first go outside taking

advantage of natural full sunlight...and take a series of pictures

1st picture (in my opinion) with the lens too close to the specimen

2nd picture taken moving back an inch

3rd picture moving back an inch

And I would continue clicking...moving back an inch before each shot

until I had taken 8 or more pictures

Then I would upload the images to the computer and crop and or re-size

as needed (re-sizing increases focus qualities) then examine each for

the qualities I am hoping to find

All of the above only mentioned because you might find your excellent

camera with macro settings is not an issue...The light and distance

experiment might reveal some interesting images this camera is capable

of capturing

:zzzzscratchchin:

.

Great comment Indy....I agree! I take approx 100 -200 pics of all my finds for my daily hunts...then I edit the pics to enhance details. I personally feel that the closer the camera is to the object, the more blurry and less details it has...I agree to hold the camera back a bit and use natural light and then crop the edges if the image off to inhance the original image....this seems to show the best detail....Just some additional food for thought :) - Granted my pics are not always the best quality...but its a game of trial and error to learn how to best focus your shots to get the most out of them :)

Happy Hunting and photography!

Kim

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surfergirlatx

I have a pentax camera and it takes very nice pictures. It has a macro and super macro but I could never get a good close up picture. Yesterday I was looking at some small objects with my magnifiying glass and it dawned on me, why not use the camera and magnifiying glass. I tried various ways and it works. The first pic below is a druzy agate pic I had I had posted on the forum. The second is the same agate with the use of the magnifiying glass. The third is when the light is wrong. I have included a pic of the magnifiying glass also. It is not a very big one but is powerful. I would like to hear if anyone else has had success using this set up.

Are these calicte formations?

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Indy

Another comment about imaging

Many incorrectly assume that I take 1 picture and then I post it

here or on one of my websites.

I NEVER take only 1 picture. I ALWAYS take several with the same view

of the fossil at various distances. Then I pick the best and toss the rest ;)

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Auspex

I NEVER take only 1 picture. I ALWAYS take several with the same view

of the fossil at various distances. Then I pick the best and toss the rest ;)

Much less expensive than in the film-age. ;)

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Indy

One last comment on macro phtotography

Previously mentioned "distance and light" but would like

to point out in this separate reply..."Light"

Light is not just the kind of light that many might think.

It is the "intensity" of the light. One can see the fossil

clearly on the table when taking a picture...HOWEVER the

camera needs MORE light to capture macro images than your eye.

Additional light will also increase focus of the captured image ;)

Demonstration: hold your hand palm facing you at a distance of

2 feet and slowly bring the palm of your hand closer to your eyes.

You will notice that the image gets darker and when real close

the image of your palm becomes very dark and out of focus. If you

repeat the process with external light beam focused on your palm

and bring your head closer...you will see a big difference.

Distance yes...but LIGHT plays a critical role when attempting

macro photography :)

Above only mentioned in the spirit of sharing and not meant to be

critical and maybe using some of the posted techniques you will

find a magnifying glass may not be necessary :D

Would be interested in hearing from you regard the above suggestions

:zzzzscratchchin:

Barry

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chele

One last comment on macro phtotography

Previously mentioned "distance and light" but would like

to point out in this separate reply..."Light"

Light is not just the kind of light that many might think.

It is the "intensity" of the light. One can see the fossil

clearly on the table when taking a picture...HOWEVER the

camera needs MORE light to capture macro images than your eye.

Additional light will also increase focus of the captured image ;)

Demonstration: hold your hand palm facing you at a distance of

2 feet and slowly bring the palm of your hand closer to your eyes.

You will notice that the image gets darker and when real close

the image of your palm becomes very dark and out of focus. If you

repeat the process with external light beam focused on your palm

and bring your head closer...you will see a big difference.

Distance yes...but LIGHT plays a critical role when attempting

macro photography :)

Above only mentioned in the spirit of sharing and not meant to be

critical and maybe using some of the posted techniques you will

find a magnifying glass may not be necessary :D

Would be interested in hearing from you regard the above suggestions

:zzzzscratchchin:

Barry

Hello Barry, I have tried many different ways to photograph fossils. I have tried many different light sources. The best that I have found is the sun. My photos are bright and the fossils clearly seen now. I still use the magnifying for the very tiny stuff(items that can barely seen with the naked eye). I have had very good results with it, but only with very good light. For instance the gastropod below is about the size of a pin head. I used the magnifying glass on that one. I could not use the sunlight for that one because this year has been very cloudy. I know light is a very big factor but even in bright sunlight my super macro could not get the detail like that with a magnifying glass. So if I do not have good light I use the glass. When the light is good I get very detailed and beautiful photos.

post-5476-0-45021200-1317176464_thumb.jpg

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Indy

Hello Barry, I have tried many different ways to photograph fossils. I have tried many different light sources. The best that I have found is the sun. My photos are bright and the fossils clearly seen now. I still use the magnifying for the very tiny stuff(items that can barely seen with the naked eye). I have had very good results with it, but only with very good light. For instance the gastropod below is about the size of a pin head. I used the magnifying glass on that one. I could not use the sunlight for that one because this year has been very cloudy. I know light is a very big factor but even in bright sunlight my super macro could not get the detail like that with a magnifying glass. So if I do not have good light I use the glass. When the light is good I get very detailed and beautiful photos.

Thanks for following up with detailed info regarding your

experiences and techniques...After reading your description

of the size of the fossil and seeing the image...I totally

understand. :)

I have never experimented with a magnifying glass for such

tiny fossils. Instead I have used a camera mounted on a microscope

KUDOS on your experiments using the magnifying lens and I think

I will experiment also...Anything to get the best image possible.

All techniques have their advantages. The more options the better.

Thank you so much for replying...Pardon my basic 1,2,3 suggestions ;)

When I first became interested in fossils I said to myself...

Well, here is a focus that would be interesting to persue and it

won't cost me a lot of money :laughing on the floor 24:

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chele

Much less expensive than in the film-age. ;)

Funny that you bring that up, I just found a couple of rolls of film that needs to be devoleped the other day. They must be at least 10 years old!

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central texas

I have a pentax camera and it takes very nice pictures. It has a macro and super macro but I could never get a good close up picture. Yesterday I was looking at some small objects with my magnifiying glass and it dawned on me, why not use the camera and magnifiying glass. I tried various ways and it works. The first pic below is a druzy agate pic I had I had posted on the forum. The second is the same agate with the use of the magnifiying glass. The third is when the light is wrong. I have included a pic of the magnifiying glass also. It is not a very big one but is powerful. I would like to hear if anyone else has had success using this set up.

Thank you for the idea. It may help me with my fuzzy pictures. :)

Bob

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bdevey

I enjoy using my loup with my point and shoot, works great! Here is one of my first photos, trying it....

Btw, thats a very little ant on a strawberrypost-4158-0-34302700-1317270748_thumb.jpg

These are 0.5 mm wide, click to enlarge to seepost-4158-0-87105400-1317270855_thumb.jpg

Edited by bdevey

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Indy

Camera And A Magnifiying Glass

Very interesting technique (never tried it before)

Appears that 1 (obvious) advantage is the lens of

the camera doesn't have to be as close to the object

which helps with focus and in doing so allows for

the use of more focused external lighting

This is a great technique members can use to capture

images of small fossils or small detail on larger fossils

using the cameras they now have. Many would like to

image small fossils or small areas on larger fossils

but are not interested in spending a ton of money or

interested in making photography their hobby.

Looking forward to seeing more images using this

fascinating and inexpensive technique :)

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