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Help To Identify Jaw Bone


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#1 North Guy

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 02:34 PM

Hello. My daughter and I just returned home from our trip to the Holmdel area for some shark tooth hunting and we need your help. We found this jaw bone(s) and have no idea what it is from. It looks like there are tusks, which have broken off, at the the front of the jaw. I'm thinking this the lower jaw and there is an area at the front where these two pieces may have been attached (I tried to show that in the third picture), but that would have made for a very narrow chin. I've added a few pictures so please let me know if you have questions that will help you identify the jaw bone. Thank you

Attached Thumbnails

  • P1010436r1.JPG
  • P1010440r1.JPG
  • P1010441r1.JPG
  • P1010442r1.JPG


#2 Auspex

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 02:56 PM

Rodent, for sure; very like a squirrel, but it seems too large.

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#3 obsessed1

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 02:58 PM

Possibly groundhog.

#4 edd

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 03:20 PM

Not a fossil though
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#5 Texas-Tunnel Rat

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 01:23 PM

Those are Rodent

Im thinking Muskrat or Groundhog, they are too large for Ground Squirrel. I wanted to say Rat or Rabbit but the back teeth sructure is different.

I have one that I collected same shape and everything just different back teeth, mine are leaf shapped and I know that it Rodent. If you want check to see if the replacement teeth are still inside the jaw (ONLY IF YOU ARE COMFTERABLE WITH IT, MINE ALREADY HAD IT ROTTING AWAY DONT RUIN SPECIMENS)

Still nice specimen to learn about the A&P of Rodents.
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Dallas Paleontology Society Occasional Papers Vol. 9 2011
"Pennsylvanian Stratigraphy and Paleoecology of Outcrops in Jacksboro, Texas"
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Texas Paleontology Society Feb, 2011
"Index Fossils and You" A primer on how to utilize fossils to assist in relative age dating strata"
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#6 jpc

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 11:03 PM

very definetly rodent lower jaws. The "tusks" are its incisors... its gnawing teeth. All rodents have them.

#7 Texas-Tunnel Rat

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 09:14 AM

very definetly rodent lower jaws. The "tusks" are its incisors... its gnawing teeth. All rodents have them.

Now do they have replacement incisors in their jawbone?
PUBLICATIONS
Dallas Paleontology Society Occasional Papers Vol. 9 2011
"Pennsylvanian Stratigraphy and Paleoecology of Outcrops in Jacksboro, Texas"
Author

Texas Paleontology Society Feb, 2011
"Index Fossils and You" A primer on how to utilize fossils to assist in relative age dating strata"
Author

Quotes
"Beer, Bacon, and Bivalves!"
"Say NO to illegal fossil buying / selling"
"They belong in a museum."

Education
Associates of Science - 2011
Bachelors of Science (Geology & Biology) - 2012 est.

#8 Auspex

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 10:52 AM

Now do they have replacement incisors in their jawbone?

A rodent's incisors grow continuously, throughout their very toothy lives.

Edited by tracer, 10 August 2011 - 11:17 AM.
modified for emphasis

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about."
-Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

 

Paleontology is an evolving science!


#9 Texas-Tunnel Rat

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 12:03 PM

A rodent's incisors grow continuously, throughout their very toothy lives.

Gotcha!

just thought I had a really odd rodent
PUBLICATIONS
Dallas Paleontology Society Occasional Papers Vol. 9 2011
"Pennsylvanian Stratigraphy and Paleoecology of Outcrops in Jacksboro, Texas"
Author

Texas Paleontology Society Feb, 2011
"Index Fossils and You" A primer on how to utilize fossils to assist in relative age dating strata"
Author

Quotes
"Beer, Bacon, and Bivalves!"
"Say NO to illegal fossil buying / selling"
"They belong in a museum."

Education
Associates of Science - 2011
Bachelors of Science (Geology & Biology) - 2012 est.

#10 Texas-Tunnel Rat

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 10:12 PM

Hey folks,

not sure if anyone is reading this.

I am sorry to say that I have misdiagnoised my last statment about the jaw bone I was compairing to the ones presented. I contacted my local veternarian and got it reconfirmed that it was not traditional rodent but it was either determined to be that of either a possum or a juvinile feline, proably a stray. So once again I am sorry for possibly leading in the wrong way.
PUBLICATIONS
Dallas Paleontology Society Occasional Papers Vol. 9 2011
"Pennsylvanian Stratigraphy and Paleoecology of Outcrops in Jacksboro, Texas"
Author

Texas Paleontology Society Feb, 2011
"Index Fossils and You" A primer on how to utilize fossils to assist in relative age dating strata"
Author

Quotes
"Beer, Bacon, and Bivalves!"
"Say NO to illegal fossil buying / selling"
"They belong in a museum."

Education
Associates of Science - 2011
Bachelors of Science (Geology & Biology) - 2012 est.

#11 Biscuit

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Posted 09 September 2011 - 08:11 AM

Groundhog or beaver jaw, google images should be able to help you make the final call.

#12 Sharkbyte

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Posted 09 September 2011 - 02:05 PM

I believe it might be a Woodchuck aka Groundhog Jawbone. Looks a lot like a squirrel but a little larger and the Molars look to be a dead ringer. By the way, welcome to the Forum.

Attached Thumbnails

  • woodchuck.jpg

Edited by Sharkbyte, 09 September 2011 - 02:14 PM.

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#13 PrehistoricFlorida

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Posted 09 September 2011 - 03:20 PM

Hey folks,

not sure if anyone is reading this.

I am sorry to say that I have misdiagnoised my last statment about the jaw bone I was compairing to the ones presented. I contacted my local veternarian and got it reconfirmed that it was not traditional rodent but it was either determined to be that of either a possum or a juvinile feline, proably a stray. So once again I am sorry for possibly leading in the wrong way.


Your local vet couldn't tell the different between opossum and feline dentition??? Might want to take your pet to another vet...

#14 edd

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Posted 09 September 2011 - 03:31 PM

Hahahhaha, vets these days...
"The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do."



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