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garyc

Alexandria

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garyc

I'll be in Alexandri next week. Can anyone point me to a place to access river gravel by foot. I really don't want to haul my canoe all the way from Houston. Thanks

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Auspex

Alexandria...Virginia?

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MikeDOTB

Alexandria...Virginia?

Ha ha, I immediately thought the same thing. As far as I know, there isnt any formations present that far up the Potomac is there? If there is, Im going to cry because I lived there for three years and didnt have a clue :(

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garyc

Alexandria, Louisiana. I've heard of mosasaur possibilities in some of the rivers there. Anyone?

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neovenator250

Alexandria, Louisiana. I've heard of mosasaur possibilities in some of the rivers there. Anyone?

Mosasaurs in Alexandria? I haven't heard anything about that. As far as I know, the only Cretaceous rocks in La get pushed up by the Salt domes in the west. Not sure of the geology of Alexandria, but Montgomery Landing is part of the Yazoo Clay (Eocene). I've gotten shark teeth and archaeocete whale teeth from there.

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Oxytropidoceras

garyc wrote;

"Alexandria, Louisiana. I've heard of mosasaur possibilities

in some of the rivers there. Anyone?"

and neovenator250 replied;

"Mosasaurs in Alexandria? I haven't heard anything about that.

As far as I know, the only Cretaceous rocks in La get pushed up

by the Salt domes in the west."

Neovenator250 is correct. The only Cretaceous rocks are those found on top of certain salt domes in Louisiana. There is a lack of any record of mosasaurs having been found in the Cretaceous strata exposed on top of Louisiana salt domes. The teeth of the shark, Squalicorax pristodontus have been found in exposures of the Maastrichtian Navarro Group directly overlying the Prothro salt dome in Bienville Parish, Louisiana. Go read:

Stringer, G. L. and M. Henry, 1996, First report of the Cretaceous

Shark Squalicorax from Louisiana. Mississippi Geology. vol. 17,

no. 2, pp. 40-42.

There is a brief mention of a Cretaceous shark tooth in:

Heinrich, P. V., 2001, Louisiana Geofacts. Public Information Series

no.6, Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 8 pp.

PDF file at http://www.lgs.lsu.e...s/6geofacts.pdf

and http://www.lgs.lsu.e...ntentpage14.php

Descriptions of the Cretaceous outcrops on top of Louisiana salt domes are found in:

Frey, R. C., and R. D. Kaiser, 1984, Surface exposures of Late Cretaceous

strata at the Rayburns Dome, Bienville Parish, Louisiana. Gulf Coast

Association of Geological Societies Transactions. vol. 34, pp. 357–361.

Butler, E. A., and D. K. Jones, 1957, Cretaceous Ostracoda of Prothro

and Rayburn's Salt Domes, Bienville Parish, Louisiana. Geological

Bulletin no. 32, Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

65 pp.

neovenator250 also stated;

"Not sure of the geology of Alexandria, but Montgomery Landing

is part of the Yazoo Clay (Eocene). I've gotten shark teeth and

archaeocete whale teeth from there."

Alexandria, Louisiana (or "Alex" as locals call it) lies on the Holocene floodplain of the Red River. As a result, there is not any fossil hunting within it. Across the Red River, Pleistocene sands and gravels and Miocene strata of the Fleming Group underlie the uplands. The Pleistocene sands and gravels contain fossil-bearing chert gravel and petrified wood that has been transported in from further upstream. The chert gravel contains Paleozoic fossils. The only fossils so far reported from the Miocene strata are various types of fossil leaves.

For further information about the geology of Alexandria, Louisiana go see:

Fisk, H. N., 1940, Geology of Avoyelles and Rapides Parishes. Geological

Bulletin no. 18, Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 240 pp.

McCulloh, R. P. and P. V. Heinrich, 2004, Alexandria, LA 30 X 60-minute

geologic quadrangle. Open-File Map 2004-05. Louisiana Geological

Survey, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Information about fossils in the Pleistocene gravels can be found at:

1. Fossil Hunting in Louisiana Gravels (PDF file) at

http://appl027.lsu.e...r Fossils 3.pdf

2. "Gravel Fossils" at either http://web.archive.o...te/gravel1.html

or http://web.archive.o...te/gravel1.html

Another web page about Louisiana fossil hunting is "Rockhounding

Louisiana" at http://www.gatorgirl.../louisiana.html

Fossils of Basilosaurus and numerous types of marine invertebrates have been found at Montgomery Landing, Grant Parish, in the past. Unfortunately, the stabilization of the Red River's channel for the Red River Waterway Project has stopped the Red River from eroding the cutbank at Montgomery Landing (Creole Bluff). As a result, the bluff, which once exposed fossiliferous Eocene strata, has completely slumped and been almost entirely covered by vegetation. The last time that I visited it about a year ago, the fossil-bearing strata was completely concealed by slopewash, slumped sediment, and vegetation. There were not any fossils to be either seen or collected.

For further information about Montgomery Landing, look at:

Fisk, H. N., 1938, Geology of Grant and La Salle Parishes. Geological

Bulletin no. 10, Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

246 pp.

Schiebout, J. A., and W. A. Van den Bold, eds.,1986, Montgomery Landing

Site, Marine Eocene (Jackson) of Central Louisiana: Proceedings of a

Symposium. Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies, Austin,

Texas, 238 pp.

Yours,

Paul H.

Edited by Oxytropidoceras

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