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Carl von Alt

Seeking Petrified Palm Wood Sites In Colorado

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Carl von Alt

I am seeking information on potential collecting sites in Colorado for petrified palm wood or ferns. Reportedly, examples are found along the South Platte River in Adams County, just northwest of Denver, but I have never had confirmation of any specific sites.

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kauffy

i have found some really nice leaf specimins and palm frond fragments at a site in CO. Only problem is i really have no idea where it was, i went there with my dad when i was younger and even he cant remember the specific site! I have also found a few nice conifer leaves in an offcut block of shale near Redstone but they were not from there.....sorry I cant help more but im sure you can find out from someone!

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Carl von Alt

Very likely you visited the public collecting area around the Florissant Fossil Beds just west of Colorado Springs where there are palm and fern leaf fossils along with conifers and others, along with some huge sequoia petrified wood. You and your family should come back to Colorado soon--there are a lot of fossil sites here!

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Carl von Alt

Thanks!

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artofextinction

Here is a site i found on a recent road trip,no palm wood but loads of leaf and grass fossils. heading west from walsenburg on highway 160 look for CR 340 turn left the road soon turns to dirt take the first right you can(it will be over a cattle trap into a feeding pen) you will see a small wooden shed turn right and park,A short walk upstream (west) will reveal a large coal seam? this stuff looks like coal ,burns like coal but has amber in it.not to sure about this stuff but the red orange sandstone on top of the bank is loaded with plant fossils.happy hunting...

Andre LuJan

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Carl von Alt

Thanks, I'll give that site a try.

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DDD

Here is a site i found on a recent road trip,no palm wood but loads of leaf and grass fossils. heading west from walsenburg on highway 160 look for CR 340 turn left the road soon turns to dirt take the first right you can(it will be over a cattle trap into a feeding pen) you will see a small wooden shed turn right and park,A short walk upstream (west) will reveal a large coal seam? this stuff looks like coal ,burns like coal but has amber in it.not to sure about this stuff but the red orange sandstone on top of the bank is loaded with plant fossils.happy hunting...

I happened to be passing through Walsenburg this last week and decided to stop to check out this site. I found the wooden shed as described but was unable to locate any significant river bank exposures to the west/upstream location (I walked about 200 meters). Perhaps I just did not explore far enough in the limited time I had. I did find a small bank just near the small bridge that you drive over and there was one small (half meter) block of the 'red orange' sandstone with some evident plant stem fragments in it, but not much else.

Has anyone else explored this site? Andre - might you be able to provide more detail on how far and where upstream you found the coal seam?

Dan

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penmaker

I have a petrified palm stump that was found in Downtown Denver during the construction of a parking garage at about 17th and Grant streets about 20 years ago. We took the Palm stump to the Natural Measum at Denver City park and the curator said that the wood is about 65,000 years old. The stump measures about 8 inches across and 14 inches tall. We are going to get a slice cut and polished to see what colors it has soon.

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jpc

I have a petrified palm stump that was found in Downtown Denver during the construction of a parking garage at about 17th and Grant streets about 20 years ago. We took the Palm stump to the Natural Measum at Denver City park and the curator said that the wood is about 65,000 years old. The stump measures about 8 inches across and 14 inches tall. We are going to get a slice cut and polished to see what colors it has soon.

Probably 65 million, not thousand years old... There were palms in Denver at the end of the Cretaceous, but not in the last 65K years. Just fact-checking.

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RickieLee

I live in North Eastern CO. The petrified wood found out here in farm country is usually dark brown to black. I find most of mine on the county gravel roads after a rain. I have been in a few gravel pits to look for the stuff but it is easier to spot on the roads.

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stubee5

i believe you can find some wood around Denver International Airport

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Eocenecarnage

There is place in Golden called Triceratops Trail. There are fossil impressions of palm leaves in one exposed wall of rock. There are also fossil footprints of Tyrannosaurus rex and Edmontosaurus. The site is administered by Dinosaur Ridge in Morrison and is a short walk and a concrete trail.

FYI: The site is near the Colorado School of Mines Geology Museum, which has an excellent collection of minerals, fossils, and meteorites on display.

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Eocenecarnage

You cannot collect fossils at Triceratops Trail

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jpc

You cannot collect fossils at Triceratops Trail

It is good to add this info. Yes, the site is a fossil preserve,as it were.

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