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Reptile And Amphibian Fossils In West Virginia?


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Where's a good location to hunt for them in WV?

Also can you find Megalodon teeth in WV, and if so where?

Edited by Fitch
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I don't know about reptile/amphibian sites, but there are no Megs to be found there.

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Thanks, that stinks, we don't have anything good here except for boring plants.

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No megalodons in WV.

A number of important Mississippian and Pennsylvanian amphibian and reptile specimens have come from West Virginia. Your best bet would be to hunt the tailings from coal mines. Vertebrate fossils are very rare in these deposits, and articulated specimens even more so. Also anything that you do find is likely to be of scientific importance, and would be much more useful in the hands of a paleontologist who is working on these fossils than in a private collection.

And plants are not boring (at least to some of us).

Don

Edited by FossilDAWG
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Compared to finding dinosaur fossils, and such, they're pretty boring.

Edited by Fitch
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Dinosaurs are pretty cool for sure. I was part of a group that found the most complete/best preserved dinosaur found to date in Alabama. But one dinosaur in 45 years doesn't make for a really exciting hobby. If you learn to appreciate the virtues of an exceptional plant, or snail, or coral, etc every collecting trip will have a decent chance of bringing the joy of an exceptional discovery.

Don

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Dinosaurs are pretty cool for sure. I was part of a group that found the most complete/best preserved dinosaur found to date in Alabama. But one dinosaur in 45 years doesn't make for a really exciting hobby. If you learn to appreciate the virtues of an exceptional plant, or snail, or coral, etc every collecting trip will have a decent chance of bringing the joy of an exceptional discovery.

Don

Well said, Don. If someone isn't diverse in where they find fascination, they will be bored many times in the field. I'm not really 'into' some fossils, either; but I can appreciate them for what they are.

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Fossildude19

I believe in the "If life hands you lemons..." adage. ;)

I agree - well said Don and John!! :)

If plants are what you can collect, well then, have at it! :D Enjoy it... there are people in places that have NO fossils, whatsoever! Horrible thought. :o

It takes a certain frame of mind to reconcile yourself to finding,collecting, and appreciating what's readily at hand in your area.

Otherwise, it takes time and money to go other places to hunt, or to collect from the "wild wild internets"! :rolleyes:

Regards

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Hi Fitch,

Trilobites are recorded at quite a few localities throughout WV. Check the attached link for an excellent chart listing the fossils of your state by county as I'm sure you will discover many great opportunities for collecting. Another good idea is to join a local rock/mineral/fossil club. Many of the sites listed may no longer be productive or accessible to collecting so it is always best to check first. Most of the trilobite faunas are up north although it looks like there are possibilities in Greenbrier and Monroe counties which are both close to Wyoming county.

Good Luck and please post photos! :D

LINK

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Thanks. :)

I was hopeing some had actually been found in Wyoming County, all I've ever found here is plant fossils.

Edited by Fitch
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Hoping to not even travel out of your county, huh? I wish I could even find plant fossils in my county :P

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  • 5 months later...

For those who believe plants are boring, check out RomanK's blogs. Most of these plants I have also found in the mine tailings in West Virginia. Lots of Devonian and Silurian critters to the east as well. One solution to fossil economy is a weekend camping trip to the chosen area, make it worth your while. Also we often hunt several sites in one area, if one disappoints , another usually rewards. One way to increase your enthusiasm is to share your fossils with kids, plant seeds !!!!

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Some may say that plants are boring ... I am not one of them, but I can say they have this much over dinosaurs: you find a plant fossil... you take it home. Cool. You find a dinosaur and you have a big project lined up that will take up the next ten years of your life.

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Some may say that plants are boring ... I am not one of them, but I can say they have this much over dinosaurs: you find a plant fossil... you take it home. Cool. You find a dinosaur and you have a big project lined up that will take up the next ten years of your life.

As my girlfriend says, "There it is" John
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  • 5 months later...
Muffynmonster

I live on the side of a ridge at approximately 1,700 feet above sea level and I have recently found a lot of rock with fossil shells imbedded in them. So far, I have found rock with at least a dozen different kinds of fossil remains.

Where can I go to get help identifying them?

Is there a particular book that will help?

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I live on the side of a ridge at approximately 1,700 feet above sea level and I have recently found a lot of rock with fossil shells imbedded in them. So far, I have found rock with at least a dozen different kinds of fossil remains.

Where can I go to get help identifying them?

Is there a particular book that will help?

If you have the wherewithal to take bright, sharp, closeup digital pictures of them, you can post them here in the "Fossil ID" forum, and we'll give it our best shot. :)

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Fossildude19

I live on the side of a ridge at approximately 1,700 feet above sea level and I have recently found a lot of rock with fossil shells imbedded in them. So far, I have found rock with at least a dozen different kinds of fossil remains.

Where can I go to get help identifying them?

Is there a particular book that will help?

Have you checked THIS WEBSITE?

Regards,

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  • 2 years later...

Where's a good location to hunt for them in WV?

Also can you find Megalodon teeth in WV, and if so where?

No Megalodon around here, but if you go down around (the counties of) Mercer, Monroe, Summers, and Greenbrier, those are Mississippian rocks, and you might find Greererpeton or other tetrapods; from Preston down to Wayne, Mingo, & McDowell is Pennsylvanian rock, rich in tetrapod amphibians, large insects, and some primitive reptiles. And from Putnam & Mason up to Ohio is Permian rock, if you're looking for mostly reptiles. Good luck if you're hunting there; Dimetrodon has left footprints in that area; maybe you'll find some bones! ;)

Sincerely,

Mr. Fossil

(West Virginian & proud of it) :D

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