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Coco

Hi,

 

Thanks Jess for this information !

 

Coco

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Woopaul5

Left to right

 

Otodus Ariculatus

Harleyville Fm Late Eocene

Harleyville, SC

3.70”

 

Otodus Angustidens

Chandler Bridge Fm 32-28 mya

Low Country, SC

5.02”

 

Otodus Megalodon 

Hawthorne Fm 

Savannah, GA

5.02”

 

Had to write a paper/presentation for a quick class I took. Decided to do a love of mine. Shark teeth.
 

86AEFCBA-DF32-4502-BA5E-25B969F6CFE8.jpeg

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Woopaul5

Otodus Megalodon

Yorktown fm (early Pliocene)

Aurora, NC

4.24”
 

not your typical lee creek colors 

F697279C-9D68-41AB-9AF3-077C254FF46C.jpeg

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FossilsAnonymous

Notorhyncus Cepedianus
Symphyseal tooth 

Brownies Beach, Maryland

5F0F926C-E664-4044-80BA-627D8AB1405C.jpeg.70f736a8085676246d46f4c8d87017b9.jpeg
7412885A-0A6E-486B-B8BB-0CE58D0BA620.jpeg.290f09ee9620ef18736f77cb7a5760b8.jpeg

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MikaelS
On 9/6/2019 at 10:38 AM, Untitled said:

Beautiful tooth!  I believe that Siversson mentioned awhile ago that most of these Russian teeth are actually described as Dwardius if memory serves correctly

edit

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MikaelS
On 9/6/2019 at 10:35 AM, isurus90064 said:

Not really a common tooth, but keeping it all in one thread.

 

From the iron ore mines near Stary Oskol

 

Dwardius woodwardi

 

~1.37" - 3.48cm

 

~113 - 100 Ma

Lower Cretaceous - Upper Albian
Seversk Sandstone

Stary Oskol

Belgorod Oblast

Russia

 

07.jpg.1f526351dfd7edadb4312970e23f309e.jpg08.jpg.4885a85f89aa0f661dba6a58dcd1333e.jpg

The species vraconensis belongs indeed to the genus Cretoxyrhina (see Siverson, Ward and Kelley 2013).

 

I would refer the tooth in the picture to the first upper anterior tooth file of Dwardius sp. The nominal Pseudoisurus siversoni (most likely a Dwardius) is the only cardabiodontid named from the upper Albian of Stary Oskol but I regard it as a nomen dubium (see Siversson & Machalski, 2017). 

 

As explained in the latter publication I now regard the Cardabiodontidae to include two described genera; Cardabiodon and Dwardius.

 

To make things even more complicated, the nominal genus Pseudoisurus is most likely the senior synonym of Dwardius or (somewhat less likely) Cardabiodon. This taxonomic mess was described in detail in Siverson & Machalski 2017. This is what happens when you describe new nominal species based on poor and/or insufficiently illustrated and subsequently misplaced/lost material (e.g. 'Pseudoisurus' siversoni and Pseudoisurus tomosus). The unofficial 'type' of Pseudoisurus tomosus is still lost.

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