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Coco

Hi,

 

Thanks Jess for this information !

 

Coco

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Woopaul5

Left to right

 

Otodus Ariculatus

Harleyville Fm Late Eocene

Harleyville, SC

3.70”

 

Otodus Angustidens

Chandler Bridge Fm 32-28 mya

Low Country, SC

5.02”

 

Otodus Megalodon 

Hawthorne Fm 

Savannah, GA

5.02”

 

Had to write a paper/presentation for a quick class I took. Decided to do a love of mine. Shark teeth.
 

86AEFCBA-DF32-4502-BA5E-25B969F6CFE8.jpeg

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Woopaul5

Otodus Megalodon

Yorktown fm (early Pliocene)

Aurora, NC

4.24”
 

not your typical lee creek colors 

F697279C-9D68-41AB-9AF3-077C254FF46C.jpeg

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FossilsAnonymous

Notorhyncus Cepedianus
Symphyseal tooth 

Brownies Beach, Maryland

5F0F926C-E664-4044-80BA-627D8AB1405C.jpeg.70f736a8085676246d46f4c8d87017b9.jpeg
7412885A-0A6E-486B-B8BB-0CE58D0BA620.jpeg.290f09ee9620ef18736f77cb7a5760b8.jpeg

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MikaelS
On 9/6/2019 at 10:38 AM, Untitled said:

Beautiful tooth!  I believe that Siversson mentioned awhile ago that most of these Russian teeth are actually described as Dwardius if memory serves correctly

edit

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MikaelS
On 9/6/2019 at 10:35 AM, isurus90064 said:

Not really a common tooth, but keeping it all in one thread.

 

From the iron ore mines near Stary Oskol

 

Dwardius woodwardi

 

~1.37" - 3.48cm

 

~113 - 100 Ma

Lower Cretaceous - Upper Albian
Seversk Sandstone

Stary Oskol

Belgorod Oblast

Russia

 

07.jpg.1f526351dfd7edadb4312970e23f309e.jpg08.jpg.4885a85f89aa0f661dba6a58dcd1333e.jpg

The species vraconensis belongs indeed to the genus Cretoxyrhina (see Siverson, Ward and Kelley 2013).

 

I would refer the tooth in the picture to the first upper anterior tooth file of Dwardius sp. The nominal Pseudoisurus siversoni (most likely a Dwardius) is the only cardabiodontid named from the upper Albian of Stary Oskol but I regard it as a nomen dubium (see Siversson & Machalski, 2017). 

 

As explained in the latter publication I now regard the Cardabiodontidae to include two described genera; Cardabiodon and Dwardius.

 

To make things even more complicated, the nominal genus Pseudoisurus is most likely the senior synonym of Dwardius or (somewhat less likely) Cardabiodon. This taxonomic mess was described in detail in Siverson & Machalski 2017. This is what happens when you describe new nominal species based on poor and/or insufficiently illustrated and subsequently misplaced/lost material (e.g. 'Pseudoisurus' siversoni and Pseudoisurus tomosus). The unofficial 'type' of Pseudoisurus tomosus is still lost.

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NSRhunter
On 11/1/2019 at 1:56 AM, Woopaul5 said:

Left to right

 

Otodus Ariculatus

Harleyville Fm Late Eocene

Harleyville, SC

3.70”

 

Otodus Angustidens

Chandler Bridge Fm 32-28 mya

Low Country, SC

5.02”

 

Otodus Megalodon 

Hawthorne Fm 

Savannah, GA

5.02”

 

Had to write a paper/presentation for a quick class I took. Decided to do a love of mine. Shark teeth.
 

86AEFCBA-DF32-4502-BA5E-25B969F6CFE8.jpeg

Wow would love to see more pics of that massive angy! 5.02 you say?

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Woopaul5
On 12/15/2019 at 1:34 PM, NSRhunter said:

Wow would love to see more pics of that massive angy! 5.02 you say?


It has repair to the backside of the root and I think tip also. Chandler bridge is super acidic and dissolves the roots on a lot of finds 

8E143892-64A2-4453-B996-95E6B67099D6.jpeg

2FE1554A-0C06-416B-8023-60AC70B8E6C2.jpeg

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Chase_E

I really need to get more into posting on this website. I'll contribute some to this forum post more! 

 

Jaekelotodus robustus 

 

2.91 cm = 1.15 in

 

Claiborne Group (Most likely the Lisbon Formation)

 

Upper Ypresian to Bartonian 

 

Conecuh River, Alabama 

 

 

The nicest specimen I own from this species. 

 

rjARV+OxQ+2a97Zvzfg6Fw.jpg

sOb23k7UQiyjS8CUqm1BMA.jpg

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siteseer
On 12/20/2019 at 10:43 PM, Chase_E said:

I really need to get more into posting on this website. I'll contribute some to this forum post more! 

 

Jaekelotodus robustus 

 

2.91 cm = 1.15 in

 

Claiborne Group (Most likely the Lisbon Formation)

 

Upper Ypresian to Bartonian 

 

Conecuh River, Alabama 

 

 

The nicest specimen I own from this species. 

 

rjARV+OxQ+2a97Zvzfg6Fw.jpg

sOb23k7UQiyjS8CUqm1BMA.jpg

 

 

I assume that is a rare find at the Conecuh River site(s).  I have just a few teeth from the Conecuh and they are labeled as "Tallahatta Formation" which I've wondered about because I've seen some sizable Striatolamia from it and enough that I thought the teeth were Lutetian in age and more likely from the Lisbon which is middle Eocene.

 

In the time I've collected shark teeth that tooth has changed names at least twice depending on who you talk to.  It would seem a simpler form worthy of a separate genus compared to other teeth referred to Jaekelotodus but I understand your label based on what some researchers have said.  Jaekelotodus teeth seem to be quite variable per jaw position and across the life of the individual with the genus surviving longer on the eastern edge of its paleogeographic range.  At first glance and based on how I've understood a tooth like that, I couldn't help but call it Hypotodus robustus.

 

 

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Chase_E

Yeah, eocene teeth are still somewhat debated on what they should be named. I use Ebersole (2019) as well as another Cappetta, Case paper. I’ve got a dozen or so Striatolamia that are 2.4 inches or so.  

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siteseer

It's time to get this thread rolling again.  Here's a Carcharodon hastalis tooth that isn't remarkable for its size (2 1/4 inches) but for its preservation.  For some reason manganese formed almost just at and around the dental band (= neck) on the lingual side of the tooth.  It sets off the light-colored crown from the light brown root.

 

You could call the dental band a "bourlette" too but I tend to call it that when it is more prominent and chevron-shaped as in Parotodus and Carcharocles.

 

This tooth was collected by Bob Ernst around 2004 from the Middle Miocene Sharktooth Hill Bonebed, Bakersfield, California..

 

sth_blkstr1.jpg

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siteseer

Here's another STH C. hastalis.  This one is 2 3/4 inches and has an unusual color combination for the bonebed.  It's light-colored in the middle but light blue near the edges.

sth_lblu2.jpg

sth_lblue1.jpg

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siteseer

And yet another STH Carcharodon hastalis.  This one sort of shades in part from a black to a dark blue.  It's an uncommon color combo I've seen only from the "west quarry," which I understand is no longer part of the Ernst property.  This tooth measures just under 2 1/2 inches.

 

Jess

sth_dblu_hast1.jpg

sth_dblu_hast2.jpg

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Woopaul5
On 1/27/2020 at 6:16 PM, siteseer said:

And yet another STH Carcharodon hastalis.  This one sort of shades in part from a black to a dark blue.  It's an uncommon color combo I've seen only from the "west quarry," which I understand is no longer part of the Ernst property.  This tooth measures just under 2 1/2 inches.

 

Jess

sth_dblu_hast1.jpg

sth_dblu_hast2.jpg


Love the blue and red colors that come out of there!!!

 

I believe the Carusco family bought the land surrounding Ernst’s quarry. Too bad I never had a chance to go to slow curve before it was dug out. 
 

I’ll post more after the Tucson show weekend 

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isurus90064

Hey Woopaul5, it's funny that you mention that .. I'm currently in Tucson and ran into Ray Caruso yesterday, who I met around 26-27 years ago at the Laguna Beach "Sawdust Art Festival" and had not seen since then.

 

@Woopaul5 very nice teeth!!

@Chase_E @FossilsAnonymous great colors on that Jaekelotodus .. fantastic Notorynchus, tx!

 

@siteseer beautiful sth makos .. interesting how the manganese only attached to the dental band and thanks for getting things rolling again.

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isurus90064
On 12/4/2019 at 7:21 PM, MikaelS said:

The species vraconensis belongs indeed to the genus Cretoxyrhina (see Siverson, Ward and Kelley 2013).

 

I would refer the tooth in the picture to the first upper anterior tooth file of Dwardius sp. The nominal Pseudoisurus siversoni (most likely a Dwardius) is the only cardabiodontid named from the upper Albian of Stary Oskol but I regard it as a nomen dubium (see Siversson & Machalski, 2017). 

 

As explained in the latter publication I now regard the Cardabiodontidae to include two described genera; Cardabiodon and Dwardius.

 

To make things even more complicated, the nominal genus Pseudoisurus is most likely the senior synonym of Dwardius or (somewhat less likely) Cardabiodon. This taxonomic mess was described in detail in Siverson & Machalski 2017. This is what happens when you describe new nominal species based on poor and/or insufficiently illustrated and subsequently misplaced/lost material (e.g. 'Pseudoisurus' siversoni and Pseudoisurus tomosus). The unofficial 'type' of Pseudoisurus tomosus is still lost.

 

 

Hello Mikael,

 

Thanks for your reply. I read your paper when it just came out and I will have to re-read it to remind myself of the taxonomic spaghetti you outlined. In the meantime I edited the original post to Dwardius sp. to stay consistent. Unfortunately that does not automatically edit your quoted version of the original to the same.

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siteseer
On 1/29/2020 at 8:01 AM, Woopaul5 said:


Love the blue and red colors that come out of there!!!

 

I believe the Carusco family bought the land surrounding Ernst’s quarry. Too bad I never had a chance to go to slow curve before it was dug out. 
 

I’ll post more after the Tucson show weekend 

 

Hi Woopaul5,

 

I like the blue ones.  You see less of those.  I've seen some light blue teeth that came out of another STH dig but I don't know where.  The collector really got into shark teeth for a while.  He hunted down all kinds of old articles and spent time screening for micros and then he lost interest and got into something else.  He sent me a sample of what he was finding - good stuff including a small section of Echinorhinus dermal denticles still connected.

 

Yeah, Slow Curve was good but Bob's "west side," the west quarry, was better.  The teeth and bones are better mineralized.  Some of the bones are a dark brown color which you don't see much off elsewhere in the bonebed that I've seen.

 

Jess

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Woopaul5

Otodus Megalodon

Early Miocene

West Java, Indonesia

Telisa Formation

BBF7F03B-C0FD-4EBD-B97B-2D9628622DD9.jpeg

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Woopaul5

Otodus Megalodon

Late Miocene/Early Pliocene

Quezon Province, Philippines 

224C2585-10B0-4D17-8507-B7ABFE09A712.jpeg

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Woopaul5

I have plenty more to share. Just give me a little time as I deleted some pics. Just got to pull them off of social media or retake them. Thanks

 

-Paul 

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caldigger

We'll be right here patiently waiting.

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indominus rex

Not in the best of shape but you gotta appreciate those colours. Indonesian Otodus Megalodon. Also the side is slightly patho, having some curves and ripples.

61AA6DAC-ED1A-46D8-80D1-15CAB6444792.jpeg

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Woopaul5

Otodus Auriculatus

Mid to Late Eocene

Santee Lime Fm

Harleyville, SC

 

3.70”

3.72”

33DBA895-7CE7-4964-98B8-478C5FC9B6B3.jpeg

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isurus90064

@Woopaul5 great teeth, great locations, fantastic colors on that tooth from the Philippines!!!

@indominus rex beautiful colors indeed!!

 

Thanks for posting some great additions guys!

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