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Guest N.AL.hunter

For The New Collectors,

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Guest Nicholas   
Guest Nicholas

Pinned. :) I agree completely with this topic it, yes there will always be interesting rocks that look like fossils I've done it and I think everyone has. I think more research on the finders part it needed.

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sparkchaser    0
sparkchaser

It's a good idea but you can't count on people reading stickied/pinned items before posting or using the search function for that matter.

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Serack    0
Serack

the link doesn't seem to work for me

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Guest solius symbiosus   
Guest solius symbiosus

Neither, did it work for me. HERE is a link to a Wiki page on pseudofossils.

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JimC    0
JimC
the link doesn't seem to work for me

Didn't work for me either but I copy/pasted it into the address bar and it worked. Very neat even if it ain't a fossil

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pleecan    21
pleecan

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Shamalama    114
Shamalama

Cool Rock! Those are Psuedofossils, but thee neat thing is that they are likely Salt Crystal impressions. As Dolomite is formed in fairly saline conditions it is not surprising. I'll post a photo of some I found a few years back later.

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pleecan    21
pleecan

Cool Rock! Those are Psuedofossils, but thee neat thing is that they are likely Salt Crystal impressions. As Dolomite is formed in fairly saline conditions it is not surprising. I'll post a photo of some I found a few years back later.

You are correct... the psuedo fossils are created by salt crystal impression as this area during the Silurian age was believed to be a hypersaline lagoon filled with eurypterids and the shore line had Cooksonia thriving on the banks. PL

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goldenorb    2
goldenorb

What was 'fooling me' in several respects is the formations...

ref: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?showtopic=10451

I have noticed that corals do form patterns, like fractals. I have studied corals in their real environment when diving, and know that they are organized, but separate: colonies.. of living things that mass together to form a group.

This lead to my original puzzlement. Also noticed what could be considered a 'crystal' pattern, but could not discern the difference, as I know very little to date about fossils...so came here for answers, knowing a group such as this held within it people more studied than me on these matters.

edit part: I did google this, extensively, and still came up with no discernable answer, so asked here for help

Edited by goldenorb

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bear-dog    4
bear-dog
:unsure: I agree as well.Keep in mind though in central Fl.we have fossil mud/clay balls with fossils inside.Have found anything from blades of grass to shark teeth.

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Harry Pristis    1,770
Harry Pristis

:unsure: I agree as well.Keep in mind though in central Fl.we have fossil mud/clay balls with fossils inside.Have found anything from blades of grass to shark teeth.

Can you show us an example of a Florida fossil mud-ball with fossils inside? I've never seen one from Florida. Generally, where do you go in Florida to collect fossil mud-balls?

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myboyscout    0
myboyscout

post-3661-021206900 1279231213_thumb.jpgI am new to this site and would like for some one to id this fossil for me.

Thought at first it was a tooth but after a closer look I think it maybe a finn from a fish.

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Auspex    1,717
Auspex

post-3661-021206900 1279231213_thumb.jpgI am new to this site and would like for some one to id this fossil for me.

Thought at first it was a tooth but after a closer look I think it maybe a finn from a fish.

Hi there!

Here's what I'd like to ask you to do:

>Start a new topic in the ID section, instead of adding it to an existing one.

>Take a sharp, well-lit picture, with a ruler for scale.

>Tell us where it was found.

This should fast-track your answer by getting it to a large audience and providing them with what they need to propose an ID. :)

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Boo    0
Boo

I was fooled awhile back - found in Wyoming what appeared to be a fossilized creature in scoria.

After consulting several Palentologists, the general consensus was that the mysterious figure eas formed by air bubbles in the scoria!

post-6402-0-81850500-1311402402_thumb.jpg

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fossil dude    0
fossil dude

I was fooled awhile back - found in Wyoming what appeared to be a fossilized creature in scoria.

After consulting several Palentologists, the general consensus was that the mysterious figure eas formed by air bubbles in the scoria!

weird air bubble huh? way weird man!!!!!!

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Rtinkler    1
Rtinkler

Thank you in advance for helping with anything that I post. I understand the frustration with people that may post prematurely. You see, some people will come to the forums because they know that you guys are the ones that see a lot and are very knowledgeable because it is your passion. I am a full time mother of 2 boys and work a 40 hr week. I love to rock hunt in what spare time I have (which is very little). I sometimes find things that I do not want to get rid of and are questionable. You guys are very important in helping people like me. I appreciate the help I might acquire from you people. If not for people like you, things would sit in a box somewhere and be lost or hidden forever. I try to id on my own but...there are so many things that look like something else. Your knowledge is appreciated and I hope I do not bring on any frustration :)

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dragonsfly    7
dragonsfly

Since this is for beginners " I would suggest, If it looks different: in color, texture,composition, pattern...keep it till you find out WHY". This is the best way to learn. I have found nautiloids that looked little more than concretions. Just because you can't identify something YET doesn't mean it won't be the prize of your collection when you finally do. Some of my best fossils were no more than compacted dirt inside a concretion, if I hadn't recognized them as having potential and coated them with glue/water solution, they would be gone. Be cautious, Be curious, don't be in a hurry. It is better to end up with a bucket of Psudofossils than to throw out one important piece you undervalued. John

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Herb    359
Herb

Don't be afraid to ask the questions. Everytime I collect I get home and go through my specimens and always have a couple that I look at and ask myself "why did I pick this up?" Most of the time it's just a rock, but sometime you find something neat. Besides, all true fossil collectors have a "rock" garden.

The only stupid question is the one not asked. Happy hunting!!

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