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Kosmoceras

Show Us Your Bird Fossils!

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Kosmoceras

Hi all,

I thought it would be interesting to see your bird fossils. i have been told they are rare, but I know you guys have some fantastic ones. Can't wait to see them! :D

Well, lets start it of:

St Marks River Florida, 2 Million Years old, Pleistocene, USA. Cormorant.

post-4683-0-70594600-1322234454_thumb.jpg

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piranha

Hi Thomas,

Attached is my pride and joy bird fossil. Liaoxiornis delicatus is from the early Cretaceous Yixian Formation of Liaoning Province, China. This genus of Enantiornithine, meaning "opposite bird", was the smallest avialan of the Mesozoic with distinguishing features unlike modern birds and a possible key to understanding the evolution of Avian flight. The example posted is 12 cm in length with teeth intact and superb articulation and preservation.

Enjoy! :D

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Kosmoceras
:o :eat popcorn:

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fossilshk

Hi Thomas,

Attached is my pride and joy bird fossil. Liaoxiornis delicatus is from the early Cretaceous Yixian Formation of Liaoning Province, China. This genus of Enantiornithine, meaning "opposite bird", was the smallest avialan of the Mesozoic with distinguishing features unlike modern birds and a possible key to understanding the evolution of Avian flight. The example posted is 12 cm in length with teeth intact and superb articulation and preservation. Also included is a paper with a wonderful fossil and reconstruction of skeletal elements. Enjoy! :D

Quite beautiful fossil bird :drool: . Prepared by yourself?

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Boesse

This isn't exactly in my personal collection as I collected this under a research permit, but this is UCMP 219007 from the Purisima Formation, a partial humerus of Pelagornis sp., one of the youngest specimens known worldwide. Bobby

Edit: I published this find with my colleague Dr. Adam Smith back in May. Here's the citation:

Boessenecker, R.W. and N.A. Smith. 2011. Latest Pacific basin record of a bony-toothed bird (Aves, Pelagornithidae) from the Pliocene Purisima Formation of California, U.S.A. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 31(3):652-657.

post-225-0-14022300-1322253246_thumb.jpg

Edited by Boesse

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Kosmoceras

Fantastic!

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CH4ShotCaller

Truly awesome! I hear they find some at Fossil Butte near Kemmemer, Wyoming. I'll never find one, but I enjoy seeing them. Great collection!

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Lloyd

Edit: I published this find with my colleague Dr. Adam Smith back in May. Here's the citation:

Boessenecker, R.W. and N.A. Smith. 2011. Latest Pacific basin record of a bony-toothed bird (Aves, Pelagornithidae) from the Pliocene Purisima Formation of California, U.S.A. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 31(3):652-657.

Small world. I've known Adam since he was a struggling undergrad in Kentucky...

Edited by Lloyd

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astron

Hi Thomas,

Attached is my pride and joy bird fossil. Liaoxiornis delicatus is from the early Cretaceous Yixian Formation of Liaoning Province, China. This genus of Enantiornithine, meaning "opposite bird", was the smallest avialan of the Mesozoic with distinguishing features unlike modern birds and a possible key to understanding the evolution of Avian flight. The example posted is 12 cm in length with teeth intact and superb articulation and preservation. Also included is a paper with a wonderful fossil and reconstruction of skeletal elements. Enjoy! :D

One of ''The collection'' stars is shining :sword:

Thanks, Scott, and for the surrounding infos ;):)

Edited by astron

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astron

This isn't exactly in my personal collection as I collected this under a research permit, but this is UCMP 219007 from the Purisima Formation, a partial humerus of Pelagornis sp., one of the youngest specimens known worldwide. Bobby

Edit: I published this find with my colleague Dr. Adam Smith back in May. Here's the citation:

Boessenecker, R.W. and N.A. Smith. 2011. Latest Pacific basin record of a bony-toothed bird (Aves, Pelagornithidae) from the Pliocene Purisima Formation of California, U.S.A. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 31(3):652-657.

Neat find and job B)

Thanks for showing ;)

Edited by astron

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Boesse

Thanks guys! Lloyd, you'll be happy to know that Adam is now a successful researcher with a freshly minted Ph.D., and is a postdoc at NESCENT in North Carolina.

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Lloyd

Thanks Boesse... I've kept in touch over the years so knew he took the walk this past summer and is now back in NC where his PhD quest started.

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piranha

One of ''The collection'' stars is shining :sword:

Thanks, Scott, and for the surrounding infos ;):)

Thank you Astrinos and to the others for their nice comments as well. :D

Look forward to seeing a few more fossil birds perched in this thread... :P

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astron

Look forward to seeing a few more fossil birds perched in this thread... :P

Chas hasn't seen this topic :P:)

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grampa dino

If I could find it I would show the bird ungual ( claw ) (cretaceous, late) I have some where around here :wacko:

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parrotparrot333

Linxia, China

Age: Miocene

post-6605-0-91228100-1322504206_thumb.jpg

post-6605-0-21074400-1322504220_thumb.jpg

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Kosmoceras

Very nice! You found it?

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Kosmoceras

Small bird feather from France! :)

post-4683-0-23293800-1324979116_thumb.jpg

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Sinopaleus

Linxia, China

Age: Miocene

这鸟是从临夏来的?这是我第一次见过一个从甘肃来的鸟。它的科学名是什么...? :o

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Kosmoceras

这鸟是从临夏来的?这是我第一次见过一个从甘肃来的鸟。它的科学名是什么...? :o

That translates to:

This bird come fromLinxia? This is the first time I saw a bird from Gansu. Its scientific name is....?

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Auspex

That translates to:

This bird come fromLinxia? This is the first time I saw a bird from Gansu. Its scientific name is....?

Here, then, is another; the skull of a small ostrich (sp. ind.):

post-423-0-25663900-1325185914_thumb.jpg

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piranha

Here, then, is another; the skull of a small ostrich (sp. ind.):

post-423-0-25663900-1325185914_thumb.jpg

Something new Chas? That one is incredible... please tell us the particulars: age, formation, etc. :D

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Auspex

Something new Chas? That one is incredible... please tell us the particulars: age, formation, etc. :D

I've had this for quite a while. It is from the late Miocene of the Linxia Basin, Gansu, China; from an old collection, it was prepped by Marc Behrendt, and the species is (thus far) indeterminate.

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Sinopaleus

That's interesting. I'll show my professional chinese vertebrate paleontologist who specializes in Gansu fossils, if you don't mind? Perhaps he might have an answer...

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Auspex

Thank you, I'd appreciate that!

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