Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
chele

Photographic Light Set

Recommended Posts

chele

My husband uses this website alot. It is all military surplus. I cruise the listings sometimes and found these light sets. Would these work for photographing fossils. I have been searching for lights so I can take indoor photos so I do not have to drag stuff outside. Here is the page. http://www.govliquid...4&convertTo=USD

Blaine has bought a lot of stuff from here and has gotten some very good deals. You just never know what you will find at this site.

Edited by chele

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
painshill

Hi Chele

That would be fine for black and white photography, but not for colour. The “K: 3200” reference is what’s known as “colour temperature”. Normal daylight is between 5000K and 6500K depending on time of day and other conditions. Photographic flash is a good substitute at 5500K to 6000K.

As you move away from those values, the light will introduce a colour cast into your pictures. For a photoflood light with a colour temperature of 3200K, the cast will be distinctly orange. You can correct for this with a blue 80A filter (available from any photographic shop for about 10 Pounds/ 15 Dollars)… providing you are using a camera that has a way to attach the filter. Alternatively, you can get filters which fit over the light itself. That would be more expensive, unless the filter is already included in the kit.

Any filter of that type will reduce the amount of light reaching the camera. The 80A filter has a “factor” of 4, which means that it cuts the light down to 1/16th of its original value. You would need increase the camera aperture by 4 f-stops to maintain the light level. Not good.

If you have a swanky digital camera, it might have an automatic digital compensation mode. Check your manual to see if it has a “Tungsten Light” setting. If it has, you should be OK.

Note also that the light will generate a fair amount of heat.

Hope that helps.

Roger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
painshill

Sorry, I should also have added that digital pics can of course be colour-corrected afterwards, in a photo-editing programme. Top-end programmes like Photoshop will do this automatically on a one-click basis but cheaper programmes may require you to play around with the RGB settings until you achieve something that looks like normal lighting (which would be a pain). Check what your current editor offers you.

Roger

Edited by painshill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
grampa dino

That looks like one nice lighting kit ( ??price) but it dose look kie a little bit of over kill.

I use a light box that cost about $100;Canadian ( I really like it)

I have used goose neck desk lamps, ebook clamp on lights, both work and don't cost that much

The ebook lights, I got a set at Coast co for $1400

post-310-0-79388100-1322437310_thumb.jpgpost-310-0-51113300-1322437374_thumb.jpgpost-310-0-51106100-1322437434_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Pristis

The new compact flourescent bulbs come in a "daylight" (6500K) version that you can use in any (non-dimming) fixture and produce very little heat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×