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Wrangellian

Some Recent Acquisitions

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Wrangellian

Some recent acquisitions that I think are 'pretty cool' B) ... If you know any of my data to be incorrect, please let me know.

Graptolite: Cyrtograptus murchisoni

Silurian, Wenlockian ~425my

Builth Wells, Wales

post-4372-0-83878400-1325135617_thumb.jpg

details:

post-4372-0-14367900-1325135735_thumb.jpg post-4372-0-15155800-1325135754_thumb.jpg

Edited by Wrangellian

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Wrangellian

Conulariid: Conularia quichua Ulrich 1890

Lower Dev. Sicasica Fm,

Patacamaya, ~100km S of La Paz, Bolivia

post-4372-0-97535100-1325136065_thumb.jpg

Though it didn't break cleanly, I like this one because it's intact almost all the way down to the tip.

Receptaculitid (Sponge? Chlorophyte alga?):

Receptaculites occidentalis Salter

Ordo.: Upper Sandbian? = Mowhawkian: ?Upper Turinian

Black River Group

Mascot, Knox Co., TN

post-4372-0-49002400-1325136328_thumb.jpg post-4372-0-13426400-1325136309_thumb.jpg

(I see lots of people put more than 2MB-worth of pics in a single post - how do they do that??)

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Missourian

Nice pieces.

The receptaculitids are always fascinating. They are chlorophyte algae, dasyclads to be exact.

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Wrangellian

OK, if you're confident of that I'll mark it as such. I have another alga, Coleochaete Parka decipiens that I will post also, as soon as I get it off the camera.

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Lloyd

Nice specimens. Even if it didn't break cleanly, I really like that Conulariid.

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Ludwigia

Sorry I can't give an opinion on your IDs but they are very nice specimens.

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Wrangellian

Thanks Ludwigia, I'm happy with the IDs unless someone happens to know there is something to correct or add.

Here is the other one I meant to include:

Early 'land plant' (freshwater green algae): Parka decipiens,

Lower Dev. Old Red Sandstone,

Carmyllie Series (=Group?),

Forfar, Angus, Scotland.

This was billed as the only known fossil representative of the Coleochaetales - probably related to earliest land plants. U. Sil. to L. Dev. range.

post-4372-0-81081800-1325387663_thumb.jpg

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xonenine

Thanks Ludwigia, I'm happy with the IDs unless someone happens to know there is something to correct or add.

Here is the other one I meant to include:

Early 'land plant' (freshwater green algae): Parka decipiens,

Lower Dev. Old Red Sandstone,

Carmyllie Series (=Group?),

Forfar, Angus, Scotland.

This was billed as the only known fossil representative of the Coleochaetales - probably related to earliest land plants. U. Sil. to L. Dev. range.

post-4372-0-81081800-1325387663_thumb.jpg

wow Eric, this is so nice!The whole batch is, but these I'd really like to read about, you have anything on them?

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Wrangellian

Thanks Carmine, It's not as nice as some of the other ones I see doing a Google Image search! But maybe those are exceptional examples - at least Ive got a specimen, incomplete tho it may be. Just doing a quick search there is a little about them here:

http://steurh.home.xs4all.nl/eng/parka.html

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Missourian

Thanks Ludwigia, I'm happy with the IDs unless someone happens to know there is something to correct or add.

Here is the other one I meant to include:

Early 'land plant' (freshwater green algae): Parka decipiens,

Lower Dev. Old Red Sandstone,

Carmyllie Series (=Group?),

Forfar, Angus, Scotland.

This was billed as the only known fossil representative of the Coleochaetales - probably related to earliest land plants. U. Sil. to L. Dev. range.

post-4372-0-81081800-1325387663_thumb.jpg

I love it. It has an almost 'alien' appearance like some of the ediacaran creatures.

Algae can be neglected as they are kind of stuck between 'plants' and 'invertebrates', yet they can also be spectacular.

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Wrangellian

I agree, they may not capture people's imagination like a dinosaur or shark but they are one of the Earth's denizens and one of the oldest, so they are just as interesting to me and I'll collect them wherever I can get them. I should post a pic of my Mary Ellen Mine stromatolite, it is beautiful and often used for lapidary but a good example of Earth's earliest forms of life (or the traces left by it, if you will)....

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