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Anna

Two And A Half Teeth.

13 posts in this topic

John found the first two teeth recently in North Sulphur River (Cretaceous) and has asked me to post them here for id. The larger of the two is definintely mineralized--the encrustations on the lingual surfaces are rock hard. The smaller "half" tooth also does not appear to be recent.

The third tooth fragment isn't much to look at, and it may not be identifiable, but I was real shocked to find it--in an area recently excavated here in the Kiamichi formation. (Right across the road from our farm.) I though, if anyone has any ideas, it would be kinda cool to know. Normally we only find Texigryphaea sp. and the occasional ammonite until you get closer to the Goodland Limestone exposures around the lake.

John wants to say "Thanks!"

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#2

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#3

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1 bovidae?

2 canidae?

Anyway, they are from the recent upper sediments and not from Creataceous :(

Edited by Nandomas

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This one reminds me of a "Bison" tooth

post-6417-0-86774200-1328298477_thumb.jpg

Check out this web page: Link

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I've been thinking bison on the first one...certainly doesn't match up to the juvenile and adult cow skulls we have here.

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x2 for Bovidae.

post-45-0-31784400-1328300964_thumb.jpg post-45-0-28918000-1328300998_thumb.jpg

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Matching loose bison teeth with found jaws...might be interesting,

however, it isn't a process for identification

post-6417-0-26170300-1328300903_thumb.jpg

See the stylid on the side of the tooth. It appears as a little "donut"

of enamel at mid-tooth. This stylid is a feature that is used to

distinguish loose bison teeth from cow teeth.

Web Page: Link

Edited by Indy

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Two and a half men, im sorry i had to write it LOL

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See the stylid on the side of the tooth. It appears as a little "donut"

of enamel at mid-tooth. This stylid is a feature that is used to

distinguish loose bison teeth from cow teeth.

Web Page: Link

I have heard that both modern cattle and bison had stylids on some lower teeth. Here's link to a photo of a cow jaw:

http://www.istockpho...ow-jaw-bone.php

and here is a different photo:

post-2301-0-03612000-1328354896_thumb.jpg

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'Al Dente' is correct . . . cows often do have stylids on their cheek teeth. It is common to see stylids on the deciduous teeth of cows. But, these cow stylids are usually weak and thin-walled when compared to the robust teeth of bison. In fact, the cow stylids often fall away once the cementum of the tooth is gone.

I think the tooth in question here is probably a cow m3 with the weak stylid held in place by the residual cementum. Keep in mind that differentiation of isolated teeth of closely-related species may be more art than science. Compare the tooth with this bison tooth:

post-42-0-42144400-1328376770_thumb.jpgpost-42-0-31915200-1328376801_thumb.jpg

post-42-0-91689100-1328376876_thumb.jpg

The canid half-tooth is about the right size for a coyote, but domestic dog (or some other dog) is possible. Compare it with these coyote teeth:

post-42-0-64799400-1328376922_thumb.jpg

The third tooth reminds me of a bison or cow P2. Compare it with the P2 in the image above.

These images are in my "Teeth & Jaws" album on TFF for future reference.

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I agree with Nandomus. The first tooth is from a cow and the other is a canid either a coyote or domestic dog and they are recent.

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My response about "weak stylids" was not backed up by anything I presented, so I took some time to photograph some cow teeth in order to illustrate the distinction between cow and bison.

post-42-0-03637500-1328475459_thumb.jpgpost-42-0-47712000-1328475490_thumb.jpg

post-42-0-11153700-1328475569_thumb.jpgpost-42-0-72151800-1328475614_thumb.jpg

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My response about "weak stylids" was not backed up by anything I presented, so I took some time to photograph some cow teeth in order to illustrate the distinction between cow and bison.

post-42-0-03637500-1328475459_thumb.jpgpost-42-0-47712000-1328475490_thumb.jpg

post-42-0-11153700-1328475569_thumb.jpgpost-42-0-72151800-1328475614_thumb.jpg

Harry...

Thanks for stepping in with your expertise and, of course, your wonderful images :)

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These images are in my "Teeth & Jaws" album on TFF for future reference.

Thank you so much for taking the time to share this information! Asking questions and reading how the experts weigh in teaches us so much! I'd done a considerable bit of searching on my own trying to come up with an answer, but nothing appeared nearly as clear and concise as what you've presented!

Anna

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