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Two And A Half Teeth.


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#1 Anna

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 02:38 PM

John found the first two teeth recently in North Sulphur River (Cretaceous) and has asked me to post them here for id. The larger of the two is definintely mineralized--the encrustations on the lingual surfaces are rock hard. The smaller "half" tooth also does not appear to be recent.

The third tooth fragment isn't much to look at, and it may not be identifiable, but I was real shocked to find it--in an area recently excavated here in the Kiamichi formation. (Right across the road from our farm.) I though, if anyone has any ideas, it would be kinda cool to know. Normally we only find Texigryphaea sp. and the occasional ammonite until you get closer to the Goodland Limestone exposures around the lake.

John wants to say "Thanks!"

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Anna and John
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#2 Nandomas

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 02:45 PM

1 bovidae?

2 canidae?

Anyway, they are from the recent upper sediments and not from Creataceous :(

Edited by Nandomas, 03 February 2012 - 02:45 PM.

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#3 Indy

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 02:49 PM

This one reminds me of a "Bison" tooth
bison.JPG
Check out this web page: Link

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#4 Anna

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 03:20 PM

I've been thinking bison on the first one...certainly doesn't match up to the juvenile and adult cow skulls we have here.
Anna and John
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#5 Bill

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 03:30 PM

x2 for Bovidae.

Pleisto' Tooth,   Bos sp. L M3.b.jpg Pleisto' Tooth,   Bos sp. a.jpg
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#6 Indy

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 03:33 PM

Matching loose bison teeth with found jaws...might be interesting,
however, it isn't a process for identification
bison.JPG
See the stylid on the side of the tooth. It appears as a little "donut"
of enamel at mid-tooth. This stylid is a feature that is used to
distinguish loose bison teeth from cow teeth.
Web Page: Link

Edited by Indy, 03 February 2012 - 03:34 PM.

Locality & Geology as well as Time Period is important Information

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#7 kolleamm

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 08:48 PM

Two and a half men, im sorry i had to write it LOL

#8 Al Dente

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 06:29 AM

See the stylid on the side of the tooth. It appears as a little "donut"
of enamel at mid-tooth. This stylid is a feature that is used to
distinguish loose bison teeth from cow teeth.
Web Page: Link


I have heard that both modern cattle and bison had stylids on some lower teeth. Here's link to a photo of a cow jaw:
http://www.istockpho...ow-jaw-bone.php

and here is a different photo:

cow jaw.jpg

#9 Harry Pristis

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 12:41 PM

'Al Dente' is correct . . . cows often do have stylids on their cheek teeth. It is common to see stylids on the deciduous teeth of cows. But, these cow stylids are usually weak and thin-walled when compared to the robust teeth of bison. In fact, the cow stylids often fall away once the cementum of the tooth is gone.

I think the tooth in question here is probably a cow m3 with the weak stylid held in place by the residual cementum. Keep in mind that differentiation of isolated teeth of closely-related species may be more art than science. Compare the tooth with this bison tooth:

bisoncamelm3B.JPG bisoncamelm3.JPG

bisonteethocclusalstylid.JPG

The canid half-tooth is about the right size for a coyote, but domestic dog (or some other dog) is possible. Compare it with these coyote teeth:

canislatransM1occlusalpair.jpg

The third tooth reminds me of a bison or cow P2. Compare it with the P2 in the image above.

These images are in my "Teeth & Jaws" album on TFF for future reference.

http://pristis.wix.c...e-demijohn-page

 

"Thus declined the population of the giant shark, C. megalodon,

with the loss of its preferred prey, skunk apes.
 
"The big sharks were forced to eat whale and dugong and manatee and walrus,

but what they dang-well wanted was ape.

('Once you've had Australopithecine, nothing else tastes quite-so-fine!')

 The megalodons persisted for a while,

but there was no enthusiasm, and they died out also."

 

 


#10 mikeymig

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 12:45 PM

I agree with Nandomus. The first tooth is from a cow and the other is a canid either a coyote or domestic dog and they are recent.

Many times I've wondered how much there is to know.
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#11 Harry Pristis

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 04:02 PM

My response about "weak stylids" was not backed up by anything I presented, so I took some time to photograph some cow teeth in order to illustrate the distinction between cow and bison.

bison_bos_m3.JPG bison_bos_m3_B.JPG

cow_m3.jpg cow_cheekteeth.JPG


http://pristis.wix.c...e-demijohn-page

 

"Thus declined the population of the giant shark, C. megalodon,

with the loss of its preferred prey, skunk apes.
 
"The big sharks were forced to eat whale and dugong and manatee and walrus,

but what they dang-well wanted was ape.

('Once you've had Australopithecine, nothing else tastes quite-so-fine!')

 The megalodons persisted for a while,

but there was no enthusiasm, and they died out also."

 

 


#12 Indy

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 04:11 PM

My response about "weak stylids" was not backed up by anything I presented, so I took some time to photograph some cow teeth in order to illustrate the distinction between cow and bison.

bison_bos_m3.JPG bison_bos_m3_B.JPG

cow_m3.jpg cow_cheekteeth.JPG

Harry...
Thanks for stepping in with your expertise and, of course, your wonderful images :)

Locality & Geology as well as Time Period is important Information

Flash from the Past (Show Us Your Fossils)


#13 Anna

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 08:40 PM

These images are in my "Teeth & Jaws" album on TFF for future reference.


Thank you so much for taking the time to share this information! Asking questions and reading how the experts weigh in teaches us so much! I'd done a considerable bit of searching on my own trying to come up with an answer, but nothing appeared nearly as clear and concise as what you've presented!

Anna
Anna and John
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