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crinus

Today was a sad at this household as I bid farewell to a major portion of the "Ordovician Crinoids from Ontario" shown on my web page as well as many that are not shown there. Dr. Ausich of Ohio State came by to take them away. He and some grad students will be starting work on a series of papers on "The Ordovician Crinoids of Ontario." Many of the specimens will probably be used in the publications and therefore will not be coming back.

I suspect that a number of new genera and species will be created as a result of their work. The preliminary work will focus on identifying many of the specimens whose ID's have been tentative or completely unknown. They will then be back for more specimens of the newly created genera/species as well as specimens of known established taxa. By the time everything is completed, I suspect I will be left with one specimen of each species. Even those will end up with the other specimens as I have agreed that all specimens be deposited at one institution.

I am not complaining as I had always hoped that someone would be interested in working on the Ordovician fossils of Ontario. I really wanted to see something in print before I went to the collecting grounds on the other side. Now I see a light at the end of the tunnel (not the one that I will eventually go into).

So this is what it is like to have your kids go off to college, never to return.

Now I have cabinets with many empty drawers. Time to stop complaining and start filling them up. Not two month ago I was wondering what to do as I had run out of drawer space. I was actually thinking of building more cabinets. Not anymore.

crinus

Edited by crinus

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Auspex

This is bitter-sweet news...

You should feel proud for having assembled such a fine collection, and for having secured their future. Well done.

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Fossildude19

Crinus,

Indeed, bittersweet news.

But I for one am thankful that you are leading by example, and what a wonderful way to do so - by providing research specimens to Ohio State!

And, you do have some room to fill up, again. :)

Thanks for all of your contributions to science, and this Forum.

Regards,

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FossilDAWG

Crinus,

I'm sure it's very bittersweet for you, and I'd like to commend you on your generosity. I hope you can take comfort in knowing that all your effort will now have achieved a sort of immortality, as your specimens will be treasured and protected forever.

I'm just a little sad that there were no Canadian researchers available to work on these Canadian fossils. Perhaps that's a statement on the state of paleontological research in Canada these days. I don't know of anyone who is actively researching echinoderm fossils in Canada. Quite a while ago Jim Eckert published a lot on Silurian crinoids while he was doing his PhD with Carlton Brett, but I haven't seen anything from him in many years.

Don

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crinus

Crinus,

I'm sure it's very bittersweet for you, and I'd like to commend you on your generosity. I hope you can take comfort in knowing that all your effort will now have achieved a sort of immortality, as your specimens will be treasured and protected forever.

I'm just a little sad that there were no Canadian researchers available to work on these Canadian fossils. Perhaps that's a statement on the state of paleontological research in Canada these days. I don't know of anyone who is actively researching echinoderm fossils in Canada. Quite a while ago Jim Eckert published a lot on Silurian crinoids while he was doing his PhD with Carlton Brett, but I haven't seen anything from him in many years.

Don

I had approached the ROM many years ago but they just brushed me off. As you say, there just was no one interested. I had actually given up on anyone taking an interest in it. I had many emails between Jim Brower and myself but that never went anywhere. He did say that I had many new specimens but he had no time for them. Two other crinoid researcher looked but never said a word. About three years ago I sent Dr. Ausich a CD with a pic of every single crinoid I had from the Brechin quarries. At that time it was 300+ pics. He did respond about how he was drooling over the many pics. He said that he was busy but interested. That was three years ago and I had given up on him also. Then sometime this past November he sent me an email that he retired from teaching and was ready to dedicated some time to my stuff. He even said he had two grad students interested. He expects several papers to come out of this. Yes it is VERY bitttersweet, but I am excited. My life's works will actually be used in several publication. Can't wait. I could not ask for anyone better that Dr.Ausich to work on them. He is the leading authority on fossils crinoids.

In the next couple of months I plan to add many more pics to my web page of the stuff that is gone or soon will be gone. The institution that will be receiving them is a stickler about anyone using photos of "their" specimen. I need to post them before they officially become "their" specimens. I don't believe they can do anything about it if I post the stuff before it is officially deposited. Nothing will be sent to the institution until all the research is done but I suspect that as soon as acquisitions numbers are assigned to the specimen they officially become "theirs".

Thank you all for you comments.

crinus

Edited by crinus

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collector

What a wonderful collection and you must be be proud that it is so good that people are taking it away to study. Your website is really special. I am new to the field and I know that it will be helpful with identifications. I have a feeling that your cabinets will be filling up again quickly.

Patti

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crinus

Today I added another section of crinoids to my web pages. The new section is "Crinoids from Michigan". I friend of mine (now in her 80's) decided to start disposing of her collection. She asked me to help and as a bonus I got first crack at all of the fossils. She had what I would consider the best collection of crinoids and trilobites from the Alpena area of Michigan. Fortunately I was able to purchase most the crinoids and all of the trilobites. I have put some of the best stuff on my web page. I hope you enjoy. Trilobites from Alpena will come later.

Those empty drawers are filling up quickly. I also acquired a large collection of Anna, Illinois crinoids that she collected in the 1960's. I lot of odds and ends echinoderms were also acquired and I hope to add to my web page as time permits.

crinus

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Foozil

That's a really nice collection, congratulations on the website btw. How did you make it?

Me, and my friends, could only dream of a collection like that!

Edited by Dinoboy123

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ZiggieCie

Crinus, thank you for all of your work and research, and the new home for your babies.

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jpc

Bittersweet indeed. Crinus, you get a big gold star on your forehead AND extra Jello. Yes, that is how I reward my volunteeers, and rarely has anyone ever earned both the star AND the jello at once.

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crinus

Thanks dinoboy for the comments. It took a long time to acquire a collection like this. With hard work and perseverance you can get there also. As for how I made my web page, it is just plain simple HTML. I used no software package. I went on line and took a couple of HTML tutorials and within a couple of hours you are writing HTML. Nothing fancy. Just the basics. Anyone can do it.

crinus

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Plantguy

Dang Crinus, I thought for sure I've seen your website previously thru another thread and somehow I missed this thread. Beautiful material and you've got plants and Solnhofen material stuff too!! Excellent!

Regards, Chris

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jpc

Following in dinoboy's line of questions... How did you get the URL for your web site? I will echo what crimes said about HTML... I used to have my own website. Did it all in HTML after only about six one hour online tutorials.

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crinus

jpc

Getting the URL was easy. I just decided on a hosting company and they did all the work for a $10 fee. I chose a name and if taken, they let you know. crinus.com was taken for the most ridicules web site you can imagine. Chinese Restaurants IN the United States. crinus.info and crinus.net was available so I decided on info as it was only going to be an information site.

Thanks Plantguy.

crinus

Edited by crinus

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crinus

Four years ago I posted here that a portion of my Brechin crinoid collection was leaving to be worked on at Ohio State.  Today the first of several manuscripts was digitally issued. (Paper to follow later).  Here is the link  https://www.researchgate.net/publication/323320121_An_echinoderm_Lagerstatte_from_the_Upper_Ordovician_Katian_Ontario_taxonomic_re-evaluation_and_description_of_new_dicyclic_camerate_crinoids

 

I don't think I am allowed to post the actual paper here.  Members of the Paleontological Society can access the manuscripts.

 

This first paper covers Reteocrinus, Archaeocrinus, Cleiocrinus and a new genus called Priscillacrinus.  This first paper also declares the Brechin fauna a Konservat-Lagerstatte.

There were no changes to Reteocrinus other than a redescription because of the excellent preservation of the Brechin crinoids.  Cleiocrinus had a new species added on (lepidotus) in addition to the more common regius species.  Two new species of Archaeocrinus are described.  sundayae (named for my wife) and maraensis (named for the township the quarries reside in).  And finally a new genus (Priscillacrinus elegans) is described. This is a very rare crinoid. I had only four specimen and naturally they took be best one for the study. 

 

I have updated my web page to reflect these changes.  The next manuscript should be coming soon and will cover the disparids and hybocrinoids from the Brechin area.

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Kane

Thanks for keeping us in the loop, Joe, and congratulations on your hard-earned Brechin finds being featured into academic print. :dinothumb: Well deserved, and you definitely have put in your innings there.

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Ludwigia

Congratulations, Joe! Interesting to hear that Brechin is classified as a Konservat-Lagerstätte.

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FossilDAWG

Congratulations!  I am thrilled that this fauna is getting the attention it so deserves after a lapse of around 100 years.  Thanks for your irreplaceable role in all of this.  :dinothumb:

 

Don

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Tidgy's Dad

Congratulations! :)

An amazing thing it is that you have done. 

Respect. 

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FossilDAWG

Just downloaded the paper.  I'll have to look over some of my Ontario material to see if any belongs to any of the new species.  I have one crinoid from near Ottawa that I had IDed as Cotylacrinna but I'll have to see if Priscillacrinus is a better fit.  Excellent that you are a coauthor, though of course almost none of the paper would have been possible without your contribution.

 

Don

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jpc

Excellent!  And nice to see you here again...

 

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piranha
1 hour ago, FossilDAWG said:

...Excellent that you are a coauthor, though of course almost none of the paper would have been possible without your contribution.

 

Quote

"Material is predominately from the collection of J.M. Koniecki."

 

Big Congrats! :fistbump:

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crinus

Just out. Paper #2 on the Brechin crinoids.

 

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-paleontology/article/disparid-and-hybocrinid-crinoids-echinodermata-from-the-upper-ordovician-lower-katian-brechin-lagerstatte-of-ontario/A5275FF549B66CA6B13614DFE897464E

 

One new crinoid,  Anomalocrinus astrictus

Several reassignment to other species from what I/we have been calling them.

Most important part is that on Eustenocrinus.  Previously, one poor specimen was known.  Complete redescription based on 3 new specimens.

 

I have updated my web page to reflect the new names. 

Joe

 

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Plantguy

Still stunned by looking at your amazing finds on the website. Congrats on the new species and its publication. Regards, Chris 

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