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Flint Hills

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Has anyone else collected from the Flint Hills of Kansas? I get to the area west of Topeka

about 4 or 5 times a year. I've found cinoids (some large), brachiopods, bryzoans, even

small trilobites. This summer I found 3 cephalopods and a piece of shark fin.

What else have people found here?... the area seems very rich in fossils.

I can post some pictures.

Cheers,

Rich

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Auspex

I've never been there, but I'd love to see your finds! :)

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kauffy

Never hunted there but sounds wicked!

i would love to see some pictures, i hunt permian exposures here in Australia so it would be interesting to see some of your specimins!

Cheers

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Xiphactinus

Hey Rich!

I've pulled some permian amphibian remains (articulated!) out of the roadcut just west of Eskridge....north side of the road, near the big tower. It's in a gray/red mudstone. Lots of pounding, prying and splitting, but they are there.

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st41lion

Hi, am from leavenworth Kansas and I would love to take my children to the area you are speaking of near Topeka where you found trilobites. Would you mind sharing some info on where to find this place. Thanks,John

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st41lion

Rich, I went to Eskridge and pounded rock for 3 hours. I guess I was not lucky enough to find anything or I was just looking in the wrong spot or going at it all wrong. I observed the crinoids and normal marine fossils on the rock, but found no amphibians by simply smashing the hard semi chalky rock. Were the ones you found exposed and you chipped them out or did you just smashrocks in half till you found them? Also much of the rock seemed very pourus. I took pics and will post soon to see if i was in the right location. There was a large radio tower or something above the roadcut on the North side.

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Drlazer

First, low quality fossils, but attractive matrix. You can pick up limestone with flint nodules at exit 313 on I-70. Going to the north towards Manhattan just 1/10 mile or more is quite convenient on the west side of 177. The flint and lime stone have numerous small Pennsylvanian fossils and mini-caves carved through the limestone. 10-20 lbs pieces are easy to pick up.

https://maps.google....,262.86,,0,4.92

Edited by Drlazer

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Drlazer

Stagg Hill Location

Permian age marine fossils include crinoids, bryazoa, brachiopods (chonetes, jerusinia/dictyoclostus, spirifers, meekela, lysochonetes, wellerwellia, composita), fusilinidae, straparalous (gastropod), trilobite -- usually small pygidia. And a large ammonite (tainoceras), higher up the formation.

The Hughes shale is the dominant layer. There is also a thin layer of calcareous shale that makes nice plates of dense fossils, though a bit battered as though they washed around a bit in the shallows.

This is a nice road cut that is fairly long so should be very productive off K18 on the west side of Manhattan, KS. A railroad track runs down the other side or Rosencutter Rd.

https://maps.google....=12,299.18,,0,0

Edited by Drlazer

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Drlazer

Tuttle Creek Recreation Area

An old quarry where the Permian age Hughes shale was scraped off the underlying limestone and deposited close by yields many chonetes and a smaller number of small trilobites (usually just pygidia). I haven't been to the site in a few decades, however, so conditions may have changed.

Park on east side, and then walk to roughly center of picture.

https://maps.google....m.panoramio.all

Edited by Drlazer

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Drlazer

I'm correcting any posts where I called the flint hills "Pennsylvanian" in age; it is "permian". Here's a quote about the fossils found in the Hughes shale:

"The Hughes Creek shale is a well-defined faunal and lithologic unit within the limits of Riley County, where exposures are confined to a relatively small area in and near Manhattan and along the hills west of Deep Creek in northeastern Riley County. The smaller lithologic units vary somewhat in thickness, and a fusulinid-bearing limestone near the top grades laterally into yellow shale crowded with fusulinid tests. At the base are many small fusulinids and Crurithyris sp. in shale just above the Americus limestone. About 12 or 15 feet higher are thin limestones containing Neospirifer dunbari,Meekopora prosseri, Orbiculoidea missouriensis, and Lingula carbonaria. Near the top in yellow limestone or yellow shale are many fusulinids, mostly Triticites ventricosus. Just below the top there are small geodes and veins of calcite in yellow and gray shale at some places." (retrieved 11/23/2012 from http://www.kgs.ku.ed...y/strat03b.html)

I have collected the small shelled Orbiculoidea missouriensis from the black shale in the area below K hill, especially the cut behind the aquarium. It stands out clearly as it is whitish-orange on the black shale.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=k-hill,+manhattan,+ks&hl=en&ll=39.172588,-96.55122&spn=0.003335,0.005284&sll=37.6,-95.665&sspn=39.135455,86.572266&t=h&hnear=K+Ln,+Manhattan,+Riley,+Kansas+66502&z=18

Edited by Drlazer

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