Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
franks66

Tooth Id Bison? Or Cow?

Recommended Posts

franks66

This is a surface find, found laying on top of a small gravel deposit in a creek. The location is in Northwest Ohio in the till plains region very near the border of what was the Great Black Swamp. @ 6 miles north east of Tiffin. The creek forms a small ravine starting at the top of a wooded ground Moraine and emptying into a larger creek in the valley between other Moraines. This site is @ 1-2 km from the Sandusky River. The level of the creek was low, exposing many gravel deposits. The height of the moraine compared to the valley below is @ 100 feet, It was found near the bottom.

From several hours of research on the internet, the closest to an ID I can get is that it is either a cow or Bison tooth. I believe that it has at least partially fossilized, but I could be wrong about that. What points me in the fossilized direction is the inner "pulp tissue?" that can be seen protruding from the fracture on the root end. It is smoothed and hard like rock, in fact before I cleaned it I had thought they were small pebbles wedged inside, but whatever it is it is part of the inner tooth.

Due to the stylid on the side of the tooth, it makes me think this is a bison tooth, but I've also come across pics that seem to show cows having this same feature. The stylid appears to have had a small amount broken off near the cap, but not recently as it has a similar patina to the rest. All loose material has been cleaned away, and whatever is seen is physically attached to the specimen. The surviving fragment is @ 1-3/4" long and @ 1" wide. Sorry I know Metric is the preferred scale, but I can't find a suitable ruler at the moment.

It being a cows tooth would seem to be the logical choice if this is not a fossil as this area was part of a working farm from @1830 to modern times. However, Bison had been reported in Ohio until the early 1800's so either would not be out of the realm of possibilities. If its age falls before non indigenous habitation, then I would probably lean towards bison.

I appreciate any info, even if I am completely out in left field on this one.

post-0-0-32554300-1329671237_thumb.jpg

post-0-0-17594900-1329671253_thumb.jpg

post-0-0-83869400-1329671270_thumb.jpg

post-0-0-93164200-1329671286_thumb.jpg

post-0-0-83041700-1329671300_thumb.jpg

post-0-0-49741100-1329671315_thumb.jpg

post-0-0-14992700-1329671328_thumb.jpg

post-0-0-78190400-1329671340_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Indy

The tooth does appear to have a "Stylid" but read on another

post that a stylid" can appear on some immature cow teeth. However,

this one looks (to me) as a more mature tooth

post-6417-0-14943300-1329674190_thumb.jpg

Edited by Indy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
franks66

Would having a "stylid" rule out it being a cow? I'm hooked either way. Is there any way to tell if it is fossilized, as opposed to a cow tooth that has been in the ground for 50-200 years? I have limited experience with actual known fossils. Years ago, I did a day trip to a quarry in Coastal North Carolina and pulled a handful of teeth from aquatic life, and they had the same feel as the inner part of this tooth I described. I realize there is only so much you can tell from photos. I'm planning on heading back to where I found this tooth and do a little more scouting, but since it probably washed down, its probably a shot in the dark. The area I found it does not seem like a likely spot for livestock to have been buried due to the terrain, and is not an area conducive to grazing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill

See this topic re-cow/bison stylids.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
franks66

Thank you for the link. I'm glad I'm not the only one having trouble differentiating the two. Since I'm not trying to sell it or put it in a museum, I think I'll call it a Bison tooth, although common sense tells me that there is a much higher probability of it being from a cow. I really like this site, and think I may have just found my new hobby. I'm going to try to get out later this week to the same spot as I want to do some gold panning for some Glacial drop placer gold. Maybe I will find some more specimens to go with it and with any luck a little color to boot. I can tell I have alot of studying to do as far as geology, and especially the terminology. Luckily I think I have found the right place, and the right people to help me out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Indy

I'm glad I'm not the only one having trouble differentiating the two.

Since I'm not trying to sell it or put it in a museum, I think I'll call it a Bison tooth...........

Nice thing about this hobby...Its our collection and we do some research and then

label fossils based on available information. Sometimes its a toss-up. We all then

choose what ID we wish to use. Congrats on finding a "Bison tooth" :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PrehistoricFlorida

Stylids appear on both cow and bison teeth, regardless of the age of the animal. The presence of a stylid is often used to differentiate between camel/llama and cow/bison. The tooth in question here is likely a cow tooth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PleistoGuy

Agree with prehistoric Florida, it's more likely to be a bos tooth.

Besides, it's not completely fossilized, seems to be just preserved.

Edited by PleistoGuy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
donbrunning

I've heard the term "stylid" also referred to as a "stolen".  Are they the same or am I mistaken?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×