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jpbowden

Texas Amber?

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jpbowden

While out in West Texas, had to be in the 60's, I was running the back roads and came across a wooden bridge along side of a wooden railroad bridge, along this draw, I found coal, agate, amber and a lot of fossil wood. I gave this stuff to Mr. King who had a Rock Shop in the North Side of Houston, he had a daughter

that had one blue eye and one brown eye (just so someone might know them). But the question is do or have anyone of you ever been to this place, most of the amber was dull to say the least, but some when cut looked like carnelian. Just wanted to know if anyone else had been there. The area was mostly salt flats and rock.

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MikeD
While out in West Texas, had to be in the 60's, I was running the back roads and came across a wooden bridge along side of a wooden railroad bridge, along this draw, I found coal, agate, amber and a lot of fossil wood. I gave this stuff to Mr. King who had a Rock Shop in the North Side of Houston, he had a daughter

that had one blue eye and one brown eye (just so someone might know them). But the question is do or have anyone of you ever been to this place, most of the amber was dull to say the least, but some when cut looked like carnelian. Just wanted to know if anyone else had been there. The area was mostly salt flats and rock.

There is a King's Gem Center on FM 1960 on the north side. I haven't been there yet. I've heard of it before, but keep forgetting to go check it out sometime.

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jpbowden

I have property in New Mexico and when I would come to Houston Mr. King would buy everything I had, fossils, agate, moonstone, jasper, thundereggs, well you just name it. Heard he died about 25 years a go but that was from another fellow I ran into, I haven't been back to Houston in maybe 30 years. I heard the place has grown some.

Maybe sometime we can make a run to New Mexico and see whats out there.

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MikeD
I have property in New Mexico and when I would come to Houston Mr. King would buy everything I had, fossils, agate, moonstone, jasper, thundereggs, well you just name it. Heard he died about 25 years a go but that was from another fellow I ran into, I haven't been back to Houston in maybe 30 years. I heard the place has grown some.

Maybe sometime we can make a run to New Mexico and see whats out there.

30 years. Grown a little (times 1000). I've been here 28 years and I don't even recognize where I am sometimes when I go to a part of town I haven't been in for a while.

New Mexico would be really cool, but unfortunately I still have to work for a living for a few more years. Maybe someday.

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jkfoam

I remember a King's Rock Shop in Houston out at a shopping center at Tidwell Rd and I-45 (On the Houston North side) back in the late 70's. I lived in Conroe, Tx at the time and I don't know what happened to it after I left.

Also, I collected amber in a creek out in the Big Bend area just North of Needle Peak near an old abandoned mercury mine/smelter. The amber was very small pieces and I would not have known it was amber without my geologist friend who was with me. The pieces were so small that they were only suitable as micro specimens. I think they got lost in the agate I was collecting. This was many years ago.

JKFoam

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Mike Murphy

I collected numerous small pieces of Cretaceous amber in the early 1980's from a large exposure of the upper Aguja Formation near Terlingua. The location was near a dinosaur collecting locality operated by Wann Langston and the University of Texas. In this area, the upper Aguja Formation consisted of dark gray carbonaceous mudstone (shale) and sandstone. Along with the amber, there was carbonized wood and thin beds of lignite. The amber was small and fractured. The quality was poor, ranging from opaque to translucent and easily fragmented. I also found a number of bone fragments that were identified as ceratopsian frill pieces and rib sections along with several turtle scutes. The location that you mentioned sounded like it could have been an exposure of the same formation, but it might also have been the Javelina Formation. There is no agate from the upper Aguja that I am aware of, but it is present in the nearby volcanic rocks.

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tracer

That area and those formations are very cool. So visually entertaining that I don't have to find anything to be happy there. Taking pictures of the formations alone is fun. Eye candy. The cretaceous mixed in with Eocene igneous. Some places are so littered with calcite that they sparkle in the sun and look like they're covered in broken glass. And then have a beer on the porch of the store in Terlingua and listen to the local characters play their guitars and hold court. Good times.

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Mike Murphy

The Big Bend area is a unique area with scenery that you can't find elsewhere and where you find people with unusual humor and philosophies. I have always loved travelling in the Big Bend area and have spent considerable time over the years in Terlingua, Study Butte, Lajitas and Hot Springs Village. Studying the complex geology of the area, collecting fossils and drinking beer have always been favorite pastimes, and the Big Bend area has to be the best place to do all of these. Among my favorite activities in this area has been to drink Lone Star Beer and cool off at La Kiva in Terlingua, admiring the world's only specimen of Penisaurus; drinking Lone Star Beer with Clay Henry, the beer drinking goat mayor of Lajitas (actually now Clay Henry III) at the Trading Post in Lajitas; and soaking up the hot water at night drinking Lone Star Beer at the hot springs in Hot Springs Village. Did I mention that I like Lone Star Beer?

Mike

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jpbowden

I would give anything to drink a beer, one glorious mother loving beer. I now have a tear in my eye, thanks a lot. :D

Jkfoam, that's the Kings I was talking abut, great place and always friendly.

As far as the amber it was up north near the New Mexican border. Lots of wood there and all of it good agate too. I wish I could find my old road maps used to mark it on them.

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jpbowden
I collected numerous small pieces of Cretaceous amber in the early 1980's from a large exposure of the upper Aguja Formation near Terlingua. The location was near a dinosaur collecting locality operated by Wann Langston and the University of Texas. In this area, the upper Aguja Formation consisted of dark gray carbonaceous mudstone (shale) and sandstone. Along with the amber, there was carbonized wood and thin beds of lignite. The amber was small and fractured. The quality was poor, ranging from opaque to translucent and easily fragmented. I also found a number of bone fragments that were identified as ceratopsian frill pieces and rib sections along with several turtle scutes. The location that you mentioned sounded like it could have been an exposure of the same formation, but it might also have been the Javelina Formation. There is no agate from the upper Aguja that I am aware of, but it is present in the nearby volcanic rocks.

Sorry about that, the wood was agate, sort of like the stuff you get in parts of Colorado, honey colored.

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Chanco

Shoot, I’ll go with you to New Mexico to hunt. I retired from the teams in Navy Special Operations Command then recently retired again from a government agency and all I wanna do is hunt for fossils. 

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