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GerryK

Missouri Trilobites

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GerryK    121
GerryK

The last two.

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piranha    2,088
piranha

Congrats on the Trilobite Treasure Trove!2722.gif 2722.gif 2722.gif :fistbump:

I'm curious about the stratigraphic context on the Prosocephalus. How does the latest Pridolian square with Campbell's Emsian age for the Oklahoma examples?

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GerryK    121
GerryK

Congrats on the Trilobite Treasure Trove!2722.gif 2722.gif 2722.gif :fistbump:

I'm curious about the stratigraphic context on the Prosocephalus. How does the latest Pridolian square with Campbell's Emsian age for the Oklahoma examples?

Prosocephalus tridentifera and Prosocephalus palacea are found together in the lower Bailey. This gets back to my #99 post about where the Silurian/Devonian boundary is in Missouri. Some authors have it in the Bailey but there is no Golden Spike. Prosocephalus xylabion is in the Bois d'Arc (Fittstown Member) Gedinnian age (not Emsian) Campbell (1977).

As to how the age of the Missouri trilobites correlate with the Oklahoma trilobites is unknown at this time. Looking at Prosocephalus tridentifera and Prosocephalus xylabion and how similar they are, one would think they are very close in age.

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piranha    2,088
piranha

Thanks for clarifying that, at least the latest Silurian is not as difficult to reconcile with the base of the Devonian.

These incredible calymenids and dalmanitids are certainly a great opportunity for an important new paper! emo73.gif:P

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GerryK    121
GerryK

After MAPS I spent a week collecting and found a couple of new arthropods from Missouri.

post-7992-0-37135100-1398524760_thumb.jpgpost-7992-0-48409900-1398524780_thumb.jpg

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ashcraft    76
ashcraft

Living fossils. I get a few brought in to school every year. They are relics from a much dryer time in Missouri history, still surviving on dry rocky outcrops. Their oasis in the middle of inhospitable conditions. (forests). Keep your eyes open in such areas, and you might even see tarantulas.

fkaa

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GerryK    121
GerryK

Living fossils. I get a few brought in to school every year. They are relics from a much dryer time in Missouri history, still surviving on dry rocky outcrops. Their oasis in the middle of inhospitable conditions. (forests). Keep your eyes open in such areas, and you might even see tarantulas.

fkaa

In all the years collecting in Missouri, I've never seen any scorpions. Then I find two on the same day (a dry rocky outcrop). Now you say there are tarantulas. emo37.gif

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ashcraft    76
ashcraft

I have had two brought in to school in the past 7 years. One was quite large, nearly hand sized. My biggest concern are copperheads, flipped over a number of rocks to find them giving me the stink-eye. We had a local guy have one in his tent this last summer, he "tried to do the right thing" and shoo it out. He got a severe bite, which he eventually died from. Second confirmed fatality (ever) of a copperhead bite in Missouri that I am aware of.

fkaa

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mikeymig    73
mikeymig

Gerry, Thank you for including us on your "Missouri Trilobite Saga". I have learned a lot reading your post and your passion is obvious and appreciated. I can see a life time or more of work that needs to be done in this area of the US. If you need help digging the next time you go please don't hesitate to ask me. You know about my field experience and two diggers are better then one. Keep us updated on your discoveries and post more photos soon!

mikey

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GerryK    121
GerryK

When I started this topic over 2 years ago, I stated that one of the trilobites I hoped would be a mind blower. It's time to post the trilobite, a Ceraurus from Missouri with soft parts preserved. One of the enlarged pictures shows both antenna and another shows the legs. This trilobite puts Missouri as another site where soft body parts of trilobites are preserved. I'm posting the trilobite here first for those who follow this topic. I will repost this amazing trilobite later under its own topic.

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ashcraft    76
ashcraft

Congratulations, quite a find.

Sigh, says the poor boy in the man's body who can't even find one whole trilobite.

Fkaa

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