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Id Help Need For Pensylvanian Age Concretion Fossils From Oklahoma


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#1 PetrolPete

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 10:26 PM

I found a number of concretions from the oolagah lime formation (Pennsylvanian age) and I've been popping them over the last month. I've managed to ID some of them (I think) but there are several othere I need help with.

Pyritized orbiculoidea (I think)

IMG_0450.jpg

A soft bodied organism of some sort? (for scale it is slightly larger than a quarter, my scale pic was too large to load)
IMG_0443.jpg

Another orbiculoidea? or another bivalve of somesort?
IMG_0479.JPG

more pics to come

#2 PetrolPete

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 10:32 PM

Here are some more

No idea what this might be, there is another piece to it that I'm still trying to split
IMG_0472.jpg

also have no idea what this one might be, if anything (a little larger than a quarter, scale/complete concretion pic was too large)
IMG_0470.jpg

possibly a bivalve or soft-bodied organism?
IMG_0488.jpg

more to come

#3 PetrolPete

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 10:36 PM

another soft bodied creature or bivalve?
IMG_0465.jpg

no idea, a pyritized something
IMG_0447.jpg

soft-bodied creature of some sort?
IMG_0453.jpg

another Orbiculoidea?
IMG_0482.jpg

#4 Auspex

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 07:32 AM

My old eyes are having a tough time seeing any details, because the photos are so dark. :(

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#5 JimB88

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 07:34 AM

The orbi is neat! Keep in mind that concretions can form around even tiny fragments. I think the 'soft bodied animals' in this case are just the first part of the concretion to form. Also keep in mind that soft bodied preservation is extremely rare! This is what makes the Mazon / Braidwood / Essex site so special! Icollect ironstone nodules here in TN, but all I find are orbi's and other brachs.

#6 BobWill

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 10:52 AM

The ones with concentric circles look they're from shark verts.

#7 Rockin' Ric

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 12:15 PM

I think you are right when you say the top picture is a orbiculodea. Here is are some found in Alabama.

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#8 PetrolPete

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 06:43 PM

My old eyes are having a tough time seeing any details, because the photos are so dark. :(

sorry, it is hard to get good pictures of these guys because they are pitch black themselves and too much light quickly drowns out the photo

#9 Wrangellian

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 12:07 AM

Just found this thread... trying to tease out some of the detail from your photos (maybe could be more successful if you did overexpose your photos at least a bit):
IMG_0465 ed.jpg IMG_0482 ed.jpg
I'd say at least one of them could be Orbiculoidea

#10 Indy

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 01:14 AM

I think you are right when you say the top picture is a orbiculodea. Here is are some found in Alabama.

i agree ... The inarticulate brachiopod Orbiculoidea
4 from Missouri for comparison on this page - Click Here

Locality & Geology as well as Time Period is important Information

Flash from the Past (Show Us Your Fossils)


#11 Herb

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 01:14 PM

i agree ... The inarticulate brachiopod Orbiculoidea
4 from Missouri for comparison on this page - Click Here

Ditto, all I can see for sure are brachiopods.

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#12 FossilDAWG

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 08:13 AM

Try taking the photos with a darker background. The light background is likely fooling the light sensor into setting an incorrect exposure. Also, often it is possible to angle the light to bring out surface detail; direct light straight onto the subject makes everything look flat and washed out.

Don



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