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redleaf101

The Last Billion Years: A Geological History Of The Maritime Provinces...

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redleaf101

This has to be the book that opened the door to understanding the geology of home. The Last Billion Years is a 200+ pages put together by the Atlantic Geological Society (AGS) to detail every nuts and bolts of what was going on from the formation of Pangaea to its eventual splitting.

I've read that book from front to cover and I keep going back to it for reference. The information for localities and the maps are very well layed out. The chapters of the book are seperated by Period. It goes back and forth all over the Maritimes but doesn't leave you dazed or confused. HA! Every geo topic is covered, from the fossils found, the mining industry, the processes that created wonders like the Bay of Fundy's tides, and so much more. Its a fairly sized book, but i still carry it around with me in my backpack.

9781551093512.jpg

Lots of visuals, lots of maps, simply lots of cool information about rocks! This book can be found on nimbus publishing's website, amazon, and chapters/indigo.

Cheers!

Keenan

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Fossildude19

Thanks Keenan -

Will pick it up soon.

Regards,

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siteseer

I've leafed through the copy in the USGS library in Menlo Park, California. It looked like a good reference. I liked the short section on sharks.

This has to be the book that opened the door to understanding the geology of home. The Last Billion Years is a 200+ pages put together by the Atlantic Geological Society (AGS) to detail every nuts and bolts of what was going on from the formation of Pangaea to its eventual splitting.

I've read that book from front to cover and I keep going back to it for reference. The information for localities and the maps are very well layed out. The chapters of the book are seperated by Period. It goes back and forth all over the Maritimes but doesn't leave you dazed or confused. HA! Every geo topic is covered, from the fossils found, the mining industry, the processes that created wonders like the Bay of Fundy's tides, and so much more. Its a fairly sized book, but i still carry it around with me in my backpack.

9781551093512.jpg

Lots of visuals, lots of maps, simply lots of cool information about rocks! This book can be found on nimbus publishing's website, amazon, and chapters/indigo.

Cheers!

Keenan

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redleaf101

I like the shark references too. I jutted the information down from the book on the various localities where I could find and plan to check them either late Spring or early Summer. Campbelton, Atholville, Dalhousie (all in northern New Brunswick), and across the pond at Miguasha Quebec. Those localities have yielded some of the rarest sharks ever sought after, some found recently by Dr. Randy Miller from Saint John, NB.

This past Summer before heading out to Cape Breton on a fossil hunt with my buddy Matt Stimson, we stopped to see our friend Dr. Tim Fedak at Wassons Bluff where he was sifting through loose sediment for bones. We ended up finding a shark tooth, lacerated, and teal in color.

One of my favorite section of the book is about the city of Halifax (Nova Scotia), which sits on top of a pluton. Me and Matt have gone urban rockhunting in town and you can't imagine the stuff that comes out (especially when construction companies dynamite the granite). Tourmaline, Smokey Quartz, Gold, oh my! =P

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