redleaf101

Horton's Bluff (Blue Beach, Hantsport), And A Short Stop To Joggins - Part 3

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Continued from Part 2

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Lycopsid tree with bark (top of tree)

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One of many eagles we sighted flying over us. The high winds will sometimes push small rodents off the cliffs and result in their untimely deaths. This proves easy pickings for those winged predators. We had a guardian dog at Blue Beach, might as well have some guardian Eagles at Joggins. Those were incredibly BIG birds, over a meter in width easily.

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Hardscrabble Point (with Brian in the foreground)

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One of many trees exposed in the cliffs

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View from the car on our way back

By the time we chit chatted with Brian a bit and the time he took off, it was close to 8pm. We stopped at a local restaurant to grab a bite to eat and chit chat with friends. We stayed a bit, enough time for me to enjoy some cinnamon goodness. Oooooh sooo good!! Matt had given Don Reid a call but he wasn't there. We stopped at Gloria's house, Don's daughter, and his car was there. We had a great time at their house. I love coming to Joggins where you'll find some of the friendliest people. Great hospitality!

By the time we said our goodbyes, it was close to 11pm and it had started to snow. We took the road and let me say that, visibility was snarge. If it weren't for the wind, visibility would have been just fine, but it was like a blizzard. Good thing my car was still winterized, but there was nothing to worry about for the road were in good condition. Driving on country road was nerve wracking, but the highway proved a bit easier. Still, I didn't dare driving more than 80km/hr as sometimes I had to use the lines on the road as guides. As soon as we hit Moncton, it stopped snowing.

All and all, this was an excellent trip. Tired, but oh so very freakin well worth it. I was extremely happy to get this type of road trip done this early in the season. I can't wait for other treks in the following weeks, where weather will even be more favorable. We've done a short list of sites we need to check as soon as possible, so we'll have that to keep us very busy for the next little while.

I'll be adding a few more posts, so I'll be getting back in the groove.

Till then, cheers!

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Keepin eye out for your future posts, thanks for sharing with all of us!

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A great report on a phenomenal place! Well done!

FYI, the wingspan of a Bald Eagle averages 2 meters (178-229 cm).

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That would make it a juvenile, as there were 3 flying around these parts, 2 of the same size, and the third almost double its size. =P

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That would make it a juvenile, as there were 3 flying around these parts, 2 of the same size, and the third almost double its size. =P

Well, it doesn't work like that...

Once a bird can fly, it is as big as it will ever be (in fact, some of the raptors have slightly longer flight feathers in their hatch-year juvenile plumage; we think of that a 'training wheels').

The bird pictured is a full adult (in at least its 4th full year).

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Nice!

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