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Mazon Creek - Jellyfish

essex jellyfish

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#1 evannorton

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 03:46 PM

Hi Folks-

I've always thought this was a jellyfish from a Essex location.

Folks agree?

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  • jellyfish.JPG


#2 Wrangellian

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 06:27 PM

I'm not sure but it's very interesting. It shares the kind of cracked white surface that a holothurians from that location have but it is much fatter. I'll be watching this one to see what others have to say!

#3 araucaria1959

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 06:27 PM

I'm not sure about jellyfish. Jellyfish, like the common Essexella, is preserved usually much more delicately. Perhaps a coprolite?

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#4 RCFossils

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 06:54 PM

I am not seeing anything that would indicate a jellyfish. Probably just mineralization.

#5 evannorton

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 08:49 PM

The fossil has a very unusual u shaped component on the positive side - at the very top. This shape makes me believe it is not mineralization. Perhaps it could be a sea cucumber....take another look and see if you still feel the same way. Thanks for looking!

#6 araucaria1959

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:22 PM

It is not possible for us to decide from these pics whether this is a sea cucumber or not; this would need an enormous magnification. If it is a sea cucumber, you can see "sigmoidal hooks":

http://i740.photobuc...ek/IMG00709.jpg

I once had a specimen myself which had been labelled (by the seller) "sea cucumber" (Achistrum). After I looked at it (with 20 x magnification) and didn't find the hooks, it became evident that it was not a sea cucumber.

araucaria1959

Edited by araucaria1959, 28 January 2013 - 02:22 PM.


#7 Govinn

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 03:12 PM

Hmmm... I'm no expert, but what I think you have there is a juvenile sasquatch footprint ;)

No, really, I don't know. 99.9% of my collection is vertebrates, so I can't add anything but a little laughter, however, it's VERY interesting to see this because I would have never thought a jellyfish would leave a fossil record...

Thanks for posting it.
History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.
~Sir Winston Churchill

#8 evannorton

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 03:30 PM

Thanks Araucaria......I will try to dramatically improve the image magnification.

Thanks for the comic relief, Govinn.



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