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FossilDAWG

Fossil Sculptures

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FossilDAWG

I thought I'd post some photos of a couple of sculptures my son made for me. He's always had this magical ability to make amazingly realistic sculptures, mostly working with clay or Fimo.

Any other 3D artists out there?

Don

post-528-0-83558900-1360117957_thumb.jpg post-528-0-01511700-1360117988_thumb.jpg post-528-0-51735800-1360118026_thumb.jpg

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MikeR

Wow, that's impressive.

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FossilDAWG

And a few more photos.

Don

post-528-0-38756800-1360118512_thumb.jpg post-528-0-69441200-1360118530_thumb.jpg post-528-0-84085300-1360118548_thumb.jpg post-528-0-00777600-1360118610_thumb.jpg

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NetDoc

Simply wow. I'm impressed.

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Missourian

Excellent stuff.

The flower pot is a nice touch.

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Fossildude19

These are awesome.

Like the ceph going after the trilo!

Thanks for sharing them with us.

Regards,

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Clayton Jones

That's quite a talent your son has there. I know there are a few other 3D artists and sculptors here on the forums, including myself that would love to see more of his work. Though I'm pretty sure everybody would like to see more of his work as well!

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Bev

AWESOME Work! How old is he?

Bev :)

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AgrilusHunter

These are awesome! The detail on that cephalopod is amazing! Thanks for sharing.

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stonesnbones

Very impressive....your son has a great talent

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mikeymig

A line of different Crinoid species growing out of flower pots sounds like a great marketing idea to me. I would collect them all and hey, you don't have to water them!

Mikey

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Roz

Your son has talent, Don! :)

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FossilDAWG

Thanks everyone. Bev, he just turned 28. I always thought he'd take a shot at art as a career, but he bumped heads with an art teacher in high school who was one of those people who insisted that everything had to be done in their own style, and gave him grief constantly because he wanted to do his own style. Basically, as I recall, this teacher had the all-to-common perspective that if you could recognize a piece as some specific person or thing then it wasn't art, it was just "technical drawing". All of the teacher's work was so abstract you couldn't begin to say if it was a person, a dog, or what. The animosity was so high that the teacher refused to accept my son's AP portfolio, so he didn't get AP credit for his work. (For those not in the know, AP = "advanced placement", a process where students can get University credit for doing advanced work in high school. In this case, portfolios have to be submitted, through the high school teacher, to a panel of University art faculty who assign an AP grade to the portfolio. Because the teacher refused to accept the portfolio or submit it for grading, it was never seen by the panel and he was given a grade of F for the AP credit.) It all left such a bad taste that he stopped doing any kind of art for years, and only started making a few pieces again fairly recently. The teacher left the high school about a year later; I don't know the circumstances, but I know that other students/parents also had lots of complaints.

Don

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NetDoc

A number, although not all, AP instructors let the fact that they are ersatz college professors go to their head. They lose all the fun and magic that their discipline has to offer and make things overly hard to impress someone somewhere. My daughter suffered through two such courses and I refused to let my son take any because of that. Highschoolers need to enjoy their childhood and leave college to college. I would think he has a ready market for his work right here, even if he only does it part time.

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erose

He should see this web site: http://www.chasestudio.com/HOMEPAGE.HTM

Thosse are nice pieces. But the story about how a single teacher messed up a possible career in art is tragic. He's not old to find a way to make that talent pay.

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lormouth

Hello,

Your son have talent and he should continued to practice art. If he like it, he should not stop it.

I'm 34 years old and I never stoped sculpting, drawing and having an interest in art. That's on of my hobbies, I'm dental prosthesit and I being an artist has never been my wish. Some of my friend are trying to become artist

Sometimes several time without doing anything

Seven month ago, after a long time without sculpting, I decided to join my passion for dinosaurs and fossils

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lormouth

OUPS!!! Sorry, I did a mistake and didn't finished writing correctly ....

Some of my friend are trying to become artist for a long time but it's very hard... and they have to find another jod to live but they never stop art, they like it. The most important is never stopping because of someone who don't like what you do.

Here a photo of what i'm doing today. I did others and will continue to do it.

P.S. Sorry for my bad english, I hope you understood the meaning of what I said..

post-11022-0-49245500-1360521951_thumb.jpg

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Ramo

Those are awesome lormouth!! I don't know how much time those take you, but I'm sure there would be a market for those.

Ramo

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Raistlin

Those are so awesome. You have a great son who has an amazing talent.

He could make some money with that talent. Those are such beautiful peices.

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Missourian

he bumped heads with an art teacher in high school who was one of those people who insisted that everything had to be done in their own style, and gave him grief constantly because he wanted to do his own style. Basically, as I recall, this teacher had the all-to-common perspective that if you could recognize a piece as some specific person or thing then it wasn't art, it was just "technical drawing". All of the teacher's work was so abstract you couldn't begin to say if it was a person, a dog, or what.

'Technical drawing' is not art? So what is everything before the 20th century? The art teacher can have opinions on the nature of art, but giving your son a failing grade is unacceptable. He/she should have at least been reprimanded.

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32fordboy

The only reason I sculpt is for the relaxation of it. If it was a full-time gig, I would have starved to death long ago. haha

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JimB88

I too sculpt for the pleasure of it mostly. I was going to get into the action figure business but thats going digital with 3d printers now. For now Im experimenting in wood and combining my love of paleo subject matter with sculpting.

Your son does fine work by the way. Encourage him to keep it up!

Im one of those fools who got a degree in art (BFA) which is a useless piece of paper as far as Im concerned. I stopped doing fine art do to the attitude of the fine art community.

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FossilDAWG

Thanks again to all for the generous comments.

It's always a bit of a conundrum when you choose to make your passion your profession. On the one hand, life is too short to spend your working life doing something that isn't interesting or challenging, if you can help it anyway. Might as well take a stab at a career doing something you enjoy or are passionate about. On the other hand, a good way to kill a passion is to turn it into a job, something you have to do every day even when you would really rather do anything else. I count myself as being very fortunate, in that I have a career that I enjoy (most days, anyway) and find very challenging, yet I also have passionate interests (family, fossils, music) that I can enjoy without the pressure of depending on them for a living.

Maybe things turned out for the best for my son, too, as he has rediscovered his art but is not pressured to constantly produce. My next door neighbor is a sculptor (large wood and fiberglass creations), but makes his living entirely from teaching; he would definitely starve if he had to make a living selling his sculptures, and I think they are pretty cool.

Dpn

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Down under fossil hunter

OUPS!!! Sorry, I did a mistake and didn't finished writing correctly ....

Some of my friend are trying to become artist for a long time but it's very hard... and they have to find another jod to live but they never stop art, they like it. The most important is never stopping because of someone who don't like what you do.

Here a photo of what i'm doing today. I did others and will continue to do it.

P.S. Sorry for my bad english, I hope you understood the meaning of what I said..

They are amazing, the quality and detail is stunning, have you tried selling them? I am sure you would have no trouble at all!

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lormouth

I sold once last year, I did a second skull of all and put one Ebay. Sold for an association. It payed back all the silicone and resin and today I try to sold again but I think I put a too expensive price^^.

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