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GeoJon

Western Washington Plant Fossil Localities?

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GeoJon

What's up, every one? My name is GeoJon, and I ocasionally visit this forum. However, I am now sending a call out to the Western Washington collectors who may read this.Some acquaintances of mine are now finishing a paper on a middle miocene plant fossil locaity that I've helped excavate in the Seattle area. It's tentatively dated at about 18 millkion years BP, and really cool. Sorry, I can't reveal exactly where it is, because it is on private property.

However, since the work there is done, I plan to prospect for more Oligocene-or-younger aged plant localities once I get back to Washington state. (I'm down here in Texas to pursue career goals.) I am absolutely convinced that they ARE out there, and that a concerted effort by private collectors to find such sites would contribute greatly to our common knowledge of neogene Western Washington floras. I do volunteer collecting for the UW, and I believe that science will benefit greatly from an effort like this. I am particularly interested in hearing if any one has found any non-Eocene stuff in the Issaquah-North Bend area. I've collected extensively in the Eocene formations of the Puget Sound Lowland, (Renton, Tukwila, Chuckanut, etc.). so I'm pretty familiar with those. I've also heard of miocene plants found near Salmon Creek and Oligocene stuff from the Ohanapecosh. If any one is out collecting in Western Washington and you all find any interesting plant stuff, please send me a private message. I'll make a habit of checking my private messages, and hopefully we can talk!.

-GeoJon

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DLB

Most stuff of that age that I have found is in the Lincoln creek formation of WA all the rest that I have found runs older sorry cant help with you're question.

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GeoJon

DLB,

Thanks for the reply! Right on! I've been to the Lincoln Creek, down by Porter. Found a sea urchin test that was pretty cool. Is there lots of plant material, or just scattered stuff? Also, what type is it? Have you found leaves or fruits? Or is it carbonized wood, leaf fragments, and that kind of stuff?

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DLB

DLB,

Thanks for the reply! Right on! I've been to the Lincoln Creek, down by Porter. Found a sea urchin test that was pretty cool. Is there lots of plant material, or just scattered stuff? Also, what type is it? Have you found leaves or fruits? Or is it carbonized wood, leaf fragments, and that kind of stuff?

Mostly scattered stuff like wood some leafs and occasional cone.

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GeoJon

Where do you find the ieaves and cones? Are they identifiable as to the particular taxa?

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DLB

I come across them while I dig for concreations and usually don't keep any but u probably could I'd some if u found any the detail is fairly good but not as good as the republic stuff we find.

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GeoJon

DLB, thanks for your comments. It looks like you may be finding some good stuff. Can you see veins on the leaves? If so, are they just midveins, or can you see secondaries? The cones sound interesting, too. Most of the knowledge I've gleaned of Western Washington Oligocene plant fossils is from my old friend Wes (rest his soul) long ago, so I don't know too much...Lots of the stuff at the UW is nuts and cones from the Olympic peninsula, if I remember right. Are the cones you find in good shape? Cones are usually identified by the arrangement of the seeds inside.

MAN, you mentioned Republic! It's been ages since I've been up there! Probably seven years at least. Do they still allow a person to keep only three leaves at the Stonerose site? I think Republic is pretty much the standard for leaf preservation in Washington...My sister has a beautiful florissantia from Republic on her mantel. I am digressing here. Now, as far as the Lincoln Creek, I've only been down there once, looking for the crab locality listed in Garrett Romaine's guidebook. Can you tell me where some of your concretion sites are? If not the exact localities, then the general areas? If not, then that's cool.

I'm trying to get my sister-in-law interested in fossil hunting. My niece and nephew are three and five years old, respectively, so perhaps one of them is a budding scientist:) :)...? Perhaps if their crazy relative sent them down to the Lincoln Creek, they'd find a nice crab? Of course, since I'm down here in Texas learning to drive a truck, I can't go with them. I've also heard a report of fossil leaves (hopefully non-Eocene) from the mts. around Issaquah. Have you heard any thing? Thanks again.

Edited by GeoJon

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DLB

DLB, thanks for your comments. It looks like you may be finding some good stuff. Can you see veins on the leaves? If so, are they just midveins, or can you see secondaries? The cones sound interesting, too. Most of the knowledge I've gleaned of Western Washington Oligocene plant fossils is from my old friend Wes (rest his soul) long ago, so I don't know too much...Lots of the stuff at the UW is nuts and cones from the Olympic peninsula, if I remember right. Are the cones you find in good shape? Cones are usually identified by the arrangement of the seeds inside.

MAN, you mentioned Republic! It's been ages since I've been up there! Probably seven years at least. Do they still allow a person to keep only three leaves at the Stonerose site? I think Republic is pretty much the standard for leaf preservation in Washington...My sister has a beautiful florissantia from Republic on her mantel. I am digressing here. Now, as far as the Lincoln Creek, I've only been down there once, looking for the crab locality listed in Garrett Romaine's guidebook. Can you tell me where some of your concretion sites are? If not the exact localities, then the general areas? If not, then that's cool.

I'm trying to get my sister-in-law interested in fossil hunting. My niece and nephew are three and five years old, respectively, so perhaps one of them is a budding scientist:) :)...? Perhaps if their crazy relative sent them down to the Lincoln Creek, they'd find a nice crab? Of course, since I'm down here in Texas learning to drive a truck, I can't go with them. I've also heard a report of fossil leaves (hopefully non-Eocene) from the mts. around Issaquah. Have you heard any thing? Thanks again.

No cant give the exact location but they have decent veins in them I found some close to the Columbia river that were part of the lincoln creek formation and are nice ;) republic only allows three still but there can't be some good stuff to be found for the people that are willing to make the drive :)

Edited by DLB

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CH4ShotCaller

DLB is right, scattered is the best description when it comes to finding plant material. Some areas I've never found anything except teredo in the LCF and other areas I'll find what looks like Alder with fine detail with veins and twig parts. If I ever find a site loaded with plant material, will let you know.

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CH4ShotCaller

Here's one I found last year, not in a concretion, but I kept it anyway 'cause it had detail.

post-7395-0-13592100-1363881959_thumb.jpg

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GeoJon

Here's one I found last year, not in a concretion, but I kept it anyway 'cause it had detail.

attachicon.gif005.JPG

Looks like you have some terminal leaflets there? Or maybe something platanaceous and beat up. Not bad at all compared to some of the other Oligocene stuff I have seen. Yes, please let me know if you find a good plant site.Looks like I am going to be down here in Texas for some time, because I'm trying to get this stupid form signed so I can drive a truck, However, SW Washington looks interesting for plants. Thank you for your posts, CH4.

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Luke

GeoJon how is your quest for fossil leaf localities going any updates im looking to try to find something other than marine and would love some input im in Vancouver, Wa

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Fossildude19

GeoJon how is your quest for fossil leaf localities going any updates im looking to try to find something other than marine and would love some input im in Vancouver, Wa

You could start your research at this website.

The information is old, but it may give you a starting point, at least.

Good Luck.

Regards,

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GeoJon

Fossil Dude and Luke, very sorry it took me so long to reply. I try to reply to people's posts as soon as I can, but it should not have taken me so long to reply to this one. I haven't been back to Washington state in about two years now, so my knowledge of collecting localities there isn't current. I have heard of Miocene age leaves being found in Salmon Creek near Chehalis, but I've never been down to Salmon Creek. Another place that I basically started my hobby at is on Newport Way, on the border between Issaquah and Bellevue. Take I-90 east from Bellevue until you get to exit 13. This is the exit for Newport Way. The fossils are mostly Oligocene age marine shellfish, and are located about 1/2 miles west of the exit in a grey sandstone. There's another place called Cedar Ponds, near the town of Sultan. Directions to it are in Gem Trails of Washington State. Eocene-aged leaves are found here, and the flora looks very similar to stuff from the Tukwila and Renton formations. Other than that, I can't help you much... I put my original post on here because several years ago I discovered and helped excavate a Miocene leaf locality near Issaquah. There is now a collection from that locality at the UW and a paper has been published. I was hoping to get other collectors interested in locating neogene plant localities in Western Washington state because except for the floral collection I made, one from Enumclaw, and the material from Salmon Creek, as far as I know there are no known floras of middle Oligocene or younger age known west of the Cascade mountains in The Evergreen State. Either the fossils aren't there, no one has looked for them, or the dates of older floras are off. However, my life has changed since my last post and I've decided to enjoy the weather here in stead of going back to Washington.

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