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Tsulami

Looking For Some New Fossil Sites Near Eastern Kansas.

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Tsulami

Hello everyone,

I live in Lawrence and have tons of stuff from the Pennsylvanian limestone around here. I was wondering if anyone has any spots that aren't more than a few hours away that I could check out. I went to Tuttle creek spillway last Wednesday but all the Permian stuff there is pretty dead. I am looking to get some different stuff if anyone could help me out with suggestions.

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jpc

Darn... all the Permian stuff I've ever collected is also pretty dead.

Soory, couldn't resist.

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Bullsnake

Well, now that we're on the downhill side of winter, I'll certainly be getting out as much as possible. I'll send you a p.m. when I do.

We can figure something out, I'm sure!

I was supposed to go this weekend, but my work thinks it's more important that I be there. :rolleyes:

EDIT: The Pennsylvanian stuff is all dead, too! :D

Edited by Bullsnake

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Tsulami

I was considering going down by Hamilton

Well, now that we're on the downhill side of winter, I'll certainly be getting out as much as possible. I'll send you a p.m. when I do.

We can figure something out, I'm sure!

I was supposed to go this weekend, but my work thinks it's more important that I be there. :rolleyes:

EDIT: The Pennsylvanian stuff is all dead, too! :D

I was thinking about going down by Hamilton KS to that quarry where they have found insect wings. Anyway let me know anytime you have a fossil hunt planned and I'll see if I can make it. Wednesdays and Saturdays are best for me right now.

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Missourian

For years, I've been searching for exposures in the Shawnee Group strata, especially the Beil Limestone and some beds in the Topeka Fm. So far, the hard-to-find exposures and slightly excessive distance from KC have curtailed my attempts.

As far as Hamilton goes.... yes, it is quite restricted. Someone from Emporia State said that law enforcement is aware of the importance of the site, and that they do keep an eye on it. Speaking of Emporia, I visited Hamilton back in 2002 during an Emporia-led field trip. One guy actually found a roach wing while we were there, but I don't think he was allowed to keep it. If something 'lesser' is found.... that may be another matter. I don't know if they offer those field trips anymore.

And the Tuttle Creek spillway.... I'd like to visit just to see the officially recognized Carboniferous-Permian stratotype boundary. :)

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Al Dente

And the Tuttle Creek spillway.... I'd like to visit just to see the officially recognized Carboniferous-Permian stratotype boundary. :)

Did they move it? I thought it was in the Ural Mountains.

I had a friend who did some work in the 1980s at Hamilton Quarry. He said at the end of the season they would bury the collecting area with dirt to prevent people from collecting. I wonder if they still do this.

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Missourian

Did they move it? I thought it was in the Ural Mountains.

I had a friend who did some work in the 1980s at Hamilton Quarry. He said at the end of the season they would bury the collecting area with dirt to prevent people from collecting. I wonder if they still do this.

Maybe not quite the official boundary. It is proposed to be the stratotype for North America, at least. One desirable aspect is that it is that it appears to be an uninterrupted transition, which allows for biostratigraphic correlation.

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Missourian

I had a friend who did some work in the 1980s at Hamilton Quarry. He said at the end of the season they would bury the collecting area with dirt to prevent people from collecting. I wonder if they still do this.

That would be a really good idea.

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Tsulami

We'll snarge scratch Hamilton I guess, anywhere else one could find insect fossils nearby? I know they found some in lawrence a long time ago but I will be damned if I have seen any.

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Xiphactinus

We'll snarge scratch Hamilton I guess, anywhere else one could find insect fossils nearby? I know they found some in lawrence a long time ago but I will be damned if I have seen any.

Tsulami -

I found some in the spillway of Lone Star Lake back in the 80's/early 90's, but they have covered that area in concrete. There MIGHT be more exposure down the creek from the spillway, but I don't know who the landowner is, and there are "no trespassing" signs everywhere near the spillway.

Supposedly, there have been insects found in the emergency spillway of Clinton Reservoir, along side of Clinton Parkway. (The bike path goes through there today.) I've hunted it several times, and haven't found any plants/insects. I hunted it as recently as October.

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Missourian

Anywhere you can find many well-preserved plants, there is a slim chance that insects could turn up.

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Tsulami

Yeah I had been to lone star before they paved it, but I wasn't into fossils then. From what I have seen since it looks like there isn't anything left to be found there. I mostly hunt by the river, lots of exposed and weathering rock. I have a big one I need to post for id. Sometimes I hunt the road cuts around the lake too. Just looking for more variety I guess.

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Tsulami

Also I looked up some of the coordinates in google earth that Missourian post related to this topic, they look like privately owned plots but I can always ask. When everything thaws out maybe.

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Ray Eklund

Eastern Kansas and nothing to add! What are all of you doing in your free time? Waiting to see the Broncos do some whipping on the East Coast... or not. But come on.

Wyandotte County, Lane Shale, Pennsylvanian. Washed out crinoids, calyx and arms. Last time I was there was in 1968 and between several highways, maybe even Highway 70 and old 24/40. There is a Lane Shale exposure, rather bluish grey facing east. It has been so long when I was there as a kid, I cannot even give you better directions... but find the Lane Shale on a geological map and narrow it down. About every several months I would go and find well preserved crinoids.

Tonganoxie Sandstone. Urasteralla starfish impressions and trilobite tracks. Pennsylvanian. Again one you will have to find the exposures and walk them. The people finding the slabs were not talking exact locations, but probably a bit north of Wyandotte County, Kansas.

There is north of Independence, Missouri some back asphalt roads heading north. One small creek crossing by small bridge has about 100 feet of blue shale facing north on the west side of the road. Slabs of a hard limey bluish shale also with starfish impressions and trilobite tracks. These were washing out of the softer shales and would slide down towards the creek bed. The starfish are "raised and easy to see". It is East highway 71 by a few miles and in a wooded area. Some people would come and target practice just on the north side of the creek. Without pulling up Google to find the location, as this was also in the late 1960's I found this spot.

Can't find this spot? Take Noland Road north toward where the Independence Police Department firing range is located on top. There is so much limestone and shale exposed in vertical cliffs you can't help to find fossils. Even parts and pieces of Pennsylvanian trilobites (Phillipsia ? cannot remember the name, but only parts and pieces was my luck). I do believe, if you keep going north on Noland, cross Highway 71 and keep wandering around the meandering road... you will eventually find the Starfish location.

If you have not found any of this locations... you are not trying!

I found these places by geological maps and driving around like some lost idiot. You would stop, get out and find nothing... mark it on the map... and go to the next good outcrop.

Ammonites in the Raytown (Missouri) Reef, Pennsylvanian for lots of unusual fossils. These early ammonites, complete, will weigh 50 pounds or more. Exposures not far off of I-70 and some limestone quarries near Raytown quarry the reef as it is easily shaped for home stone exterior facings. The quarry guys would stash the nicer ammonites for... sale or mounting over a fire place. Once you find the first outcrop... you will recognize the massive amounts of crushed shells and partial ammonites.

Across from the Royals and Chiefs stadium... on the north side... is a quarry where the best fossil hunting is on the East side and not quarried as it is impure with... shale and fossils. Bring a bucket. Cannot find it... then drive around for awhile. I think the last time we drove by they had built a 18 wheeler dispatch complex... but look to the EAST and see those flat shales. A bit yellow/tan looking.

If you need someone to consult, find my friend here. Best rock hunting buddy I have know. A bit ornery, but hey... he's a Jackalope.

post-14238-0-24258200-1390785696_thumb.jpg

Edited by Ray Eklund

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Ray Eklund

Well, now that we're on the downhill side of winter, I'll certainly be getting out as much as possible. I'll send you a p.m. when I do.

We can figure something out, I'm sure!

I was supposed to go this weekend, but my work thinks it's more important that I be there. :rolleyes:

EDIT: The Pennsylvanian stuff is all dead, too! :D

Use to climb around the Bonner Springs limestone quarry. My best find one July was a large copper head snake sunning itself on some tailings. Last time I went there and was empty handed, anyways.

Good luck.

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Ray Eklund

There were some Permian reptiles being found west of Garnett, Kansas. The wife and I went there in the early 1990's and found the site where KU had quarried a specimen that gave the location. We saw in the limestone in the area some brown partial bones, but nothing more interesting.

If someone found this exposure near a corn field, there has to be better spots exposed where no one would be even looking. Can you imagine how many residential areas have been built on great fossil sites? They dig and you pick it up. I did it, you can too!

Again, it has been so long ago that we were there, I cannot add much to direction. My purpose is to let you know that weirder things have happened if you look hard enough.

Kansas, Permian, Reptiles (maybe add county name) on a Google search and maybe will turn up.

Fossil hunting is not something you do to relax. You must earn a location, find something never seen before... and unlike me... keep the site secret from the general population, until you are ready to share. It takes many weekends with empty cartons and lots of rock whacking with the sharp end of your rock pick... not your forehead.

Edited by Ray Eklund

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Bullsnake

Use to climb around the Bonner Springs limestone quarry. My best find one July was a large copper head snake sunning itself on some tailings. Last time I went there and was empty handed, anyways.

Good luck.

Yeah, I called for permission and got turned down. APAC owns it now and the guy I spoke to said any property on both sides of the adjacent roads belong to them also and will not allow any activity on the property.

The guy was very nice, though, and said if it was up to him, he wouldn't mind.

Anymore around here, it's pretty much hit roadcuts until the police tell you to move on. Unless you know someone with outcrops on their property.

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Missourian

Eastern Kansas and nothing to add! What are all of you doing in your free time? Waiting to see the Broncos do some whipping on the East Coast... or not. But come on.

...........

Wyandotte County, Lane Shale, Pennsylvanian. Washed out crinoids, calyx and arms. Last time I was there was in 1968 and between several highways, maybe even Highway 70 and old 24/40. There is a Lane Shale exposure, rather bluish grey facing east. It has been so long when I was there as a kid, I cannot even give you better directions... but find the Lane Shale on a geological map and narrow it down. About every several months I would go and find well preserved crinoids.

Tonganoxie Sandstone. Urasteralla starfish .......... .........

........................... ................ .......................... .....

....................... Across from the Royals and Chiefs stadium... on the north side... is a quarry where the best fossil hunting is on the East side and not quarried as it is impure with... shale and fossils. Bring a bucket. Cannot find it... then drive around for awhile. I think the last time we drove by they had built a 18 wheeler dispatch complex... but look to the EAST and see those flat shales. A bit yellow/tan looking.

If you need someone to consult, find my friend here. Best rock hunting buddy I have know. A bit ornery, but hey... he's a Jackalope.

-------------------------

Fossil hunting is not something you do to relax. You must earn a location, find something never seen before... and unlike me... keep the site secret from the general population, until you are ready to share. It takes many weekends with empty cartons and lots of rock whacking with the sharp end of your rock pick... not your forehead.

You covered the essence (i.e. beauty and frustration) of the Kansas Pennsylvanian. There is stuff to be found, but you really have to earn it. And exposures appear, change and disappear over time. The fossils found at some sites are the stuff of legends (e.g. Holliday Drive, with its first-rate Muncie Creek and Lane (now Liberty Memorial Shale)), but they are now covered with overburden and vegetation.

So, in other words, when someone asks what can be found in eastern Kansas, there is seldom a straightforward answer. I could say "Try the Lane/Lib-Mem Shale along 435", or "try the Beil Limestone between Lawrence and Topeka", but they may come up empty handed, expecting it to be similar to more generous outcrops found in other parts of the country.

I'm still looking for new outcrops, but I'm trying to figure out how to do it with remote sensing (i.e. with the Interwebs). The hit-and-miss is just too frustrating for me to put so many miles on my car.

Edited by Missourian

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gfnewfossil

Street view Google Earth ID the strata on the road banks from the couch. Then make your move

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