jnoun11

Moroccans Mosasaurs

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:goodjob:

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Very well said, jnoun. Your topic has been "Pinned".

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Wow!! thanks for taking the time to put this together, great job awesome pics... i've learned alot here, very interesting thank you

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Great thread. Great information. Hats off.

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Congratulations for this post! I've learnt a lot of things about these fossils! Thank you!

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Thank you Sergio

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Prognathodon solvayi

SYSTEMATIC PALEONTOLOGY

Order SQUAMATA Oppell, 1811

Family MOSASAURIDAE Gervais, 1853

Subfamily MOSASAURINAE Williston, 1897

Genus PROGNATHODON Dollo, 1889

*Prognathodon solvayi

= Prognathosaurus solvayi

note: This specimen is actually unique and didn t exist officially in Morocco

attachicon.gifDSCN6079.JPG

skull

attachicon.gifDSCN0636.JPG

close-up of teeth

I hope this one went into a museum or public collection. I doubt it is a Prognathodon. To me looks like the first complete skull of Platecarpus? ptychodon, a rare species so far only known from teeth. It needs to be scientifically described. Awesome specimens! Thanks for sharing...

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Platecarpus ptychodon

systematic paleontology

Reptilia Laurenti 1768

Squamata Oppel 1811

Mosasauridae Gervais 1853

Plioplatecarpinae Russell 1967

Platecarpus Cope 1869

Platecarpus ptychodon Arambourg , 1952
publication:
ARAMBOURG C. 1952. — Les vertébrés fossiles des gisements de phosphates (Maroc – Algérie – Tunisie). Notes et Mémoires du Service géologique du Maroc 92:1-372.
diagnosis :
small teeth with bicarinate higly laterally compressed crowns, subequal lingal and labial surfaces bearing verticals striations that are more numerous on the lingual face and developed only on the two thirds of the crown height. The dental morphology of P.ptychodon is quite distinct from those of other mosasaurids, such that this taxon (which was erected on the basis of isolated teeth only) is provisionally regarded as valid.
12 or 13 teeth on a dentary, 14 on a maxillary
skeleton
skull
close-up of the teeth

Ok just scrolled further down - and being amazed! You have a complete skeleton of P.? ptychodon...!!! Still I do not believe the other specimen is a Prognathodon. Maybe some other form of plioplatecarpine?

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I would seriously NOT want to meet one of those things swimming! :D

Very informative,

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I had thought this might be a Halisaurus, but based on your images I wonder if it could be a Platecarpus ptychodon skull - do you (or others) have an opinion?

post-6717-0-99709400-1393156794_thumb.jpg

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Jnoun;

Thank you for this very informative post. I visited Morocco almost twenty years ago and found that your country is literally a treasure trove of fossils. I observed fossils being sold just about everywhere, without any scientific knowledge, as curios. I'l admit I bought a few cephalopods and a trilobite though I really wasn't into collecting back then. Since then I've seen lots of these fossils have made their way to the U.S. and today make up a large component of the market for fossil curios that are available at shops, shows and on the net. I too am impressed. This year I found a stream worn mosasaur tooth in New Jersey and count it among my best finds of the year. The fossils you show are incredible, but it's the scientific knowledge you share that I believe that transforms these remarkable specimens from curios to stories about life in prehistoric seas. By doing so I feel you give them the respect they and your beautiful country deserve. Thanks.

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Below are my collection of Upper Cretaceous Mosasaurus beaugei teeth (from the Ouled Abdoun Basin of Morocco) and a painting of the acutal marian reptile, which I posted awhile back. This might be the most famous mosasaur found in Morocco. I've also posted Enchodus (giant fish) teeth from the same area.

---- Olenellus

post-1777-0-18319400-1393295060_thumb.jpg

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Very good info,, thanks so much.

I'm just learning about Morocco mosasaurs, but have seen and collected a number here in Manitoba, Canada.

Our local musuem, the Canadain fossil Discovery Centre ( discoverfossils.com) has Canada's largest collection of mosasaurs, and a number of plesiosaurs,too.

Can you please comment on the apparent scarcity/rareness of plesiousaur fossils, especially skulls, from |Morocco?

We have very few skulls and tons of vertebrae, as usual.

But Morocco plesio skulls seem even rarer.

Thanks.

Joe.

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Hi Jnoun,

Years ago, when I started going to the Tucson shows, I was amazed by the diversity of mosasaur tooth types from the Moroccan phosphates. Being interested in sharks, I thought some of the teeth might have represented different jaw positions but some of the tooth forms did represent different genera, if not species.

Those are nice photos of the Prognathodon sp. skull. Where is that specimen on display? Do you know which publication (or publications) was used as a guide in preparing that skeleton? I have seen some nice figures for bones of other mosasaurs but have not seen many for Prognathodon sp. It does seem to be one of the more common forms from Morocco. Are there a number of well-prepped skulls or skeletons on display in Europe?

Thank you for taking the time to list and distinguish them for this forum. I had not seen a specimen of Eremiasaurus before.

Jess

Prognathodon .sp

SYSTEMATIC PALEONTOLOGY
Order SQUAMATA Oppell, 1811
Family MOSASAURIDAE Gervais, 1853
Subfamily MOSASAURINAE Williston, 1897
Genus PROGNATHODON Dollo, 1889

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Hi Jnoun,

Years ago, when I started going to the Tucson shows, I was amazed by the diversity of mosasaur tooth types from the Moroccan phosphates. Being interested in sharks, I thought some of the teeth might have represented different jaw positions but some of the tooth forms did represent different genera, if not species.

Those are nice photos of the Prognathodon sp. skull. Where is that specimen on display? Do you know which publication (or publications) was used as a guide in preparing that skeleton? I have seen some nice figures for bones of other mosasaurs but have not seen many for Prognathodon sp. It does seem to be one of the more common forms from Morocco. Are there a number of well-prepped skulls or skeletons on display in Europe?

Thank you for taking the time to list and distinguish them for this forum. I had not seen a specimen of Eremiasaurus before.

Jess

hi jess

prognathodon is a most common specie in moroccan phosphates, but because the specie is allready studied, the specialists dont make revision of this huge groupe of reptiles. in europe is no well prepared skull from moroccans mosasaurs, because the people they prepared them dont care about anatomy and thinks nobody will see that. most of the people didnt care about correct anatomy, is to bad.

eremiasaurus is very rare mosasaur . adn i joint some internet links for more informations about prognathodon:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02724634.2011.601714#preview

https://www.google.com/#q=prognathodon+pdf&start=10

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Hi Jnoun11,

Thank you for your comments and the links.

Two weeks ago, I had a chance to see an unprepped mosasaur skull from the phosphates and I helped take part of it out of matrix. It was crushed with some of the bones shifted over to one side so it was time-consuming to separate the bones and teeth. The jaws were pressed tightly against each other. If anyone is going to be working on one, make sure you harden the bone surface as you clean it. As is often the case, the bones are more fragile than they look.

Jess

hi jess

prognathodon is a most common specie in moroccan phosphates, but because the specie is allready studied, the specialists dont make revision of this huge groupe of reptiles. in europe is no well prepared skull from moroccans mosasaurs, because the people they prepared them dont care about anatomy and thinks nobody will see that. most of the people didnt care about correct anatomy, is to bad.

eremiasaurus is very rare mosasaur . adn i joint some internet links for more informations about prognathodon:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02724634.2011.601714#preview

https://www.google.com/#q=prognathodon+pdf&start=10

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hi mosasaurs lovers

another new mosasaur in moroccans phosphates. look like prognathodon little ,but the teeth are weird... if somebody have a determination about this specimen, welcome.

post-2284-0-25053800-1401826334_thumb.jpg

post-2284-0-92509600-1401826376_thumb.jpg

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It's the same ?

post-5456-0-63322000-1406883007_thumb.jpg

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It's the same ?

hi mister tartoche

your specimen is halisaurus arambourgi, is differents , on my specimen the teeth are lateraly compressed.

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Hey Jnoun,

Some while ago .. I came across this in Morocco, I guess it's a kind of Prognatodon?

nose:

post-10068-0-27397000-1418923059_thumb.jpg

sclerotic ring:

post-10068-0-84885700-1418923060_thumb.jpg

skull:

post-10068-0-37995500-1418923063_thumb.jpg

Edited by Fitch1979

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very NICE MOSASAUR SKULL..

jOE.

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YOU ARE A WALKING ENCYCLOPAEDIA! That is a lot of info… That will come in handy!

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hi fitch and dinoboy

it s a joung prognathodon, very nice specimen, the sclerotic ring is superb. unfortunatly prognathodon in morocco is not studied yet. and lot of scientific work about phosphates material are incomplete. i can not going further for the specie. nobody is a walking encyclopaedia , after 200 years of mosasaurs studies nobody can give a correct definition of mosasaurs...

congratulation for this specimen fitch.

http://bsgf.geoscienceworld.org/content/183/1/7.abstract

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Hope this doesn't count as a topic hi-jack since it's about a Mosasaur tooth ID which I am conflicted between Prognathodon, Beaugei or Platecarpus but isn't sure or knowledgeable enough to decide conclusively, here is what it looks like:

post-10857-0-16637000-1421427027_thumb.jpgpost-10857-0-85009400-1421427052_thumb.jpgpost-10857-0-96678500-1421427183_thumb.jpg

I actually started another thread in this link regarding the questioning of the ID of this tooth, here is the link in case it's more appropriate to discuss there, though I figured the Mosasaur experts will probably be in this thread:

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/51849-mosasaur-tooth-beaugei-or-platecarpus/

Anyway, any input and insight from the mosasaur experts here will be appreciated. Thx in advance :)

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